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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Have a mature Rose bush I chopped down last Fall to attempt to remove the bulb. Problem is, it's in a tight ass space with an interlocking and glued wall one one side and a newer built fence on the other side. We intended to keep it, but after it started growing under the wall......removal time. The bulb is right up against the wall and I've dug a good sized trench around it by watering the soil and hacking and cutting some of the root system out already.

I don't want to damage the wall if possible, so if any of you guys that are farmers, acreage owners, outdoorsmen, mountain climbers, gardeners, or explosive experts can give me a few ideas I would VERY much appreciate it. All I've used is a spade for tight areas, a hatchet and my hands. I'm thinking there is some tool that'll uproot it, but I'm not into putting too much cash out at the moment...if any. I'd rather a DIY solution but......

Right of wall - Main Bulb Left of wall - fairly heavy root system.

 

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Do you want to grow anything in that location in the near future?

If not, one possible solution is to cover it with a layer of softener salt (or similar) cover it up and water it. Don't ask me how I discovered this.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You think something like this guy does might do the trick
Do you want to grow anything in that location in the near future?

If not, one possible solution is to cover it with a layer of softener salt (or similar) cover it up and water it. Don't ask me how I discovered this.
I have part of the garden that had the Raspberry bushes sectioned of for 1 Tomato plant. It's about where I'm standing in the picture. So for that area, yes I'm growing something. For the rest of the area, not this year. But I plan on making it another Tomato area next year. Does that softener salt seep into the other part of the soil? I could put up a wood barrier between the 2 sections. I'm trying to keep the soil conditions as clean and pure as possible as it's very rich soil...till I hit the clay about a foot or more down.
 

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Can you just use Roundup and remove what's left when it's good and dead?

That's of course if you don't want to grow anything there for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Can you just use Roundup and remove what's left when it's good and dead?

That's of course if you don't want to grow anything there for a while.
I used Roundup last Fall. It pretty much killed everything, but the main issue is removing that f**king stump. I did just find an idea on Youtube I hadn't thought of, so I'm going to try it. Typcial way of digging 2' around would've worked if it was an open area t


EDIT: Doesn't seem very effective in my case.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You might try burning it out.
Naw. Too close to the house, fence and Gas Line running right beside the fence line. You can see the BBQ one from the house on the lower right of the pic. There's also the main line running along the fence line on the top of the pic. Plus Edmonton has a Fire ban I think due to the hot weather.....I'm thinking about clearing more dirt way and taking a circular saw to it. Start cutting it out in wedges maybe.
 

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Shaped charges.

Actually, a Sawzall is a great tool for this. Buy cheap, aggressive, short-medium blades. And you have to get the foot of the tool firmly on the root or you'll just vibrate your fillings loose. The idea being that you excavate around the root system as much as possible, cut all the outward reaching roots you can with the saw, and then pry or tug out (preferably with a truck & chain) the main tap root.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Shaped charges.

Actually, a Sawzall is a great tool for this. Buy cheap, aggressive, short-medium blades. And you have to get the foot of the tool firmly on the root or you'll just vibrate your fillings loose. The idea being that you excavate around the root system as much as possible, cut all the outward reaching roots you can with the saw, and then pry or tug out (preferably with a truck & chain) the main tap root.
I used a Reciprocating saw when it was a bit bigger but maybe I should try it again. I didn't actually get the foot on the root at the time, so that's a great suggestion that I'll try. Hopefully with better effect with a different blade. Thanks.
 

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Sorry if this is a stupid question, but if it's dead (roundup), why do you need to remove it? You want to put something else there?
 

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I think you gotta just keep digging and hacking, man.
theres a line of tools called brushgrubbers but I don't think theyd work well in such a tight spot esp with that little wall there. they grip real well, but you still have to come up with the pulling force.
BrushGrubber | Brush Grubber Products

next time plant miniature roses in a small spot like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Bump and an update. So after I made this thread last Spring I decided to pour some round up in and around the area. They were coming back up in the mid summer, even after I destroyed the root. Or so I thought. So I proceeded to pour another 1/4 can in to hopefully take care of the new sprouts. This past weekend I snapped a piece of wood right of the main bulb, so now I figure she's cooked. The roots are easy to break through at htis point, so as I thought of various suggestions here, I caught this on youtube.

Looks like a good trick.

 

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I've used my chainsaw with an old sharpened chain on it. Get all the dirt you can away from the root and go to town on it. A power washer might help remove the dirt. And don't forget eye protection if you try this. You don't have to completely remove every bit of the root if you used Roundup or another root killer. What's left will rot.
 

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Yes, the salt will spread into the surrounding area.

The drill and spade bit idea looks like it should be easy to try.
I've used my chainsaw with an old sharpened chain on it. Get all the dirt you can away from the root and go to town on it. A power washer might help remove the dirt. And don't forget eye protection if you try this. You don't have to completely remove every bit of the root if you used Roundup or another root killer. What's left will rot.
I was thinking sawsall. Done that before for roots.
 
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