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Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow musicians and gear junkies!

I posted this on a few other forums but want to try here -

A few months back, I acquired two microphones that were referred to as “overhead-choir, mini-condenser” microphones (about the size of your pinky finger)! One day while monitoring with headphones, I placed one (and later, two) inside the guitar and started noodling (seeing how the mic sounded).

I was TOTALLY blown away by how good this sounded (potentially better than the piezo pickups currently installed). So with this new thread, I wanted opinions on where I might place these microphones? Preferable inside the guitar, but I might consider outside mount if not in the way.

Comments? Advice?
 

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First, piezzo and mic are different technology and the sound they deliver does not compare : that is why many will use combo of both of them.

Mic, the size of a dime, are generally glued inside the guitar, under bridge, mostly nearby string blocking pins.
As an image is worth more than words, I suggest you look at "k&k pure mini country".
 

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Yeah I was going to say the same thing about K&K.

They have an internal mic set up which works with their piezo pickup.

Have a look on their website to see what they say about mounting/positioning their internal microphone.
 

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Inside microphones are usually around the sound hole “looking up”. The one you describe is not meant to live inside a guitar and might be problematic installation wise as well as sound wise. There are many dedicated for this purpose but a good one is not cheap and might be tricky to install for some (end jack especially). Anyway good luck if you try and mount yours in. Cheers.
 

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I realize I drew the gun fast...
Forgot Rainsong is a different bird : carbon instead of wood, ain't it ?
So, making holes...

Got an Amplitube mic last year : you just clip it on the rim of the soundhole.
Worth a try I guess before you have to drill a hole at bottom side for a jack
 

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Aside from the physical mounting challenges, a "hanging choir" microphone is likely (I am making some assumptions because you don't give us a model#) the wrong tool for the following reasons:

1) you will require a balanced connection with phantom power

2) omni polar pattern mics are preferred as they have no proximity effect and are less susceptible to handling noise

3) you do not want a heavy cylindrical metal torpedo bouncing around inside your guitar

4) a microphone inside the guitar reveals a different sound than one sensibly mounted or placed outside.
 

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I saw an article in a magazine a number of years ago (possibly Acoustic Guitar) regarding internal mic placement.
In their opinion the sweet spot was around 4:00 to 5:00 (if the neck is noon) about 3 to 4 cm away from the edge of the sound hole and 2 to 3 cm below the soundboard, facing the soundboard.
 

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If you use two faced tape and move it around you will find what you like. Get the tape from the dollar store.
Once yo find where it sounds the best remove the tape and install the mics permanently.
I have used this method many times and it works great.

Just make sure yo don't keep the tape on too long (Days) as it can be hard to remove over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I actually went through with this. The reason is, I have already owned every single dual source microphone and Piezo combo that is made. They are all great. But when I did this experiment with the choir mics, regardless of their specs, my carbon fiber acoustic electric guitar, with no bracing inside the body and a hollow neck, seem to react quite well.

Granted, these choir mics might not be tailored for live use. But I intend to move the mics around with Velcro, and EQ and compress, appropriately. Also, each mic will feed into its own separate stereo lexicon processor. So I can do some interesting tracks with my master stereo signal.

As soon as I try some things, I will post some clips. By the way, the text that I hired did a great job. Exactly what I wanted. I will send photos.

If you care to see the guitar for this, google: EMERALD GUITAR RICHARD
 
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