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Discussion Starter #1
I bought an Art & Lutherie Legacy last fall... and have grown to like it's sound.
Now, I want a to buy a larger and better quality guitar... either a Simon and Patrick - Showcase Mahogany or Seagull - Artist Mosaic Element (Mahogany).
I know they have different headstocks, but does anyone know if one is better than the other?
 

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Either of those would be a great choice. Mostly a matter of personal taste. The cedar top of the Seagull will give you a different tone from the spruce in the S&P, but "better" is in the ear of the beholder. The Seagull will have a wider fretboard too - also a matter of personal preference. Best bet is to play them both and see what you like.

Edit: Why do you want a larger guitar?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Brian... I should have worded my question differently.
Apart from fretboard size and wood tops... (spruce is available on other Seagull models) are there any manufacturing differences I should know about.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Years ago, I spent a day filming a TV show with Robert Godin demonstrating how they make their guitars. If I were to do it today, I'd ask him what are the differences, if any...
Anyone have an inside scoop?
 

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A few years ago, I asked a Godin dealer the same question. It is like the Chevy/Pontiac arrangement. There are slight differences in style he told me, like the headstock and fretboard size that Brian mentioned but the rest of the guitar is built with the same design and quality of materials. The difference is so they one outlet can have the S & P line and the other, the Seagull line.One line may have a few different models than the other one but for the ones that are basically the same specs, they are the same guitar except for the differences mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A few years ago, I asked a Godin dealer the same question. It is like the Chevy/Pontiac arrangement. There are slight differences in style he told me, like the headstock and fretboard size that Brian mentioned but the rest of the guitar is built with the same design and quality of materials. The difference is so they one outlet can have the S & P line and the other, the Seagull line.One line may have a few different models than the other one but for the ones that are basically the same specs, they are the same guitar except for the differences mentioned above.
Cheers...
 

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Both guitars are constructed pretty much the same ,However I prefer the Simon & Patrick cause i like the headstock better than the Seagull & the neck on the Seagull is almost a soft V shape which i didn't really like compared to the S & P . I own 2 S&P Woodland pro's & both are great guitars
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was about to install a Pure Mini in my Art & Lutherie Legacy... how would this compare to the factory pickups?
 

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Both guitars are constructed pretty much the same ,However I prefer the Simon & Patrick cause i like the headstock better than the Seagull & the neck on the Seagull is almost a soft V shape which i didn't really like compared to the S & P . I own 2 S&P Woodland pro's & both are great guitars
Ha, I was wondering how long it would be before the Seagull headstock was mentioned. For those not yet in the know, the reason for the Seagull headstock design is because it adds to keeping the guitar in tune because of the straight pull on the strings. You can read this on the Godin/Seagull site.
 

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Fanboy alert.

If my ears can be trusted, the brand names of Seagull and Simon & Patrick are very similar and consistent in quality of tone and projection. Virtual equals when comparing the all solid wood models. That comes from sitting across the lesson room from a great many examples of each over the years, and playing many of my own as well. They all meet a reasonably high threshold of tone quality, punching above their weight (so to speak), without breaking the bank or forcing one to compromise in other areas. Sure, there may be examples of a particular guitar or model that doesn't float your boat, but overall, you're comparing peaches to peaches.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Fanboy alert.

If my ears can be trusted, the brand names of Seagull and Simon & Patrick are very similar and consistent in quality of tone and projection. Virtual equals when comparing the all solid wood models. That comes from sitting across the lesson room from a great many examples of each over the years, and playing many of my own as well. They all meet a reasonably high threshold of tone quality, punching above their weight (so to speak), without breaking the bank or forcing one to compromise in other areas. Sure, there may be examples of a particular guitar or model that doesn't float your boat, but overall, you're comparing peaches to peaches.
Well that's peachy... thanks for the feed back!
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Fanboy alert.

If my ears can be trusted, the brand names of Seagull and Simon & Patrick are very similar and consistent in quality of tone and projection. Virtual equals when comparing the all solid wood models. That comes from sitting across the lesson room from a great many examples of each over the years, and playing many of my own as well. They all meet a reasonably high threshold of tone quality, punching above their weight (so to speak), without breaking the bank or forcing one to compromise in other areas. Sure, there may be examples of a particular guitar or model that doesn't float your boat, but overall, you're comparing peaches to peaches.
Ahh... just saw the Fanboy alert.
I'm new to this forum, so I'm not sure what that means.
 

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Fanboy alert.

If my ears can be trusted, the brand names of Seagull and Simon & Patrick are very similar and consistent in quality of tone and projection. Virtual equals when comparing the all solid wood models. That comes from sitting across the lesson room from a great many examples of each over the years, and playing many of my own as well. They all meet a reasonably high threshold of tone quality, punching above their weight (so to speak), without breaking the bank or forcing one to compromise in other areas. Sure, there may be examples of a particular guitar or model that doesn't float your boat, but overall, you're comparing peaches to peaches.
..................with a different stem.;)
 

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Thanks! I'll make sure not to get a B-Band.
Nothing wrong with the B-Band electronics, just know that if anything ever needs replacing, you'll need to replace the whole kit. Might be a bargaining chip for a better price. My 2-channel B-Band sounded amazing.
 

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Thanks! I'll make sure not to get a B-Band.
Nothing wrong with the B-Band electronics, just know that if anything ever needs replacing, you'll need to replace the whole kit. Might be a bargaining chip for a better price. My 2-channel B-Band sounded amazing.

Edit: Well that hasn't happened for a while!
 

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I have a Rosewood Showcase I bought in 2010 (her name is Mable). It's my most played and most valued guitar. I love her dearly but often think I should of saved up a while longer and went for a Martin. It is actually what brought me to this forum today I am thinking of buying a Martin. Don't tell Mable !
 
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