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Discussion Starter #1
I need to get a new garden shed. Our existing one is a wooden structure that has seen better days...a lot of them, and seems to have provided a handy burrow roof for a variety of varmints. It also blocks a potential entrance to the yard, and is so bloody dark I can never seem to find anything. So, I'm in the market for a new one.

My choices will be constrained by the measurement requirements. Because of the location of a major tree and a fence, I need something 8x6 or 10x6, with the door opening on the long side. Did the circuit today - Rona, Canadian Tire, Lowe's - but still need to hit HOme Depot, as well as see if there are any shed specialists in town.

The material used has an impact on the price bracket, but I have little sense of what the relative advantages and disadvantages of different shed materials, construction style, roof arrangements, etc., are. I also need to know more about what goes down first, before the shed. I spent a good chunk of the day carving up and removing a spruce hedge whose best days are behind it. I still need to remove more of the stumps and root structure, but I'll do that when my hands heal up a bit. But the point is that it will be installed over top of a former live hedge.

I'm open to suggestion. No particular bias other than wanting light, and wanting to save a bit of coin.
 

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Not sure if this is of any help, but my grandmother had one of those pre-fab plastic sheds you can get at Canadian Tire, Walmart, ect (I don't know where she got hers).

The winter after she died the house was essentially vacant while we were cleaning out her house. There was a lot of snow that year, and by the time we realized we should have cleaned the snow off the roof, it was too late. The sheer weight had buckled the sides so it was now resembling a mushroom or Smurf house.

I guess what I'm saying is if you go plastic, keep an eye on the snow in the winter and don't let it pile up.
 

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not inclined to build one yourself? you could try this.
ask around to people you know. see if any of them have a brother/cousin/friend who is a carpenter. see if they will do it on the side. there are also lots of kits you might consider.
 

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If you're building a wooden platform to set it on, filling the frame up with gravel before attaching the pressure-treated plywood floor will help keep critters from moving in underneath. I'd get as much of the hedge roots etc out of there as possible & lay landscaping fabric down under the shed as well. If you want it well lit, you can dig a trench to it & bury a suitably rated power cable for lights/plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
not inclined to build one yourself? you could try this.
ask around to people you know. see if any of them have a brother/cousin/friend who is a carpenter. see if they will do it on the side. there are also lots of kits you might consider.
I take it this means your vote is for a wooden shed?
 

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I'll snap a photo of my old shed. I loved it. I miss the walk up to it.

The same company that put it together for me also sells bunkies.

You can get one with an overhang so you can chill out and stare at your garden when it's raining blah blah blah.

L

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They're like tiny little rooms that you would add to Cottage or something that people can sleep in when there's overflow

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Discussion Starter #15
They're like tiny little rooms that you would add to Cottage or something that people can sleep in when there's overflow
Okay. Gotcha. I gather they can almost serve as "granny flats". Big enough yard, but not really enough serviceable room out back for anything like that. As I say, 8x6 or 10x6. Some of those "bunkies" look awful nice, though. And it would mean my older son could move all his various tool-tables (saw, router, etc.) to something like that and give me back my garage.
 
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I would build it too. I have, for my brother, out of recycled lumber from people wanting their fences/decks/sheds torn down (kijiji).
If you're not comfortable with your skills, before hiring someone, check with your local high school's shop class.
Ask them if their students are interested in a project for credit?
Do you need to have a building permit for a bunkie?
Not in Mark's case. Permits are required for anything over 100 sq ft (eg; 10 x 10).
 

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I bought a prefab/ They make it at their shop and then pull it partly apart. Then they bring it and install in the backyard a few weeks later. Takes the about 4 hours to setup. Custom shed custom colors. I added electrical later. 10 x12 deep low gable
Check kijiji for someplace like this in you area.

Pricing | GrandRiverSheds.
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Discussion Starter #19
That's a nice one. From the looks of the other homes, I gather you're somewhere within walking distance of Gage park? Either there, or in Westdale.

I already built a playhouse "bunkie" for our younger son. Unfortunately, by the time it was complete, he was in high school and too tall to fit inside, so we use it to store patio furniture. As much as I love to make things, I would like for this exercise not to stretch out over two summers. I need to have something built and usable, so I can transfer all the stuff in the existing one in order to have the existing one empty and suitable for demolition before the end of the summer.

Apart from cost, what are the pros and cons of plastic, resin, wooden, and corrugated metal structures?

Is there any sort of advantage or disadvantage to having one that comes with a floor, as opposed to not having one?
 
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Is there any sort of advantage or disadvantage to having one that comes with a floor, as opposed to not having one?
If you go for a wood framed/plywood floor, do as mentioned earlier, gravel in the pockets (critters).
Or a patio stone floor?
Won't have to worry about the former bush roots pushing up.
 
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