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He did a session at the new Long & McQuade in Orleans. Half playing, half telling stories, answering questions and giving tip and pointers.

His playing is literally supernatural. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing and hearing. He uses swells to sound just like a pedal steel. And his Tele playing at times is so fast and there are so many notes. I couldn’t wipe the smile off my face all night, It’s been a long time since I’ve been blown away like that with someone’s playing.

Does anyone have any good beginner ‘Chicken Pickin’ country lines or tips/pointers to share? I’d love to find a few country licks to incorporate into my box of tricks. I searched YouTube but I’m not going to listen to all those lessons without knowing which ones are good, I trust you guys though!



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The guy is definitely a monster player. As for the slower stuff and pedal steel licks, I wish he'd do a bit more of that. I heard him once live do a bit of the slower licks and I think he's got a real feel and soul for it. Unfortunately I think he's stuck in that 90's country guitar shredder phase that a lot of us guitarists went through. Ray Flake, Albert Lee, etc. Its not that popular anymore even though there are guitarists that can play like that. Locally Paul Chapman (Chappy) or Brent Mason from Nashville. Actually there are a lot players that play like that in Nashville. Unfortunately all we get on the radio for country nowadays is recycled classic rock guitar. For speed and finesse in Canada I don't think any are better than Steve.
Here is Steve doing Brent Masons Hot wired.
If I had one criticism I think if he did more double stops it might make his solos more interesting. His solos seem to go for maximum speed making all the notes in to one solid never ending phrase with some bends thrown in. But I guess there are enough country shredders out there with the double stops and this is what makes Steve sound unique.


One of my favorite Brent Mason solos:

 

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Incredible musician and a super nice guy to boot. I shared guitar and steel duties with him 2 years ago in Carp Ont. I was just so in awe of his playing. A great Canadian talent.
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Let me say that he only played enough fast stuff to get my heart racing. Probably 60% of what he played was slow. I have never heard or seen someone do anything like what I saw last night. At one point he said he'd play some steel guitar, then he used his volume pedal to play his Tele just like a steel guitar. He was bending chords, I don't even know what I was hearing and seeing. It was really incredible, he's a masterful musician. I hope I get a chance to see him again.
 

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Incredible musician and a super nice guy to boot. I shared guitar and steel duties with him 2 years ago in Carp Ont. I was just so in awe of his playing. A great Canadian talent.
I'm impressed! And yes, he was a super nice guy, he took the time to chat with everyone and told stories about Merle Haggard and George Jones.
 

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Who's the big boy who plays country and is blind? Now playing an EBMM?

I learnt that working man blues thing from him. I love it. I can't chicken pick, but I can kinda do that and I think it's a good place to start if you like the idea of implementing double-stops.
 

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Who's the big boy who plays country and is blind? Now playing an EBMM?

I learnt that working man blues thing from him. I love it. I can't chicken pick, but I can kinda do that and I think it's a good place to start if you like the idea of implementing double-stops.

Johnny Hiland, an amazing picker.

He was born legally blind but has to have some sight. I've seen a video of him demoing an amp and he can see the knobs on the amp.
 

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I'm impressed! And yes, he was a super nice guy, he took the time to chat with everyone and told stories about Merle Haggard and George Jones.
Yes, he told us stories also of playing bass with Tommy Hunter and Dolly Parton etc...He plays on a regular basis in the Trento area (home) and his band South Mountain. They are a treat to see also. Steve is a very giving person and he shows up at jams and plays with his old buddies in the Ottawa area. He tours Canada with Scott Woods (fiddle) and his band during the year.
 

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Yes, he told us stories also of playing bass with Tommy Hunter and Dolly Parton etc...He plays on a regular basis in the Trento area (home) and his band South Mountain. They are a treat to see also. Steve is a very giving person and he shows up at jams and plays with his old buddies in the Ottawa area. He tours Canada with Scott Woods (fiddle) and his band during the year.
Yeah I remember when he played bass for Tommy Hunter. I went to one of the shows in Guelph. Steve Petrie was the guitar player at the time. I never understood a player like Steve Petico playing bass. Steve Petrie is also a great guitar player but is no Petico. The only thing I could think of is that Petrie was a better fit for the style of Tommy Hunter. But I imagine anything Petrie could play Petico could.
 

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Who's the big boy who plays country and is blind? Now playing an EBMM?

I learnt that working man blues thing from him. I love it. I can't chicken pick, but I can kinda do that and I think it's a good place to start if you like the idea of implementing double-stops.
Would it be Johny Hilland?
 

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Incredible musician and a super nice guy to boot.
Strongly agree on both counts. Imitates a steam engine pretty well too!
Yeah I remember when he played bass for Tommy Hunter.
I drove the truck on a couple of those tours. The first one I met the tour in the Sault or Thunder Bay to finish the eastern leg and arrived at the venue just after the show ended. I was on stage starting to tear down when some guy I'd never seen jumps up on the stage and grabs Hunter's guitar. Nobody else seemed to notice so I started to go over to the guy and then he started playing... I had to stop so I didn't trip over my jaw which was suddenly on the floor!

Three Steves and a Jay on that tour, all super guys.
 

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Strongly agree on both counts. Imitates a steam engine pretty well too!

I drove the truck on a couple of those tours. The first one I met the tour in the Sault or Thunder Bay to finish the eastern leg and arrived at the venue just after the show ended. I was on stage starting to tear down when some guy I'd never seen jumps up on the stage and grabs Hunter's guitar. Nobody else seemed to notice so I started to go over to the guy and then he started playing... I had to stop so I didn't trip over my jaw which was suddenly on the floor!

Three Steves and a Jay on that tour, all super guys.
Great story. Thanks for sharing
 
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