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Hi everyone! I'm new to the site but happy to be here. I have a question about patch cords. Over the past while, I've noticed that while I'm practicing a/o playing a couple of my electric guitars with my Fender Frontman 25R practice amp, that I get a low buzz sound that stops when I either touch the bridge, tailpiece, or just push the strings down onto the pick ups? I have a decent looking patch cord, that's 25' in length and has a nice braided sheath, so it seems to be decent quality wise, but am wondering if a poor ground or something is responsible for the sound, as I suspect? I have a few decent guitars, most notably an Epiphone Casino Coupe with the P90's, and an Epi SG, along with a Glen Burton Memphis with highly upgraded pick ups, that all produce this annoying effect. If it is the patch cable, what should I be getting to eliminate the problem, and how much am I looking at spending? I'm not worried about spending a fair price for a quality cord as long as I know it'll address the problem. I look forward to any advice or help, anyone can offer! Thank you! - Ron
 

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Yes, sounds like a poor ground but I would not jump to blaming the patch cord. You can prove the point if you have a cable tester or multimeter with continuity test setting. Alternatively just try another patch cord (even a short one - like for pedals - just to prove the point). If it is the cord you could probably fix it - the issue is most likely to be a bad solder joint at one connector or the other. Otherwise just get a new cable - you do not need an expensive one, just any regular cable from e.g. L&M. Do test that this is the issue before you bother... though I guess it's not a bad idea to have a spare.

Since it's not just one guitar, I would next check the amp - 3 prong power cord? Is the third prong compromised? Have you tested the ground on the wall socket? If no multimeter or tester, try another socket in another room, though that can only prove that the one in the original room is bad not that it is good (they could both be bad).

Do you have any friends who could lend you a cable/amp to try in your house (or bring their rig over to jam)?
 
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Hi Ron...Welcome to the forum! Hope you enjoy all that it has to offer and that you will post/start new threads often.

I also have and enjoy an Epi Casino Coupe.

If all the guitars are producing the same buzz and that buzz is reduced by you touching (i.e., grounding the strings) then the cable seems like the logical choice to be causing the problem. Cables take a lot of abuse and can often become problematic.

I'm assuming you don't have another cable (even a short cable for a pedal board) to try ?
While on that topic, are you playing through any pedals or a pedal board?

Have you eliminated the unlikely fact that your amp is not causing the problem?
(i.e., using your guitars and cable through another amp)?

The plugs on the cables can often be repaired if you can do a bit of soldering.
New plugs of a better quality can be put onto your existing cable. Ironically (no pun intended) I just did that for a friend yesterday.

As far as advising you as to which cables are the best bang for the buck, I'm not sure as I typically make my own.

Personally, I like (and make) cables with Neutrik brand plugs. The braided nylon covering adds durability (and cost) and gives several cosmetic choices, but it isn't beneficial in any other way.

Cheers

Dave

EDIT: @Granny Gremlin and I posted at the same time.
I haven't read his post yet, but he has much more experience and knowledge about electronics than I ever will.
 

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Given the choice of guitars, I wouldn't be suspecting the cable.But I guess it's worth a quick check.

What the OP listed was at least 2 and maybe 3 single coil guitars - one with P90's and a Glen Burton Memphis (is that a tele?). The RF interference in some rooms is just nasty with single coils and grounding the guitar with your hand will reduce the amount of RF interference. Even humbuckers can be problematic, but not as bad (there's a reason for that name).

Buy a real guitar! One with manly humbuckers. That weighs at least 10 pounds. Probably a Les Paul. And drop it to your knees like Jimmy did.
 

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It is probably ground related, and you will probably never eliminate it 100%. As mentioned above, try different combinations to see if there is a single cause: different amp, power outlet, room in your house, out of the house. But in my experience, buying a new instrument cable has never helped.
 

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The RF interference in some rooms is just nasty with single coils and grounding the guitar with your hand will reduce the amount of RF interference.
I have one of the same guitars as the OP (Epi Casino Coupe) and touching the strings has never helped me to eliminate/reduce 60 cycle hum or any other type of interference.
 

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I get a low buzz sound that stops when I either touch the bridge, tailpiece, or just push the strings down onto the pick ups?
Another question... Did the buzzing start more or less spontaneously or has it been an ongoing, consistent issue since acquiring your present gear?
 

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you may be experiencing magneto reluctance due to capacitive duractance. try aligning the spervings into a semi0boloid array. if that eliminiates your problem, the solution is elementary. apply inverse reactive current to the unilateral phase detractors , for about 30 minutes or so. that should set things right in short order.
 

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you may be experiencing magneto reluctance due to capacitive duractance. try aligning the spervings into a semi0boloid array. if that eliminiates your problem, the solution is elementary. apply inverse reactive current to the unilateral phase detractors , for about 30 minutes or so. that should set things right in short order.
That is a $100.00 solution for a $3.00 problem.
 

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That is a $100.00 solution for a $3.00 problem.
Yeah,but it worked real good for Dr. Frankenstein when it came to fireing up one of his creations.

As for patch chords; they are the devil’s work; evil lurks within them and they have two primary reasons for existence: (1) get all wound up and scratch your guitar and (2) get all wound up and take your eye out.
 

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I have one of the same guitars as the OP (Epi Casino Coupe) and touching the strings has never helped me to eliminate/reduce 60 cycle hum or any other type of interference.
My drummer's practice room is so noisy (bad wiring and a few neon lights) that I won't even take an SC guitar to a practice (P90 or Fender). Even my humbucker guitars are noisier than they usually would be and I find myself touching the strings to keep the noise at bay.

When we play in his living room or barn, the problem isn't apparent. That one is definitely location specific (not even to do with power feed or AC panel, it's just that room).
 

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When you do buy a new chord ask about the warranty, the planet waves/ DeAddario , Ernie Ball all have life time warranty.
I have taken a few back and no receipt needed, they send my old chord back to the company and notify me when the new chord arrives.
A guitar player needs more then one chord, my spares have spares....one thing I notice is the chords with the 90 degree ends , go first...I do not buy them anymore...
 

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When you do buy a new chord ask about the warranty, the planet waves/ DeAddario , Ernie Ball all have life time warranty.
I have taken a few back and no receipt needed, they send my old chord back to the company and notify me when the new chord arrives.
A guitar player needs more then one chord, my spares have spares....one thing I notice is the chords with the 90 degree ends , go first...I do not buy them anymore...
That's a bummer. I always use at least two cables with right angle plugs. One from guitar to pedalboard and one from pedalboard to amp. That way, when the hoards of teenagers swarm the stage, they won't step on a straight plug and break it. :D

That said, I 'roll my own' with Switchcraft 228 plugs. I've never had one break or fail. Some are 40 years old now.
 
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