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Discussion Starter #1
"It was 40 years ago today (June 1st, 1967), Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play".

It was a great album and has been voted the best album of the rock era many times by many polls over the years since it debuted. Do you think it is the best Beatle album or do you have another favorite?

Or is there another album by another band that you think should hold this honor?
 

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I thought Rubber Soul was a really good album, Revolver was awesome.

But Sgt Pepper changed everything. It was so far beyond anything else.
 

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you must take into consideration that in 1967 nothing like sgt. pepper had ever been heard. dark side of the moon was also some what of a inspirational shock, but sgt. pepper was basically the first of it's kind since in 1967 studio technology wasn't as advanced as it was in the early 70s. this album was an important part of psychedelic 67 as well as Pink Floyd's first album, A Piper At The Gates Of Dawn(which i believe is their best). DSOTM is an excellent album and I've enjoyed it for years. I can't compare it to those two psychedelic masterpieces though. abbey road studios was definately ahead of it's time in the late 60s. I hope that they issue a mono edition cd or something for it's 40th anniversary. the mono version of sgt. pepper is slightly different and has some things you can't hear in the stereo edition.

all in all, I can't believe it's been 40 years since the summer of love.
 

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Sgt. Pepper would be my pick Lester, did you by any chance see the Paul McCartney special on "Great Performances" I think it was called "Chaos & Creation at Abbey Road". It was done in the original studio, just Paul noodling around on various instruments and explaining how they put together their music back in the 60's. It was fascinating and very entertaining, and I came away with a whole new appreciation for McCarneys talents.
 

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Here is a list of some of them.

Younger Than Yesterday - The Byrds
Mellow Yellow - Donovan
The Doors - The Doors (debut)
Between the Buttons - The Rolling Stones
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band - The Beatles
Buffalo Springfield - Buffalo Springfield (debut)
Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits - Bob Dylan
The Grateful Dead - The Grateful Dead
The Velvet Underground and Nico - The Velvet Underground
Are You Experienced? - The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Absolutely Free - The Mothers of Invention
Little Games - The Yardbirds
Disraeli Gears - Cream
Strange Days - The Doors
John Wesley Harding - Bob Dylan
After Bathing At Baxter's Jefferson Airplane
Days of Future Passed - The Moody Blues
Blowin' Your Mind! - Van Morrison
Procol Harum - Procol Harum
Their Satanic Majesties Request - Rolling Stones
The Who Sell Out - The Who
Safe as Milk - Captain Beefheart
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sgt. Pepper would be my pick Lester, did you by any chance see the Paul McCartney special on "Great Performances" I think it was called "Chaos & Creation at Abbey Road". It was done in the original studio, just Paul noodling around on various instruments and explaining how they put together their music back in the 60's. It was fascinating and very entertaining, and I came away with a whole new appreciation for McCarneys talents.
I'm not sure if it was that show or Classic Albums that had George Martin explaining how some of it was done. Just two 4-track machines I think.

Paul gets dissed a lot these days but he is really the most talented of all the Beatles. Paul was the highlight and John was the shadow. They had that necessary contrast that made them such a good songwriting team. McCartney almost never used minor keys. If you hear a minor, its a 80% chance that its a Lennon part. A song like "We Can Work It Out" shows how well they were matched. Paul wrote the verse part, and the middle eight "life is very short" section switches to a minor key by John. Classic Lennon-McCartney songwriting. In my opinion, neither one ever trumped what they wrote together in the Beatles, in their solo work.
 

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That was also the year that a song was labeled an "acid rock" song for the Byrds hit "Eight Miles High", and in my mind would be a hit even if it was released for the first time today - but probably wouldn't get any airplay because it wasn't hiphop or pop or whatever passes for MOR these days.
 

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Actually for the past couple of years now, Paul's been getting a lot more respect from people. He's been my main inspiration for songwriting and vocals. As far as them not trumping what they did in the Beatles check out the "Band On The Run" album by Paul and John's "Walls And Bridges" album. The songs on those albums are as good as anything they did while they were in the Beatles. BTW I've seen Paul in concert 3 times over the years. The first time was at (what used to be called) the Skydome in 1989, then at Exhibition Stadium in 1993 and the Air Canada Centre in 2002. Each time he sounded amazing and he always gives a great performance. You walk away from the show feeling inspired and re-energized.

