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I've got an e845 and like it a lot. I used it at home for band practice - it's crisper and more open than a 58.

But still take a 58 out to jams/gigs/etc because of the resistance or concern I get from some soundpeople. Weird. A mic's a mic and you're gonna tweak the strip for the guy's voice, one way or the other. I don't get the "I only like to use one type of mic" mentality.
Agree. If the 58 was functioning properly I would just continue with it, but...
 

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So my local pawn shop has an 835 for $60 and an Beta SM58A for $120. I don't really need another mic but I do only have an old Samson for when I want to mic my amp (as well as a 20 year-old Beta 58A - which I neither love nor hate, for my vocals). Which do you think would be the better value purchase? The 835 to just try something different? The Shure because it's a Shure?
 

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So my local pawn shop has an 835 for $60 and an Beta SM58A for $120. I don't really need another mic but I do only have an old Samson for when I want to mic my amp (as well as a 20 year-old Beta 58A - which I neither love nor hate, for my vocals). Which do you think would be the better value purchase? The 835 to just try something different? The Shure because it's a Shure?
Both are pretty good value at 50-60% of retail. You could buy both, try them, and re-sell the one you like least. I'm pretty sure that you could get the same price for them on re-sale. Your 20 year-old Beta 58a will sound just like the one in the pawn shop - they really haven't changed.
 

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I have a box with a bunch of 57s and 58s as well as some AKG and even some Apex.

Honestly, in my opinion if you can’t get a good sound out of a 57 or 58 it’s probably not the mic’s fault.

To my ear, they either work or they don’t, and yes, you can pound nails in with them and still have a functional mic.
 

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I have a box with a bunch of 57s and 58s as well as some AKG and even some Apex.

Honestly, in my opinion if you can’t get a good sound out of a 57 or 58 it’s probably not the mic’s fault.

To my ear, they either work or they don’t, and yes, you can pound nails in with them and still have a functional mic.
Absolutely. The SM58 is a workhorse and a perfectly serviceable mic. But if someone is shopping for an entry level vocal mic, I feel that there are better sounding mics out there for the same money.
 

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So my local pawn shop has an 835 for $60 and an Beta SM58A for $120. I don't really need another mic but I do only have an old Samson for when I want to mic my amp (as well as a 20 year-old Beta 58A - which I neither love nor hate, for my vocals). Which do you think would be the better value purchase? The 835 to just try something different? The Shure because it's a Shure?

Been signing for a long time and use a Beta SM58A now exclusively in my gigs. I`ve tried so many in the past and have narrowed it down to the Beta.

Its great to have a variety of mics but one will always be better for you. Trial and error. Mics are like guitars and basses, nice to have a selection.
 

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Absolutely. The SM58 is a workhorse and a perfectly serviceable mic. But if someone is shopping for an entry level vocal mic, I feel that there are better sounding mics out there for the same money.
I can sell you a working 58 for $75 with a cord. Good luck getting a better vocal mic for less.

I think you really can’t overstate just how brilliant a design they have and how effectively these mics have been manufactured all these years.

As a sound man I work with what I’m given (basic standards assumed). Sometimes that’s a box full of Sennheisers sometimes it’s Shures, and more often a mix.

I’m never nervous about those choices, because much like guitar playing, I know I can get a good clean sound with any of the above.

On reflection though, maybe the 58 is just what I prefer. I always seem to have to EQ the shit out of other mics until I get them sounding more or less like a 58.
 

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A 58 (or any dynamic mic) to amplify a classical guitar?... sounds like a fail to me. You’d be better of with a bottle cap pickup or entry level ust pickup... even better off with a better ust pickup. If you insist on a mic you should be in the condenser realm.
 

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A 58 (or any dynamic mic) to amplify a classical guitar?... sounds like a fail to me. You’d be better of with a bottle cap pickup or entry level ust pickup... even better off with a better ust pickup. If you insist on a mic you should be in the condenser realm.
Condensers live? No thanks.

A 57 would be my first choice.
 

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Been signing for a long time and use a Beta SM58A now exclusively in my gigs. I`ve tried so many in the past and have narrowed it down to the Beta.

Its great to have a variety of mics but one will always be better for you. Trial and error. Mics are like guitars and basses, nice to have a selection.
Well I already have a Beta 58A so maybe I'll pick up the 835 for the sake of variety and comparison.
 

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Condensers live? No thanks.
I had thought that for a long time as well until this great keyboard player joined our band and brought in a Seenheiser e865 condenser mic. I thought for sure it would be an issue, but instead his mic literally cut through all the other dynamic mics we were using, it sounded awesome.
 

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I’ve used them.

Personally when I have 20~30 strips to manage and they’re all cardiods and Di’s, that one condenser someone insists is necessary will almost always be the one to feedback.

I like them in the studio, even for rehearsals, but avoid them live.
 

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One thing I do recommend is for everyone on stage to use the same vocal mics.

Depending on how sophisticated your PA is and how many monitor mixes and associated graphs you use, having mics with dramatically different eq characteristics can cause more problems than you realize.

When you have four mics across the front ,one or two monitor mixes and the mics aren’t matched......
 

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One thing I do recommend is for everyone on stage to use the same vocal mics.

Depending on how sophisticated your PA is and how many monitor mixes and associated graphs you use, having mics with dramatically different eq characteristics can cause more problems than you realize.

When you have four mics across the front ,one or two monitor mixes and the mics aren’t matched......
I don't have a lot of experience with stage mics, but this makes a lot of sense. I've used the same idea for guitar tuning in my last band. These subtle differences in pitch make a bigger difference than many would suspect. I'd imagine the age of the Mics may be a factor too, but you can elaborate if I'm off base with that idear.
 

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I don't have a lot of experience with stage mics, but this makes a lot of sense. I've used the same idea for guitar tuning in my last band. These subtle differences in pitch make a bigger difference than many would suspect. I'd imagine the age of the Mics may be a factor too, but you can elaborate if I'm off base with that idear.
With vocal mics across the front of the stage, you have to eq the monitors to resist feedback. As mics all have different eq curves and hot frequencies, it’s just much easier to surgically reduce the offending frequencies if all of the vocal mics are matched.
 
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