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I have a Jensen P12N coming and was considering a 3/4" birch plywood cab. Not knowing what size to make the cab my plan is to take the measurements from a Traynor YGM-3. Obviously I will be measuring only the area that houses the speaker and not the whole amp. Since it's a Traynor head I figured I'd also copy Pete's closed back cab design. Does this sound like a good place to start?
 

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I have a Jensen P12N coming and was considering a 3/4" birch plywood cab. Not knowing what size to make the cab my plan is to take the measurements from a Traynor YGM-3. Obviously I will be measuring only the area that houses the speaker and not the whole amp. Since it's a Traynor head I figured I'd also copy Pete's closed back cab design. Does this sound like a good place to start?

A very good idea!:smile:

You can't really go wrong copying something that you already know will work. Also, you can't really go wrong with making a guitar cab anyway!

You see, except for a couple of really bad and odd dimension ratios most anything works for a regular guitar. It's all in the speaker.

Hifi and bass cabs are much more picky. Those notes that are lower than standard E on a lead guitar require specific ratios of dimensions and also at least a minimum size or volume enclosed by the cab. The actual wavelength of those lower notes becomes a real factor. You've got to do more research and homework if you want to learn how to build those kinds of cabs.

So a lead guitar cab is basically just a frame to hold the speakers. Naturally, the speakers become pretty well the only factor for the tone.

You do have a big difference between open back and closed, however. Open back sounds louder and washes sound over more of the stage, filling better. Closed cabs sound tighter and have directivity, allowing you to "aim" your sound better if you need to.

Ports, slots and things are ideas borrowed from those bass and hifi cabs. They are attempts to get more efficiency from smaller boxes and they do work well. They won't do much with a lead guitar cab but maybe you play some of those "slam dancer" low open tunings? Now you're playing in a lower range and taking some tips about ports or things might be a good idea.

If you do get into ports and stuff, the size and position is important. Don't just jam any size hole anywhere.

Have fun!

:food-smiley-004:
 
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