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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, I seem to have a slight problem with my higher frets, on the upper (thinner) three strings. The fret bars appear to be developing some little slits (like little grooves, and when I do bends, the catch in them for a split second. It doesn't effect the sound, it's just kind of annoying) where the strings get pushed against them. I know what has caused it, and that would be when I play with my slide (I used to actually push the slide into the strings instead of just resting it against them, I've learned my lesson and I've stopped doing it). Is there a way someone can redress frets themselves? Or is it best left to the professionals. If I can do it myself, whats involved? How do I do it. If it's better left to a shop, how much (approx) would it cost me? Thanks everyone.
 

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I think you can get a kits for it and it seems relatively easy to do - but so do other things that seem to get all messed up before we let a pro handle it. LOL! Anyways, I had one of my guitars done and it plays great now. I think the cost was around $70. I can't remember the break down but I also had a graphite nut custom cut and installed as well. Total was around $140. Guitar plays like a dream now and no matter how much I bend the strings, it barely goes out of tune if at all.

Good luck.
 

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I'd probably pay a pro to do the work. Sometimes, all the frets need is to be re-levelled, which is just a bit of file work, and other times entire frets (perhaps all of them) need to be replaced. In either case, I'd trust myself to bugger them up, lol.
 

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A fret job entails a releveling of all the frets.

If you want to do it yourself, you can try to feather out the nicks with some 600 grit sand paper, but if you go too far with it you'll end up with dead frets and need the releveling job done at least.

Don't go any deeper than the current nicks and just smooth out the transitions, don't try to make them flat. If you can live with that and the little problems it will create you're all set. If it doesn't work out, your back to looking at a re-leveling job.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hmmm, I think for now I'll leave them alone. Atleast until I get some extra cash and can put the guitar in a shop, It needs to have a setup job on it anyways. Thanks everyone.
 

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I've fret leveled a few of my guitars, while it takes me a good 4-5 hours(mostly polishing and crowning) it sure is satisfying. I'll post a tutorial next time I do a guitar, wich shoudn't be too long from now:rockon:
 

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I wouldn't try it yourself unless you have a leveling file , crowning file and a way to buff & polish the frets when you are done. These tools are available but they will likely cost you more than just getting it done. It can also take a lot of time to get everything adjusted just right once you've done the initial job.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, I'm just going to put it in a shop. I need a bunch done to it anyways. Once I'm done sanding off the gloss I'm going to have to setup properly, the frets redone and all that stuff. I may have my pickups adjusted. I highly doubt I'll do it myself.
 

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fret levelling is real easy ... try it out. As others have said you'll need to get some tools. Also I would suggest buying Dan Erlewine's fret basics video and some cheap import necks t practice on.

If you do not have interest in learning then it is far cheaper to pay a pro. Also, do not do your favorite guitar until you've practiced on a few cheap necks.

Like anything else you have to get your hands dirty to understand the concept. Once you do its simple.

Most players will only need a dress every few years if ever. I have never in my life worn out frets. (some guys play with a kung fu grip - I dont, the intonation problems - yikes) In the end learning to do it will cost more then its worth for the average guy. The satisfaction can be great though.

Refrets are another story. There's many so called repair guys out there that botch these on a daily basis. This takes lots of practice/patience, not a bottle of glue and the same tang for every job.
 
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