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Discussion Starter #1
We are heading to PEI mid September and we'd like to take in the Bay of Fundy on the way. Question is, we are not familiar with the area.

So;
Where is the best place to go and experience the Bay/tides?
What time of day is best?
How far off is it from Hwy 1 going to PEI (from Fredericton)
How far is it to the PEI bridge?
Any other tips, suggestions?

Thanks eh
 

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About 4hrs from downtown Fredericton to downtown Charlottetown in my experience. When you turn off the main highway to head out to PEI, make a point of checking out Fort Beausejour. It's no Fort Louisburg, to be sure, but it's quick, interesting, and has a great view of the bay.

Make a point of getting hold of the tidal schedule. Tide doesn't roll in at the same time every day, so "best time" shifts. Arriving at a scenic location like Hopewell Cape just in time for high tide and the inability to stroll among the rock formations is a bit of a disappointment. You CAN kayak around there at high tide, but I think you have to supply your own kayak. Make sure you have decent footwear. The sea-floor of the area has little seashells embedded in it, so slipping and falling on them can cause serious skin and/or clothing damage.

Cows Ice Cream has a large stand adjacent to the PEI side of the Confederation bridge, so you may want to coordinate the state of your stomach with the arrival on the other side of the bridge. It doesn't cost to cross the bridge TO the island, but there's a fee of $40+ to exit back to NB.

The new highway through NB skirts nearly all populated areas. You wouldn't think that anyone lived in the province by travelling along it. It also provides only a fraction of the very scenic views along the St. John river valley. So if you have the time, consider spending partof your route on the old highway, from about Woodstock to Fredericton.

Note as well that there are two points on your route that are very close to the U.S. border: Madawaska, ME (just across the bridge from Edmondston) and Houltain, ME (a mile down the road from Woodstock). Bring your passports should the mood strike you to pick up any groceries fromthe "Murican" side (like Ben & Jerry's flavours unavailable here).

The segment from Riviere-du-loup to Edmondston is also quite lovely, with a few places you have to maintain your attention to not drive off the road and down the hill. The Radio reception is poor, but there are all manner of NPR stations on the Maine side that come in clear.
 

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I agree with Mark.

For seeing the bay and the tides I would recommend starting at the North entrance of the park, stop and walk the shorter trails (at least a half day, they are amazing and rainforesty) then travel east on 114 and stop at Cape Enrage (off of 915 side road) and Hopewell on your way back to the PEI bridge. Hopewell is a bit touristy, but by far the best place to appreciate the tides. You might want to check the tide charts on their site (easier than finding the tidal chart) so you can walk down to the seafloor, when its high tide there isn't much to see

If you do that loop I would budget a full day, its a pretty long drive (about 2 hours to do the loop) but there are so many great place to stop that you'll want to spend the day. Its a rare and lovely spot.
 

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Just to echo what Mark says about the highway, it is smooth and safe and fast, but it bypasses most of the nice parts of the province, lol.
 

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Did I miss something or nobody talked about St-John's River flow inversion ?
Where do you see that ?

P.S. Edmonston or Edmunston ?
 

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Did I miss something or nobody talked about St-John's River flow inversion ?
Where do you see that ?

P.S. Edmonston or Edmunston ?
I think you must be talking about the reversing falls in Saint John. Check the tide times so you can be there at the right time. And It is Edmundston.

Instead of taking the Trans Canada the River Drive is quite scenic. Get off the Trans-Canada (#1) in Aroostook and take #130 down to Fredericton.

You might also want to check out Kings Landing just north of Fredericton and St. Andrews. It is a unique little town with some good fish restaurants and lots of opportunities to go whale watching if you wish.
 
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then travel east on 114 and stop at Cape Enrage (off of 915 side road) and Hopewell on your way back to the PEI bridge. Hopewell is a bit touristy, but by far the best place to appreciate the tides. You might want to check the tide charts on their site (easier than finding the tidal chart) so you can walk down to the seafloor, when its high tide there isn't much to see

If you do that loop I would budget a full day, its a pretty long drive (about 2 hours to do the loop) but there are so many great place to stop that you'll want to spend the day. Its a rare and lovely spot.
I second the Cape Enrage suggestion,really cool spot.
 

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We would be remiss in not mentioning Shediac and Parlee Beach ( Parlee Beach Provincial Park ) It's about a half hour from Moncton and faces the Northumberland straight. A ridiculously shallow beach that you can virtually leave a 3 year-old unattended at (though I'm exaggerating). They'll be exhausted before they get out to waist height water. The shallowness makes it very easily warmed by the sun. So, sort of an amalgam of hot tub and wading pool. Shediac seems to have a perpetual "festival du homard". Cavendish beach on PEI is also wonderful, but faces the ocean, whereas Parlee faces PEI, so it is less wild.

When we pass through the region, we always stop at Mel's Tearoom in Sackville; one of those old school diners that Stuart Maclean reveled in (and wrote about). Sackville is hipper than its size would indicate, and is home to Mount Allison University. One of a handful of "college towns" in Canada, where the principal employer is the university.

And thanks for correcting my spelling, Steadly. I've spent enough time there that I should have known better.

Finally, a drive from Riviere-du-loup to Edmundston will pass by/through St. Louis du Ha!-Ha! The name is regularly misunderstood and does not pertain to someone laughing. "Ha!-Ha!" is an indigenous term for a small portageable isthmus between several lakes. So, not St. Louis of a really good joke, but St. Louis of a local geographical feature.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good tips, folks. I will more than likely go to some/many of the suggested places. Looking fwd to it as I am looking fwd to PEI (staying in Cavendish).
 

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