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It is time. I gotta do this.

I've tried before and almost completely quit once by being strict about cutting down. I got down to just a couple per day and just had to wean myself off those last couple. I was honestly surprised at how easy it was. But I didn't fully quit, in part because I was afraid of being without my little crutch. And, after my Dad died, I started smoking with a vengeance. But I have to quit.

Does anyone have any advice? Any techniques that they used? Any info that will help? Anything at all?
 

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Quitting smoking is easy. Quitting nicotine is the hard part. Get the gum to get you through the crutch. Then start weaning yourself off the gum.
 

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I'm not sure where they're at now, but I thought they were coming up with some sort of injection to help people quit.

Some people can smoke a pack a day for a decade and quit cold turkey (I am one of those people as is everyone in my family). Apparently, there's something our DNA produces that makes it easier.

I can't fully understand why people can't quit. In my head, it's if you want to quit...you just quit. I don't know what it's like to cave in to the need.

So, my advice....check to see if they made a synthetic version of whatever it is in us people - they were supposed to ages ago, so it must be out there (unless it killed people in the trials :eek:)
 
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It is time. I gotta do this.

I've tried before and almost completely quit once by being strict about cutting down. I got down to just a couple per day and just had to wean myself off those last couple. I was honestly surprised at how easy it was. But I didn't fully quit, in part because I was afraid of being without my little crutch. And, after my Dad died, I started smoking with a vengeance. But I have to quit.

Does anyone have any advice? Any techniques that they used? Any info that will help? Anything at all?
Only a complete idiot would smoke.


I quit many years ago. I just kept thinking about cancer patients, smoker's lungs, and the tobacco company executives makings big salaries off the deaths of smokers.






 

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i quit for 10 yrs and went back due to stress. i did it cold turkey last time. i can do it again the same way, i know. but before i do, i need to set my mind to it. my mind isn't in that place right now, so i still smoke.
when i did it before i noticed something. ALL of the cravings come from the same exact place. habit. me, i like to smoke after i eat. when i fire up the car to go somewhere. or just before i need to be somewhere that i can't smoke. if you can identify those habits and work on changing them, quitting cigs will go alot easier
 

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I'm a serial quitter, I quit at least 10 times a year the past couple of years. Prior to that, I quit for 1.5 years and got myself in pretty good shape.

I can't be around smokers, I bum until they tell me to feck off, then go buy some. I'm in 2 bands with smokers, though nobody else in my family smokes.

Patches work good for day to day even week to week. But weaning off that last stage, I'll often last a day or 2.

So, I've done it and know it can be done, but right now I'm smoking. I love smoking, but hate how it makes me feel, I have a lot less energy and of course wind. And smelly.

Oh, and the pics on cig boxes, or of diseased organs, have zero effect for me. I can stare at them for hours while I puff away.
 

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Richard, he KNOWS it's not good for him. That's why he's asking for advice on how to kick it for real.

Colchar, people vary in what sorts of abstinence discomforts they experience. Obviously, the shittier one feels without a smoke, the harder it is to go without. We might like to think that those who successfully quit are somehow possessed of some greater will-power. And while I suppose that there are those in the world who can just make up their mind to walk on hot coals, or pull out an arrow embedded in their chest, in most instances, degree of will-power is moderated by the quality of experience one has to overcome. Somefolks are swimming against a stronger current than others.

All of which means that the time-frame one aims for, when "quitting", has to be calibrated to the extent of the dependency and the quality of the abstinence experience. Some folks might be able to go cold turkey, some might need a few weeks to wind down, some a few months, and some a longer period, aided and abetted by things like patches, etc.

As with any habit one wishes to eliminate and replace with something better, part of the trick is making achievement of the stage-goals (e.g., 4 less smokes today than yesterday) realistic, noticeable, and sustainable. If one can reduce consumption by 2 smokes a day, and HOLD to that, great. If it has to be 1 less than usual, for two weeks, before reducing to 2 less than usual, so be it. If a person can quit in 3 weeks,more power to them. If it takes a gradual 6-month wind down to be able to hold to it, so be it.

