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Well, maybe a bit of hyperbole, but still quite a notion-shattering movie.

Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World


I've been watching Treme (another great watch) and was confused with the Indian Chief, leader of his tribe, getting ready for Fat Tuesday. I thought, "he's black, why's he calling himself an Indian and part of a tribe". Then I watched Rumble and it all started to make sense.

What we've been told is black/African inspired music (jazz, blues) probably has more to do with Native Americans than any other single group. There was a lot of cross-polination (for lack of a better word) between American Natives and African slaves early on. And that has permeated and spread to today, including people like Hendrix (look at how he dressed for stage).

Some great (and I would think rare) musical performances and interviews, telling a thought-provoking story.

And for you conspiracy theorists in the crowd: "Yes, the government was involved in the cover-up", as per Buffy St Marie.

This opened my mind and I now see and hear things differently. That's what a good doc should do.

Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World (2017) - IMDb

 

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On some levels, I can believe it. The nasal tones of Delta blues are too booming to suggest origins from West Africa or from Scotland-Ireland (soughs). Booming nasal tones are present in Plains singing because they don't have anything to bounce off of and can't rely on modal booms to carry enough frequency information over that distance.

Jazz is defined by the connection between Cuba and Louisiana. Both native and African Cubans and their counterparts from Louisiana mixed to form the genre. Once that cord was cut with the embargoes, jazz was going to ossify. You lose half of the language and only get the blues. At the same time Cuba was being closed off, Jamaica gained independence and began its own connection with the US. You now get hiphop. The native stomp + Cameroonian rhythms in Montreal, you get disco.
 

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I enjoyed Rumble very much. And, as you say, it was a real eye-opener. The Jesse Ed Davis part is pretty sad though. Great player.
 

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I enjoyed Rumble very much. And, as you say, it was a real eye-opener. The Jesse Ed Davis part is pretty sad though. Great player.
Yes, there were a couple of guys I wasn't familiar with. I can hum some of his solos but did not know his name. I blame my isolated prairie upbringing and not the metal and booze. ;)
 
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