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I really don't care what they do in hallways or between classes/on lunch hours...but definitely inappropriate in classrooms. in my day it was Sony Walkman(s) or handheld video games.
 

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I dunno, I feel there is a missed opportunity to provide an education based on real life as in how to behave in public and in general.
I know there is the argument that this is the role of parents but from my perspective, when adults can't control themselves, it ends up as a self perpetuating endless spiral of stupidity where everyone pays.

Schools don't provide much in the way of life skills as it is. I just look at the silly way they deal with time students spend in class. Pro-D days seemingly every other week, ridiculous schemes to "save" time by knocking a minute or two off lunch so the school can save money over the course of the year.
Schools are meant for learning I had always believed.
 

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I'm only surprised it took this long for someone to clue in. I laughed out loud when I heard they were going to allow them a few years ago. Duh!

I also had to laugh a few years ago when I took a day off work during the week to go skiing. It was full of school kids. Learning how to socialize i guess.
 

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I dunno, I feel there is a missed opportunity to provide an education based on real life as in how to behave in public and in general.
I know there is the argument that this is the role of parents but from my perspective, when adults can't control themselves, it ends up as a self perpetuating endless spiral of stupidity where everyone pays.

Schools don't provide much in the way of life skills as it is. I just look at the silly way they deal with time students spend in class. Pro-D days seemingly every other week, ridiculous schemes to "save" time by knocking a minute or two off lunch so the school can save money over the course of the year.
Schools are meant for learning I had always believed.
the problem is, a lot of kids don't view school as an opportunity to learn, they see it as time they have to put in, so motivating them to fly straight can be difficult in the presence of more stimulating distractions. id like to think my kids teachers can be teaching them stuff like math instead of the wasted time disciplining over cellphones.
 
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I personally don't think kids should have a cellphone any-wheres near them at school. Cellphones have bred a modern attitude of "Always Available" that has never existed before in life. Hell, I am 33 and it did not exist when I was in high school! So people now are short on patience and miss out on whats going on in the lives of people around them. When I take my kids to the play park I run around and play with them and usually end up playing with another kid as well, while their parent is sitting on a bench engrossed in Bejeweled or whatever. Its ridiculous. I hope to do my part in ending the cycle by showing my kids that my phone is a communications device and not a thing to keep me occupied 24/7.

Rant over!
 

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I worked at a school and there was no cell phones allowed during lunch and recess. All cell phone activity was supervised and taking photos and using social media was not allowed either.

The reason.

Children who are being protected from an abusive parent. A photo and a caption on social media can actually put someones life at risk and very easy to track down.

I doubt that happens often, but once would be too many times.
 

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I suspect their may be an explosion of Student Councillor jobs, with kids melting down left, right and center. Five minutes is too long to go without knowing what all their friends are doing, they're going to be babbling idiots by lunch time. And the parents will support them and not the school: "Little Johnny needs his positive 'like' affirmations or he won't adapt socially."
 

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A little Devil's Advocate...why ban them in classrooms? Shouldn't students be doing school work while they are in the classroom? If students have time to text and Facebook during class time then that's something that should be addressed before a "tech ban", no?

I believe the saying goes something like this...idle hands are the devil's workshop...give them something constructive to do so they don't do something destructive/disruptive. Easier said than done, I know, but banning stuff rarely gives you the desired results.
 

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A little Devil's Advocate...why ban them in classrooms? Shouldn't students be doing school work while they are in the classroom? If students have time to text and Facebook during class time then that's something that should be addressed before a "tech ban", no?

I believe the saying goes something like this...idle hands are the devil's workshop...give them something constructive to do so they don't do something destructive/disruptive. Easier said than done, I know, but banning stuff rarely gives you the desired results.
If it was not the case that most teachers these days have a very difficult time persuading students that what is being addressed in class is actually useful and of greater priority than what they see on their phones, I would agree with you. However, engagement in a 4" screen, as opposed to engagement in the class, is not at all a function of "idle hands" and lack of work to do. It is a function of a culture that gives priority to whatever money-spending adolescents deem to be of interest right this second. It is reflected in the news as much as in the classroom.

