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Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on a piece for Premier Guitar on expression control and the variety of ways to change what a pedal is doing on the fly, as you play. In discussion with the editor, he mentioned Rainger pedals, that include a pressure pad controller named Igor (because it was first incorporated with the Dr. Freakenstein fuzz). To be assured of accuracy in my reporting, I wrote to Rainger to ask about the inner workings of the pressure pad. And, bloody hell, David Rainger (based in London) wrote back to me on what is a Saturday night for him, almost immediately, with the needed info and clear interest in the piece.

So kudos to him. Tiny pedals, big functionality. Products Archives - Rainger FX
 

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Very cool. I did a few custom expression controlled frequency pedals for a blues player in Chicago.
How is the pad control wise vs an expression pedal.
Awesome idea
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I haven't tried it, but you can see demos of it on Youtube, like this one (at the 1:17 mark). He uses force-sensing resistors, which are very responsive. Some folks may like the fact that there is no rocking back and forth required, merely pressure. Other folks may find that it is easier for them to gauge how far forward or backward their foot is than how much pressure they are applying. Chacun a son gout.

I'm trying to adapt a force-sensing resistor as a controller on the top of my guitar, between bridge and volume knob. I've installed/attached a photocell in past, to do the same thing, but the problem with photocells is that you have to have enough ambient light for blocking the light with your finger to have a noticeable effect. That said, photocells are a bit less twitchy than FSRs.

The nice thing about both photocells and FSRs is that one can use them in a voltage-divider capacity (i.e., as one part of what is essentially an imitation pot), at which point the range of their impact can be easily tailored. One of the downsides of foot-treadles, as most people with wahs can attest, is that you rarely get the full travel of the pot, in order to protect against damage from pushing it past the end of its travel with the force of your body.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't know if anyone has said it before but mhammer ,you are nothing short of a genius
Nah. I've learned a lot over the course of 45 years of dickering around, but I'll accord genius status to others. Thanks, though.
My special skills lie in bigger-picture and systems thinking; something I learned from folks a lot smarter than myself.
Steve Bragg from Empress is coming over to the house in a few days, to show me their Zoia do everything pedal. That guy is a genius.
 
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