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Well, I did it! I finally started cutting holes in my blank. Neck pocket and pickup cavities are done, but I have to line up a time to use my buddy's bandsaw to cut out the body, and being the impatient boy that I am, now that I've started I think I will move onto the control and switch cavities before I get into his shop. Is it better to drill the shaft holes for the switch and pots BEFORE or AFTER routing out the cavities?
And now onto my original question: I will be shielding the control cavity, but is it overkill to try to do the pickup and switch cavities as well? The way I plan to wire it is with a pot for each pup doing the single coil to double coil blend. I was wondering if the single coil part of that equation would make it necessary to shield the pup holes...
-Mikey
 

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Hey Mikey,
I always drill the control holes before routing the cavity, as I use the holes to size up the cavity and also you can better judge the thickness remaining/depth you need to go.

I have not sheilded any of my guitars- and dont have an issue with excess noise. However, I do make sure everything is properly grounded. I am placing an order to Stewmac soon and may try some copper foil just to see if it will make a big difference on some of my single coil equipped guitars.

But I dont think its necessary to do the pickup cavities? Or maybe it is.. :) Dont knwo untill you try it I guess!

AJC
 

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Shielding

I have used with great success ............aluminum duct to shield some of my guitars. I consider it the poor mans version of the solid aluminum that Gibson uses in their control cavity and switch covers on Les Paul models. I've never tried it in pickup cavities but it would be easy to install..........just make sure nothing grounds out.
later
Ray
 

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Proper shielding can make a huge difference, but it greatly depends on the environment that you are playing in.

I use a 3M copper tape that has a conductive adhesive and I cover that with a Permacel polypropylene tape to prevent any shorting.

Shielding the pickup and switch cavities isn't a bad idea, it can just be a hassle as you'll have to ground the shield there as well. Another thing that can help is using a coaxial wire for your longer runs of cable, for instance the ones from the pickups and the ones from the switch if it is located far away like on a LP.

Another concept that I like to use is what is called a Star ground, which basically consists of bringing all of your grounds to one central location. This can make it easier to avoid ground loops and to keep track of your wiring, especially if you are installing a complicated circuit.
 

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i just shielded (copper tape) one of my basses and haven't fired it up yet as i'm waiting on the neck to be returned. if i'm correct, the only place you have to worry about the foil touching anything would be at the back of the pots, right? the pickup backs and covered wires would all be fine. am i not understanding something else here...grounding the shield in the pickup cavity? why do you need to ground the shielding? sorry....
 

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I shield everything. I believe that it makes a difference. When using copper tape I join each piece with drop of solder. If you are shielding a large universal routing such as on a some strats type bodys. You are truely wasting your time if you don't also shield the underside of pickguard. I have heard a lot of good things about using shielding paint and I plan to give it try next time I shield something.

My two cents worth.:)
 
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