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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all

I have just been loving my Godin 5 and have been looking at all the others out there 4-6 string so far.

One thing I do like is the slim neck of a 4 string and think I will pick one up probably sooner than later. This brings me to my question, whats the difference between the P and J. Most sales guys tell me its just the pickups but I think its more than that.

For a Metal, Blues do all bass which is better?
What are the best $700 to $1000 4 strings out there with active electronics?

Bev
 

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If you're going to compare 2 Fenders, 1 jazz and the other a P, there are differences. The jazz neck is a bit thinner, while the P neck is a bit fatter and rounder. Most say that the jazz bass will sound more bright and growly, while the P bass has more mid range thump.
Obviously the P has one pickup, so the jazz can be a bit more versatile. I have one of each and find the P bass very versatile since with only one pickup in the middle, a slight change in hand position makes a big deal of difference.

I really like the P and would recommend it for blues, rock, metal etc...

There really are lots of basses in your price range. Not a p or a j, but for a very versatile active 4 string, check out a G&L Tribute. Ibanez, Yamaha, Washburn, Cort etc etc... all have nice active basses in that price range.
 

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+1 on the G&L tribute.., L2000 is a good choice,, has a myriad of tonal possibilities from emulating the P to growling like a J,, and everything in between. They also have a new J style out,, JB-2.. two jazz style pickups,,
both in your price range and both with the smaller neck.

Little darker sounding,, try an epiphone Les Paul, neck is bigger and it'll probably be a little heavier,, and even Yamaha makes a nice bass in your range, but I wasn't struck on the neck..
 

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nine said:
I think the P-bass is the most versatile.
I disagree that it is the most versatile as far as having a myriad of tonal possibilities (like the G&Ls), but you can pretty guarantee that a P-bass will sit in the mix well, either live or recording.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys

Do you know of a shop that has the GL's in T.O.?

The P and J I played the other day had a great feel and I did prefer the feel of the J. The J had the active PU's which were full of tones and fun to play with especialy if you have no clue what is what.
I did notice the P had a different feel to it which would be the neck as you said.

Do you think active PU's are worth it in the long run or better to stick with the passives and get a pre amp?

You guys have been a great help...Thanks!!
Bev
 

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Just my $.02, but I played active basses pretty much exclusive for the last 20 years. This past year has been strictly passive jazz and P basses and I really like the passive tone through a tube pre-amp. That being said, my new 6 string is active and it is very punchy sounding, not to mention a much hotter output. It's really personal preference, but I've been finding the last year or so that simpler is better for me.
 

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james on bass said:
I disagree that it is the most versatile as far as having a myriad of tonal possibilities (like the G&Ls), but you can pretty guarantee that a P-bass will sit in the mix well, either live or recording.
Yeah, that's what I meant. There's a reason so many people play them. Sure, you can't get a billion unique tones out of one, but really, even if you could, would you? Then again, I'm a fan of the K.I.S.S. approach to things. :banana:
 

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Oh, I didn't see your next post where you essentially said the same thing I said about keeping it simple. Maybe next time I'll read down further before I post. Haha.

Oh yeah- and mark me down as voting for passive pickups. For all of the reasons I've stated above.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looked at some pre amps and it they look very pricey so far, think I will go with the new bass.

No luck tracking down the G&L's in T.O. yet but I stopped by Steves and they have tons of Basses on the wall. The one that totaly gets me going is the Fender Jazz Geddy Lee model..That thing sounds and feels amazing!!
Not a big Fender fan but I will be for this one, price is $900 and change.

When I got home I pulled the Tab on Tom Sawyer..what a fun song to play!! Still doing it with the pick, fingers get to confused..

Since it is a production Japanese model it will be around which gives me more time to do my home work.

Bev
 

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Nothing wrong with MIJ Jazz basses! I own one and I'm very happy with it.
There is a store called Gear Music in Oakville that has G & L's. Also a store on Erin Mills parkway in Mississauga but the name escapes me.
 

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If you want to find G&L basses in Toronto try Ring Music. I haven't dealt with them, I just know they carry G&L.

You'll find bassists from all styles of music playing all kinds of basses - experiment and find what you like. There are some combinations of bass and music style that don't work as well as others, such as using a fretless with an agressive preamp for blues, but most situations will be workable. Fender Jazz and P basses cover a lot of territory and cover it well. Jazz basses are generally the most used basses in major studios, at least according to the interviews I've read with various studio bassists and that's why Roger Sadowsky started off making Jazz 'copies'. I don't think there are many gigs you couldn't swing with a P-J configuration regardless of whether it's active or passive.

Happy shoppping!
 

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Bevo said:
This brings me to my question, whats the difference between the P and J. Most sales guys tell me its just the pickups but I think its more than that.
Hi Bevo. You've had lots of good answers so far... obviously the Precision split coil versus the two single coils on the Jazz is one. This makes the basses sound quite different. In a nutshell tonally the P is about the "punch" and the J is about "growl". Another difference is the offset body on the J which balances a bit better for some folks.

As far as the neck goes there's quite a bit of variation between years. Typically the Jazz has tighter string spacing at the nut and a fretboard that is narrower (across) but the neck is deeper (through). The neck on my '62 P is almost like a ruler... wide but not very deep compared to my '78 Jazz.
 

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P or J what's the diff?

Neck and body differences aside, I have read an interview many years ago with a mid-60's record producer who said it was standard practice to use Jazzes for pop records and Precisions for soul records. Note that an obvious exception like (pop) Precision player Carol Kaye used a pick to get her "cut."

In the studio, the Precision may have a noise floor advantage because the two halves of the pickup are wired humbucking all the time, while the Jazz is wired through the two volumes, which are only humbucking when set equally. Harder Sound in Montreal sometimes resorts to an extra ground wire on Jazz Bass bridges.

Peter
 
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