I'm hoping to go back to teaching university part-time once I retire in the fall. Since my last class-time was in 2002, I don't know what I'm going to do when faced with a room full of kids who won't look up and converse. I'm engaging enough as an instructor (cut my teeth being effervescent enough to keep people taking night classes awake until 10:00PM), but these will be hard habits to break and firmly entrenched in the students. Bad enough when I get on the bus and find I'm the only person actually looking out at the gorgeous scenery along the parkway, while everyone else has their nose buried in their phone.

I think the Friendly Giant said it best, when he declared: "Look up. Look waaaayyyyy up. And I'll call Rusty."

The schools and boards that are implementing this policy should make those same students wear a weighted belt or something throughout the entire school-day, so they can gather a sense of how heavy that mobile tether really is in their lives, and what a relief it is to finally take it off at the end of the day.
 

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I suspect their may be an explosion of Student Councillor jobs, with kids melting down left, right and center. Five minutes is too long to go without knowing what all their friends are doing, they're going to be babbling idiots by lunch time. And the parents will support them and not the school: "Little Johnny needs his positive 'like' affirmations or he won't adapt socially."

I just gave you a 'like' for this post ;)
 

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Students are allowed to use their devices during the lunch hour, he said, but they will not be allowed to access social media, take pictures and videos, or text – which a board spokesman admitted would be difficult to police.
This cracked me up. Good luck enforcing that. Teachers should be allowed to ban phone use in the classroom. Beyond that, I don't think it's a big deal.

My daughter is doing very well in school and she has a great social life, both online and in person. Kids incorporate these things into their lives and this is just part of being social and sharing amongst friends for them. The things we did as kids are different, but not necessarily better, than what kids are doing now. Sure, it bugs me to see her on her damn phone sometimes, but she's well-adjusted, has some very nice friends at both school and at her dance school and she has a very active and positive social life, so I don't see it as all that much of an issue.
 

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A little Devil's Advocate...why ban them in classrooms? Shouldn't students be doing school work while they are in the classroom? If students have time to text and Facebook during class time then that's something that should be addressed before a "tech ban", no?

I believe the saying goes something like this...idle hands are the devil's workshop...give them something constructive to do so they don't do something destructive/disruptive. Easier said than done, I know, but banning stuff rarely gives you the desired results.

They have things to do, they simply ignore them in favour of their phones.
 

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This cracked me up. Good luck enforcing that. Teachers should be allowed to ban phone use in the classroom. Beyond that, I don't think it's a big deal.

My daughter is doing very well in school and she has a great social life, both online and in person. Kids incorporate these things into their lives and this is just part of being social and sharing amongst friends for them. The things we did as kids are different, but not necessarily better, than what kids are doing now. Sure, it bugs me to see her on her damn phone sometimes, but she's well-adjusted, has some very nice friends at both school and at her dance school and she has a very active and positive social life, so I don't see it as all that much of an issue.
You're one of the fortunate parents. Good on ya. And yes, every class will have some kids who sit at the front, pay attention, ask questions, think about the class material, but aren't friendless nerds. It's the 90% who sit behind them that teachers still have to worry about.
 

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You're one of the fortunate parents. Good on ya. And yes, every class will have some kids who sit at the front, pay attention, ask questions, think about the class material, but aren't friendless nerds. It's the 90% who sit behind them that teachers still have to worry about.
I don't think it's fortunate, I bust my ass to make sure I try to teach her and my son how to live as responsible members of society. I think it's on the parents to teach their kids how to balance things out with responsibilities and fun. My daughter knows that when her discipline or focus goes, the phone goes. Not too long ago, I caught her on her phone after lights out and locked her out of all her apps for a week (so she was basically on text and talk). You should have seen her! :D

She juggles a very busy schedule between school and dance and she does it well, so if she wants to socialize on her phone, I let her. There have been a few times where I've had to step in and help her with managing her time and the phone actually makes it easy. Because there is so much socializing done via the device, shutting out the apps motivates her to remember her obligations.