I'm not sure if it was that show or Classic Albums that had George Martin explaining how some of it was done. Just two 4-track machines I think.

Paul gets dissed a lot these days but he is really the most talented of all the Beatles. Paul was the highlight and John was the shadow. They had that necessary contrast that made them such a good songwriting team. McCartney almost never used minor keys. If you hear a minor, its a 80% chance that its a Lennon part. A song like "We Can Work It Out" shows how well they were matched. Paul wrote the verse part, and the middle eight "life is very short" section switches to a minor key by John. Classic Lennon-McCartney songwriting. In my opinion, neither one ever trumped what they wrote together in the Beatles, in their solo work.
 

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I know Sgt. Pepper is a classic but... I alway's loved Revolver and Rubber Soul so much more. Still a great album though.
 

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I agree 100% with you Sesroh. I mentioned that Paul was my main inspiration for songwriting, well George is my main guitar influence, along with Elliot Easton of The Cars.
george harrison = very underrated guitar player. he was amazing
 

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I'm not sure if it was that show or Classic Albums that had George Martin explaining how some of it was done. Just two 4-track machines I think.

Paul gets dissed a lot these days but he is really the most talented of all the Beatles. Paul was the highlight and John was the shadow. They had that necessary contrast that made them such a good songwriting team. McCartney almost never used minor keys. If you hear a minor, its a 80% chance that its a Lennon part. A song like "We Can Work It Out" shows how well they were matched. Paul wrote the verse part, and the middle eight "life is very short" section switches to a minor key by John. Classic Lennon-McCartney songwriting. In my opinion, neither one ever trumped what they wrote together in the Beatles, in their solo work.

Yeah they did use the 4-tracks, and also a Mellitron (not sure of the spelling) which was probably a first generation synthesizer, interesting stuff!

If you're interested more information on this show it was on PBS Great Performances, they have some background info on their website. One bit that I really loved was when Paul did a verse or two of "Heartbreak Hotel" while playing the original double bass that Bill Black used when he played with Elvis, very cool!!

I never realized that Paul doesn't use minor keys, I will listen for that for sure.

I also agree with 'sesroh', George was very underrated as a guitarist IMHO, there was something special and unique about his playing style.
 

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Revolver.....Sgt Pepper

Both great albums but my opinion is that Abbey Road is the cats meow........
"I want you (she's so heavy) is one of the baddest riffs ever.......
 

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That was also the year that a song was labeled an "acid rock" song for the Byrds hit "Eight Miles High", and in my mind would be a hit even if it was released for the first time today - but probably wouldn't get any airplay because it wasn't hiphop or pop or whatever passes for MOR these days.
acid rock :)

They've said that Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds initials (LSD) was merely a coincidence.

yeah, right.
 

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Well, Paul wrote "Eleanor Rigby" which is in the key of E minor. There are probably others but I can't think of any right now. BTW speaking of Mellotrons, I was at the Beatles celebration last September down on the CNE grounds here in Toronto and one of the things they were demonstrating was a Mellotron and you should see the tape mechanism that thing takes! It had to be at least the size of a good computer desk if not larger. The guy was saying that the Mellotron they were demonstrating was one of the "lighter" ones. They actually wanted to bring another one along but it weighed 500 pounds.

Yeah they did use the 4-tracks, and also a Mellitron (not sure of the spelling) which was probably a first generation synthesizer, interesting stuff!

If you're interested more information on this show it was on PBS Great Performances, they have some background info on their website. One bit that I really loved was when Paul did a verse or two of "Heartbreak Hotel" while playing the original double bass that Bill Black used when he played with Elvis, very cool!!

I never realized that Paul doesn't use minor keys, I will listen for that for sure.

I also agree with 'sesroh', George was very underrated as a guitarist IMHO, there was something special and unique about his playing style.
 
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