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Maybe he just doesn't test well? I think this may speak as much to that as to any perceived problems with the test itself.

"What tripped him up was the oral comprehension portion, which involved analyzing a recorded conversation from different points of view, including its political content.

“We’re all human. We have different levels of concentration,” he said. “Anyone can make a mistake.”"
 

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Maybe he just doesn't test well?
knowing quebec , I'd say testers are extremely harsh on outsiders ....
like when they flunked that girl from france ...
for writing part of her thesis in english (nothing to do with her quebec french test)
it was later overturned when the news got out and the backlash started.

don't forget that quebec french has a lot of regional slang in it.

but , If you ain't "from there" or pure laine , they don't want you.
 

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knowing quebec , I'd say testers are extremely harsh on outsiders ....
like when they flunked that girl from france ...
for writing part of her thesis in english (nothing to do with her quebec french test)
it was later overturned when the news got out and the backlash started.

don't forget that quebec french has a lot of regional slang in it.

but , If you ain't "from there" or pure laine , they don't want you.
Fair enough,

Yeah, that's funny. It works both ways though. Many Parisians view Quebecois French as almost slang.

I can certainly hear the difference between the two.
 

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and phrases .... like the britsh for hood (bonnet), trunk (boot), etc
the pronunciation varies from british / northern states / southern states /canadian (eh).
 

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Would québécois be considered hillbilly french?
No more than Canadian English is hillbilly English.

I'll just add that, after spending several years in test development and maintaining professional contact for the last 20 years with people who develop tests for a living, lots of folks THINK they can design tests, just like lots of folks THINK they can design great surveys. And a lot of them can't.

Tests also tend to have limited "shelf life". Test shelf-life can be compromised by a lot of things, like changes in common term-usage, or changes in what knowledge is common vs arcane.The test used to determine how much training it would take for a federal employee to learn a second language was developed in the early 1950s. Good test, developed by one of the premier linguists of the era. It used phrase-learning of Kurdish and an unspecified central African dialect to assess how easily a person picked up a language they had no prior knowledge of. Well, that was the early 1950s. Our former next-door neighbours, who moved about 2 years ago, were originally from Irbil in northern Kurdish-controlled Iraq. The language spoken at home with their 3 kids was Kurdish. What would have been like Martian to most Canadians in 1960 is a whole lot more common today.

Similarly, I recall using a personality test for one research project I was an assistant for. The test was developed in the 1950s, and we were using it with school-children in the mid-1970s. I spent a lot of time deciphering the terms for the kids that my own generation would have implicitly understood, like "your folks" or "your chums".
 
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