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I guess it's kind of cool (except that really, it's not that hard to tune a guitar...) - I wonder what the price tag on that will be?
 

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Well, the reality is, if you can't tune a guitar, you probably shouldn't play one.
The concept of this guitar is the ability to do alternate tunings by turning a knob, which I guess Gibson copied from the VG Strat! The fact that it stays in tune is a bonus.
 

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yup, it's very simple to tune a gee-tar alright.
mind U, for those 'between song' moments on stage it'd be really cool to push a button and strum the guitar and have it automatically tune itself. pretty frickin' cool if U ask me.
i wonder how neck heavy it is, tho'? i find lesters w/ grover tuners a bit neck heavy.
 
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which I guess Gibson copied from the VG Strat
Yes and no. The VG Strat's alternate tunings are digitally altered versions of the notes. You're hearing the hex pickup when you use an alternate tunings on the VG Strat. The Gibson approach changes the physical tuning of the guitar. Sort of the same, sort of not.
 

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I appears that you can also intonate the guitar in addition to just tuning it.
 

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If the price is right, I'd love to have such a device on every stringed instrument I own.


Fantastic in my opinion. One less thing to worry about and based on how few players I hear who are really in tune, a service to mankind.
 

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I love the idea. Not that tuning is necessarily hard, but it can be time consuming - especially when restringing. I'd rather be playing my guitar instead of fooling with the tuning.

That said, I think cost will be the ultimate factor in how successful the Robot Guitar ultimately is. If they can keep the cost down, this could really become pretty mainstream. Otherwise, the Robot Guitar will used primarily by pro musicians who want something that can be retuned quickly onstage and that will automatically create alternate tunings.
 

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Once I got beyond the gee whiz gosh darn wonderment of it all, hoping to take my guitars into the 21st century, it did occur to me that it looks like just another gadget to fail, be expensive to replace or repair, and cause my blood to boil. Not that any of that has ever stopped me before, LOL.

Dylan went electric, did he?

Peace, Mooh.
 

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Well, the reality is, if you can't tune a guitar, you probably shouldn't play one.
The concept of this guitar is the ability to do alternate tunings by turning a knob, which I guess Gibson copied from the VG Strat! The fact that it stays in tune is a bonus.
Well the concept of a self tuning guitar has been a in the making since the early 1900's lol. I dont think anyone would buy this guitar just cause they cant tune a guitar in. Just a real nifty feature at a price tag of probley around 5000 lol.

Myself when I seen the video's of it I got scared lol tuners moving by themselfs....*shifty eyes*
 

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not as expensive as i thought, 2500us...

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-11/15/content_7081187.htm

New Gibson robot electric guitar tunes itself
www.chinaview.cn 2007-11-15 16:30:26 Print

BEIJING, Nov. 15 (Xinhuanet) -- Just imagine, a robot guitar that tunes itself. Well, you don't have to imagine because after 15 years of research Gibson Guitar is launching a limited edition Les Paul Robot Guitar in December that has players expressing enthusiasm and skepticism.

"It will not make you a better guitar player but it will allow the average player to access some very sophisticated tunings," Gibson Guitar Chief Executive Henry Juszkiewicz told Reuters on Tuesday.

The six nonstandard preset tunings were used on hits ranging from "Honky Tonk Women" by The Rolling Stones and Hendrix's "Voodoo Child" to Led Zeppelin's "Going to California" and Joni Mitchell's "The Circle Game."

Gibson says the robot guitar is aimed at amateurs who have a hard time keeping their guitars in tune, as well as professionals who now use technicians during concerts to keep about 100 guitars tuned to different keys.

Temperature variations, changing strings and simply playing the instrument have long been tuning challenges for guitarists with even the best musical ear. Gibson said the robot guitar is the biggest advance in electric guitar design in more than 70 years.

But some have already poured scorn on the robot guitar.

"I'm sorry, this is just lazy. With stuff like this, tuning is going to be a lost skill," wrote LettheBassPlay on the www.ultimate-guitar.com website forum.

Gibson said the robot guitar is the biggest advance in electric guitar design in more than 70 years.

Gibson will launch 4,000 limited edition, blue silverburst Les Gibson Robot Guitars around the world on December 7 at a price in the region of 2,500 U.S. dollars. It expects to roll out a standard robot edition starting in January 2008.

(Agencies)
Editor: Gareth Dodd
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Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.
 
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