Part of what makes cigarette smoking such a bugger to kick is that, unlike other addictions like injectable drugs, the self-administration ritual is engaged in often dozens of times a day, and is associated with too many diverse contexts, making for a stronger association and compensatory response. Contemporary limits on where one can smoke have been helpful in forcing people to associate smoking with only a few select contexts, such that cravings are somewhat reduced outside of those contexts. Not magic, mind you, but helpful. I don't know how one would go about doing it, but it would seem that limiting yourself to smoking only in some specific situations, and enjoying those smokes, might be helpful in the winding down. F'rinstance, could a smoke be a reward oneis permitted on the porch after 6PM, or only before 10AM? That is, something that could become strongly associated with a circumstance you don't experience the rest of the day. Just an idea.

For my part, I'm not a fan of smoking, but if a habitual activity doesn't take away more in health than it delivers in pleasure, then the deal is fair. Trouble with smoking is that a sizeable share of cigarettes are smoked without even really noticing or enjoying them, such that the health-to-pleasure exchange is sorely imbalanced. I have often joked with smokers to "Smoke the ones you're going to really enjoy, and leave the rest in the package."
 
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Richard, he KNOWS it's not good for him. That's why he's asking for advice on how to kick it for real.

Colchar, people vary in what sorts of abstinence discomforts they experience. Obviously, the shittier one feels without a smoke, the harder it is to go without. We might like to think that those who successfully quit are somehow possessed of some greater will-power. And while I suppose that there are those in the world who can just make up their mind to walk on hot coals, or pull out an arrow embedded in their chest, in most instances, degree of will-power is moderated by the quality of experience one has to overcome. Somefolks are swimming against a stronger current than others.

All of which means that the time-frame one aims for, when "quitting", has to be calibrated to the extent of the dependency and the quality of the abstinence experience. Some folks might be able to go cold turkey, some might need a few weeks to wind down, some a few months, and some a longer period, aided and abetted by things like patches, etc.

As with any habit one wishes to eliminate and replace with something better, part of the trick is making achievement of the stage-goals (e.g., 4 less smokes today than yesterday) realistic, noticeable, and sustainable. If one can reduce consumption by 2 smokes a day, and HOLD to that, great. If it has to be 1 less than usual, for two weeks, before reducing to 2 less than usual, so be it. If a person can quit in 3 weeks,more power to them. If it takes a gradual 6-month wind down to be able to hold to it, so be it.

Part of what makes cigarette smoking such a bugger to kick is that, unlike other addictions like injectable drugs, the self-administration ritual is engaged in often dozens of times a day, and is associated with too many diverse contexts, making for a stronger association and compensatory response. Contemporary limits on where one can smoke have been helpful in forcing people to associate smoking with only a few select contexts, such that cravings are somewhat reduced outside of those contexts. Not magic, mind you, but helpful. I don't know how one would go about doing it, but it would seem that limiting yourself to smoking only in some specific situations, and enjoying those smokes, might be helpful in the winding down. F'rinstance, could a smoke be a reward oneis permitted on the porch after 6PM, or only before 10AM? That is, something that could become strongly associated with a circumstance you don't experience the rest of the day. Just an idea.

For my part, I'm not a fan of smoking, but if a habitual activity doesn't take away more in health than it delivers in pleasure, then the deal is fair. Trouble with smoking is that a sizeable share of cigarettes are smoked without even really noticing or enjoying them, such that the health-to-pleasure exchange is sorely imbalanced. I have often joked with smokers to "Smoke the ones you're going to really enjoy, and leave the rest in the package."
It is these images that motivated me to quit, and have kept me off them for the last 20 years. When I would crave a smoke, I could visualize the photos and that was enough to keep me off them.
 

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I've never smoked so I can't help you much, but I did drink. The only way I quit drinking successfully was cold turkey, alone. No idea if it's relevant to your situation.

But whatever, please quit.
 

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As with most things in life, you have to want to do it.

My dad was a very heavy smoker, and quit a few times with the gum, cold turkey from open heart surgery, etc, but always kept starting again with a vengeance.

He had a cancer scare and successfully quit with the patch.
 