Edit: I sound a bit arrogant here, sorry. I'm by no means a perfect parent and I would never claim to be so. I know there are many factors that affect what kids do and why they do it and I can't presume to know the circumstances of every family out there. I was just offering this as an example of the fact that even I can get my kid to somewhat balance things and I'm not exactly a model of moderation myself :D
 

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If it was not the case that most teachers these days have a very difficult time persuading students that what is being addressed in class is actually useful and of greater priority than what they see on their phones, I would agree with you. However, engagement in a 4" screen, as opposed to engagement in the class, is not at all a function of "idle hands" and lack of work to do. It is a function of a culture that gives priority to whatever money-spending adolescents deem to be of interest right this second. It is reflected in the news as much as in the classroom.
They have things to do, they simply ignore them in favour of their phones.
Again, make classroom time more engaging or at the very least more important and I suspect the issue resolves itself.

For example, have assignments/assessments due at the end of each class and therefore requiring students to do something productive during class time or else suffer the consequences...low grades. Some students won't care but that's par for the course and there isn't much you can do for students who aren't willing to do the work.
 

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Again, make classroom time more engaging or at the very least more important and I suspect the issue resolves itself.

For example, have assignments/assessments due at the end of each class and therefore requiring students to do something productive during class time or else suffer the consequences...low grades. Some students won't care but that's par for the course and there isn't much you can do for students who aren't willing to do the work.
There are some very real limits to that. Certainly at higher levels, where people are more likely to take courses about something they have some reasonable interest in, it is much easier to tug them away from their phones or laptops. At lower levels, however, where curriculum is defined for the instructor and student, and there is little latitude in what can be covered, the instructor is at a disadvantage in engaging students who do not already have a vested interest in possibly finding the material interesting. Dangling "grades" in front of those who don't really have much invested in educational attainment is not likely to be much of an incentive.

Of course that does not mean that what you encourage is in any sense "wrong". I'm just sceptical of its potential degree of success, under the circumstances.
 

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I don't think it's fortunate, I bust my ass to make sure I try to teach her and my son how to live as responsible members of society. I think it's on the parents to teach their kids how to balance things out with responsibilities and fun. My daughter knows that when her discipline or focus goes, the phone goes. Not too long ago, I caught her on her phone after lights out and locked her out of all her apps for a week (so she was basically on text and talk). You should have seen her! :D

She juggles a very busy schedule between school and dance and she does it well, so if she wants to socialize on her phone, I let her. There have been a few times where I've had to step in and help her with managing her time and the phone actually makes it easy. Because there is so much socializing done via the device, shutting out the apps motivates her to remember her obligations.

Edit: I sound a bit arrogant here, sorry. I'm by no means a perfect parent and I would never claim to be so. I know there are many factors that affect what kids do and why they do it and I can't presume to know the circumstances of every family out there. I was just offering this as an example of the fact that even I can get my kid to somewhat balance things and I'm not exactly a model of moderation myself :D
Preaching to the converted. Parenthood is a full time job, and must be treated as such. Unlike teachers, one doesn't get the summer off to plan out curriculum; you're on the job 365 a year (that'll teach you to have unprotected sex! :D).

Still, there are limits to what one's efforts can accomplish. I used to joke that there should be "temperament insurance", whereby one would pay premiums prior to the birth of a child, and in case the child's temperament turns out not to be a good fit with one's own, the policy would cover sending in someone to take over for a bit when your own patience and energy had run thin.

Ultimately, one's child is partly raised by their peers. They absorb the values and language of their peers, filtered through whatever the family has provided as a foundation. One fascinating study I read about 20 years back observed the beneficial effects of friends' parents on the adolescent. That's an interesting instance of children being positively influenced by more competent and wiser adults via the adolescent's choice of friends.

And if you're lucky, they pick the sort of friends that don't undo the hard work you've put in.

In any event, and more to the thrust of this thread, going "cold turkey" for 5-6 hours a day is not harmful to the child. The child can still be reached at school in case of emergencies, and if it allows the teacher to accomplish more, so much the better.
 

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We used to get a rap on the knuckles with a ruler if we weren't paying attention in class in public school. I am not saying that is right or wrong, but the class was quiet and everyone was paying attention. If you got sent to the principles office for bad behaviour you would get a smack on the palm with a leather strap. I only needed that to happen once. I changed my ways after that.
 
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