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Looking for a set of vintage sounding but quieter pickups for my main Peavy Predator. I don't want to spend a ton of money. I was thinking of trying something from GFS, but there are so many choices. I kind of have it down to the truecoil series, Neovins, or (and a distant 3rd) the Redactives.

The guitar is currently sporting Fender Road Worn take offs installed by the previous owner. They have nice tone, but are a bit noisy (that may be the harness, I have not dug in to deep). I plan on swapping those to the other Predator that's a bit more of a backup.

Any thoughts or suggestions? I'm willing to spend max $200 CAD, but would be happier in the $150 range for 3. Thanks.
 

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Looking for a set of vintage sounding but quieter pickups for my main Peavy Predator. I don't want to spend a ton of money. I was thinking of trying something from GFS, but there are so many choices. I kind of have it down to the truecoil series, Neovins, or (and a distant 3rd) the Redactives.

The guitar is currently sporting Fender Road Worn take offs installed by the previous owner. They have nice tone, but are a bit noisy (that may be the harness, I have not dug in to deep). I plan on swapping those to the other Predator that's a bit more of a backup.

Any thoughts or suggestions? I'm willing to spend max $200 CAD, but would be happier in the $150 range for 3. Thanks.
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Boogieman has a point.
When shielding is incomplete (ie: gaps) it can sometimes (rarely, not always) make RF noise worse than if there was no shielding at all.
The only gaps should be where the pups come through the scratch plate.
The scratch plate itself should also be shielded.
All shielding should be grounded to the bridge (usually at the claw) and the ground side (sleeve) of the instrument jack as well as the body of at least one control pot.

Typically it is not the pups picking up RF noise but rather the wiring.
A pipe cleaner works well to paint the drilled wiring passageways with conductive paint.
A couple of coats will usually ensure the passageway shielding is complete.
Not all factory shield-paint jobs are thorough enough that this gets done.
That is particularly important if the scratch plate shielding is incomplete.
It is always wise to inspect those passageways.
Because it is typically the wiring picking up RF, many times when a person opens up the guitar to address shielding the resulting improvement has more to do with re-routed wiring after reassembly than the shielding itself.
Single coil guitars can be finicky that way.

Something to understand is that shielding is not guaranteed to eliminate 60 cycle A/C hum in a single coil guitar.
If 60 cycle hum is the primary concern you might want to check the house wiring for loose connections at switch and plug boxes as well as lighting fixtures.
If loose wiring is suspected then those should be checked anyway since loose connections at those locations can be a fire hazard.
Any dwelling built in the late 60s and early 70s that has not had the wiring upgraded could possibly have loose connections.
In those years aluminium was cheaper than copper and it was often used as the conductor metal in house wiring.
Aluminium has roughly the same electrical conductivity as copper but it is subject to a much greater degree of expansion and contraction with temperature changes.
Temperature changes occur when current draw is high and then low.
The wire warms up during high current draw and expands.
Since it cannot expand against the screws holding the connection, the aluminium will expand only lengthwise at the screw location.
When it cools though, it is free to contract naturally in all directions, including receding away from the screw-clamp.
Because of this the connections can loosen up over time.
It might be wise to open up a few boxes to see if aluminium was used.

Another thing to look for when tracking down sources of A/C hum is dimmer switches.
If there is a dimmer switch being used anywhere in the building it could easily be the source of 60 cycle hum.
Try turning that switch completely off and using an alternate lighting source.
If you are in an apartment building and the neighbours are using dimmers there's not much you can do about that.
 
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