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Well my heart felt sympathy to you for at least thinking about quitting, for me it took a life sentence to make me quit Pulmanary Fibrosis was enough to get me to they say 3-5 years on average once diagnosed on on year 3. And it wasnt easy cause everyone I knew at the time were smokers of both kinds but it was my last grandson that had me do it knowing that he was to young to remember me.
And having heard evidence that tabacco companies were intentionally screwing with amount of nicotine and even changing the filters to make sure you get the max amount of nicotine to keep you hooked and also they tell us quitting heroin would be a lot easier well its a hard road.
Not going to be easy but you must find yourself your motivation and realize that part of it is habitual and pattern based (times and excuses ) and breaking those are going to be your hardest part but knowing that you can be stubborn and antagonistic you must reverse that onto yourself and get some medical choices to go with it ie patches sprays whatever else is out there and change those habits and try to not look for reasons to go back mine was my mother dying so good luck and know you are going to go through some serious medical changes from the lack of nicotine so fight those to.
For me I am frightened by knowing one day I will wake up and not be able to expel enough CO2 to get my next breath in and choking is one bad way to go but as Muhammad Ali said don't count the days make the days count so know that it can get very serious not being able to breath and at this point you still have a chance to reverse some of that. ship
I quit the day I was diagnosed and there are still days 3 years later that I think about it but that is all I allow myself
 

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December 8, 1978 is when I quit - cold turkey. Haven’t smoked since. I found it surprisingly easy but I can’t assume it’ll be easy for you, of course. In any case, much luck to you and I hope you succeed in kicking that nasty habit. You’ll feel so much better without it. Cheers
 

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Addiction to smoking cigarettes, the habit, the nicotine, etc. various from individual to individual and can be worse than opioids for some. I was lucky, I smoked on and off from the time I was 16 to 24, usually a pack would last me 3 days. When I quit, I just quit. It was easier for me. like I said, I considered myself lucky. However I worked in social services for 30 years, many with mental health problems, and cigarette smoking was virtually impossible to any one of them to quit . Only one person I worked with was able to do it, and it took a severe episode of tachycardia (brought on by 10 coffees and a pack and a half of cigarettes in one day) that scared the absolute shit out him.

Sorry about going about how difficult it can be for some. The more support you have, the better. I would temporarily keep some distance from people who would make quitting difficult. Good luck. Nothing to lose by seeking help.
 

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It is these images that motivated me to quit, and have kept me off them for the last 20 years. When I would crave a smoke, I could visualize the photos and that was enough to keep me off them.
If it worked for you, great. I don't know that rubbing them in people's noses is an effective deterrent. If they wish to quit, and the images remind them why, that's terrific, but they are effective when they remind people WHY they are making the choice they are.

An acquaintance was, for years, the director of the Tobacco Control unit at Health Canada that came up with the pictures and put them on packages. As explained to me, they would never receive the resourcing to put up the advertising campaign required so they offloaded the advertising to the tobacco manufacturers, who had to print something on the package anyway; may as well be in the public interest. One day we were waiting at the bus stop, and I asked him: "Murray, do people actually look at those pictures?" Without so much as a moment passing, he replied "Our best estimates are an average of 1.6 times a day. When it drops down to about 1.2, we change the pictures and accompanying message." The packaging - picture and message - have to capture the attention of the smoker to have any impact. Once they habituate to the picture/message - keeping in mind that they pull the package out and open it so many times a day,often without even looking at it - the picture does nothing. It needs to be novel to capture attention.

Personally, I'm quite fortunate. A friend and I snuck into the basement of a nearby house under construction, when we were 13, to smoke an unfiltered Players Plain Export A down to a roach. It was nauseating. Pretty much made for my own "quitting" regimen. Notall are quite so lucky.
 

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I had a gf that smoked. She went on the patch and that was it. I’m no longer in contact with her, but she was off smoking for at least a couple years, if not permanently.

Now if only there were a patch for junk food.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
As with most things in life, you have to want to do it.

My dad was a very heavy smoker, and quit a few times with the gum, cold turkey from open heart surgery, etc, but always kept starting again with a vengeance.

He had a cancer scare and successfully quit with the patch.

In January 2017 my Dad died of lung and liver cancer at the age of 82. He was only in the hospital a week before he died (went in for a mild heart attack on the Friday, cancer was diagnosed three days later, he died overnight on the Friday/Saturday). When he died I figured that was it, I was done smoking. But when I walked out of the hospital after he died I was shaking and immediately grabbed a smoke to settle myself down. Since then, I have been smoking with a vengeance (definitely more than I used to smoke).

Losing my Dad is as fresh to me today as it was last January. I figure I haven't fully dealt with losing him as I have dealt with it in tiny pieces, rather than dealing with the full reality of him being gone. I have been wondering lately if my increased smoking since his death is some sort of reaction to losing him. Whatever it is, I am definitely smoking more and I want to stop, but I do not want to fail at it this time.
 
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