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I was cleaning out my back bedroom and finally found my fuzzbox, which is an FY-2. I don't know much about it, so I Googled it and on E-bay, prices in excess of $700 are being asked. It seems an awful lot of money for such a simple outfit. Why is this? Am I holding a pedal grail or something like that? I got it as a gift many years ago, but wasn't playing electric at the time, so I squirreled it away and more or less disremembered it. Thanx for responses!
 

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If its in good working order, they are worth money, maybe not as much as eBay is asking, but decent. There a Shin-EI FY-2 at Spaceman Music a couple of months ago, they had it priced around $300 I think. Stop in and see them, they should be able to tell you what its actually worth.
 

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64 Gretsch 6120, 63 SG Standard, 62 Fender Princeton and a 58 Supro 1624T
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If its in good working order, they are worth money, maybe not as much as eBay is asking, but decent. There a Shin-EI FY-1 at Spaceman Music a couple of months ago, they had it priced around $300 I think. Stop in and see them, they should be able to tell you what its actually worth.
$300-400 is probably realistic. People tend to ask top dollar on reverb or eBay in the hopes Joe Walsh is shopping for what they have.
 

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I have an original that I bought for $20 at a pawnshop in Moncton, back in '92. I bought it because DPDT stompswitches were $20+tax at the time...when you could find them. So, for $20, I got a stompswitch I could cannibalize, a pair of jacks, two pots, and a chassis. I stuck the board away somewhere, and used the other parts for an overdrive I made and gave to my nephew. Don't know what he did with it.

Years later, I got interested in the Shin-Ei, found out through some forum buddies what and how to hook up the controls, and resurrected the board, sticking it in a 1590B (MXR-type) enclosure. Loved it. Found out how to mod it for other sounds, and still have the original as my benchmark, but made easily a half-dozen or more. Is it worth $700? Absolutely not. But it's a really fun pedal that can be easily and cheaply copied, and fits inside a 1590A "mini-enclosure" easily. I don't have the original enclosure, but I still have the aluminum face-plate.

Here's a demo of a pedal I made 6 or 7 years ago that packs a Muff Fuzz and FY-2 clone into a single box. You can use either half alone, or push the FY-2 with the MUff Fuzz. I think I sold it to a guy at a swap/show for $80. I hope he is still enjoying it. One of the signature features of the FY-2 is the midscoop filter it includes, that gives it the illusion of big bottom and sizzling top. The "Tone" control I included in this particular pedal essentially lifts the midscoop, which not only provides a throatier sound but also increases output level. Here's how it's done. I originally drew a 50k scoop-reduction pot. That was serious overkill. 2k is more than enough.


 

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Actually, here's a better demo. The DIYStompbox forum had a 10th anniversary contest in 2013, and I contributed one of the prizes. I put together the board, pots and switches, and shipped it off with my mods to Jon Patton - who designs and makes some pretty nice pedals himself - who assembled it into a chassis, and he got a third fellow to produce a laser-etched faceplate to make it look snazzy. Some VERY nice sounds from a unit designed for maximum flexibility. The pedals that won the contest (people had to submit designs) were absolutely outstanding, and head-and-shoulders above this one. The explanation of what's in this pedal can be found here: **The DIYStompboxes 10-Year Anniversary Contest Thread**

 

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Isn't the Shin Ei the same circuit as the Ibanez Standard Fuzz? I have a clone of the latter, and it's an absolute monster. I have it engaged during the heavy parts of this song. <iframe width="100%" height="300" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src=" https://soundcloud.com/track_id%3D266510158 "></iframe>
Yes and no.

The Ibanez Standard Fuzz is a terrific unit. But it is not the same thing as the FY-2. It is yet one more version of the Shin-Ei circuit that constitutes the Univox Superfuzz, where the FY-2 is a simple 2-transistor fuzz, very similar in structure to the Mosrite Fuzz-Rite, Orpheum fuzz, and a few others not deliberately designed to generate octave-up. There are some 10-12 different pedals from the late 60's and early 70's, going under different brand names, that replicate the basic Superfuzz circuit. This includes the Honey, Acetone, Kay, Royal, Bruno, Lord, Mica, and others. They tend to differ a little in the "front end". That is, the first one or two transistors prior to the point in the circuit where the phase-split, used for producing various degrees of octaving, occurs. As the Kay exemplifies, they do not all use the 2-position tone switch, but many do, as illustrated with the Standard Fuzz. That switch introduces a midscoop that appears to exaggerate the bottom and top by removing the mids, or else lets everything pass unobstructed, with a couple of resistors used to keep the filtered and unfiltered volume levels roughly equal.

The Shin-Ei FY-2 also uses a midscoop filter, and comparisons in how the larger Superfuzz circuit and Companion sound probably comes from that. But, as noted above, the principal difference occurs with the Superfuzz circuit aiming for frequency-doubling. Within the larger family of octave-up fuzzes, I find the Superfuzz circuit tends to come up kind of short, in comparison to other designs, like the Foxx Tone Machine and Mayer Octavia, but at least its attempt to produce octaving yields an interesting fuzz.

Some Superfuzzes include a little trimmer pot on the board to tweak for optimum octaving, while many do not. The Standard Fuzz does not include this.
 
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