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Looks like I'll get some good deals on dress shirts for work. Sucks to see them go though, I have shopped there for years as has my family.
 

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History repeats itself,... (Remember Eatons?)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I remember Woodward's too....... I loved that store.

Anybody else lay awake at night, wondering how "The Bay" stays in business?
The Bay stores I go into always seem busy when I'm at them.

Who knows....maybe they'll go in the next five to ten years?
 

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Sears was my mother's store. The only card she had was a Sears card and always paid it off before the end of the month. Everything from clothing to appliances and lawn mowers and so on. She passed away in 2010 at age 91,
 
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With the exception of Wal-Mart and Loblaws, the days of the "everything" department store are numbered. We've seen a parade of them come and go in Canada. Not only Sears and Eatons, but Woolco, K-Mart, Towers, Miracle Mart, Woodwards, and a slew of others. I don't know how much longer The Bay can stay afloat.

I've likely mentioned it here before, but we actually have a "Zellers" nearby**. The site used to be a conventional Zellers, but I gather neither Target nor Walmart wanted the property (It is part of a larger structure with a large-ish Loblaws), so the building was never sold. It appears The Bay held onto it, kept the sign, and sells their surplus stock through that outlet. Initially, one could get some nice things fairly cheap there. I think I bought some good Clark's shoes for under $40. Over time, the prices edged up, although there are still some bargains to be had.

I wonder if Sears would condense their inventory to a few central sites. There wouldn't be very many, if any, customers for their property holdings. Walmart is not going to want anything with more than 1 storey; just not their style, and malls where Sears was the anchor store are generally not going to have the clientele that would support any of the American chains that have been testing the Canadian waters (Nordstrom, etc.). So they won't likely be able to sell off their real estate all that quickly.

Maybe it's time for IKEA micro-stores?

** You can just make out the sign here. As is common to Streetview, the actual facility is not quite as big as the photo would suggest: Google Maps
 

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I always had a Sears card and used it for all major appliance and furniture purchases. I was bumbed when they got out of the credit card business. Everything in my house is Kenmore except the furnace.


I'd like to see Kohl's come to Canada. But after Target crashed and burned here, I doubt we'll see anything like that happen.
 

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I encourage yourself and others to read this fascinating, and well-written, cautionary tale: The Crazy Story of What Really Went Wrong at Target Canada

Interestingly, there are a lot of parallels between what went wrong with Target's entry into Canada, and the problems the feds are having with the Phoenix pay system. I still don't understand how two businesses so heavily invested in the catalog-shopping business (Eaton's and Sears) could have failed to adapt to the online shopping landscape. Maybe it was the fact that they had done business the same way for so long that impeded their adaptability.
 

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History repeats itself,... (Remember Eatons?)
Not to mention Woodward's in BC and Alberta. Plus the Bay is owned by Lord and Taylor the last 15 years or so.

I guess online shopping is taking a bigger bite out of the stores than I thought. I use Amazon and a few other online stores because it's usually so damn convenient. Wouldn't buy shoes or guitars online though! :)
 

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Perhaps the new retail model is the dep't store cleverly disguised as a food store. I see Walmart and Loblaw's/Superstore as a couple of examples. Plenty of clothing and household goods available.
Canadian Tire, while not a food store or traditional dep't store, has remained healthy and competitive.
 

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Perhaps the new retail model is the dep't store cleverly disguised as a food store. I see Walmart and Loblaw's/Superstore as a couple of examples. Plenty of clothing and household goods available.
Ya-cheap Chinese crap merchandise.

Canadian Tire, while not a food store or traditional dep't store, has remained healthy and competitive.
Canada Tire also owns Mark's Work Wearhouse. (Real clothes for real people)

London Drugs is doing well too.
 

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