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I don't normally do these things, but this one is for @greco

Picked this up in Calgary the other day, and thankfully the Westjet flight home was empty enough for me to store it in the overhead bin. It is a 1977 Greco SA-700, which is basically an ES-335 copy. And it plays and sounds soooo good. I've tried some vintage Gibson ES guitars, and this thing truly plays and sounds the part. It is in quite good shape, although the binding has lots of checking/cracks and a few chips, but this looks to be pretty normal for these guitars. Looks to be all original except for the nut. It is definitely a keeper.

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Awesome...a true genuine Lawsuit guitar. Gibson only ever sued over the open book headstock and rosette inlay. Does it have fret edge binding as well?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Awesome...a true genuine Lawsuit guitar. Gibson only ever sued over the open book headstock and rosette inlay. Does it have fret edge binding as well?
You are absolutely right. If you look at the Greco catalogs they stopped copying the headstock shape for 1979, so this one is early enough to keep the open-book headstock but late enough for Fujigen-Gakki to be at the top of their game. Perfect!

Yes, there is binding over the fret edges, along with a ton of little cracks in the binding there as well (not in the finish though, so it is super-smooth still). I presume the wood has contracted and expanded over the years but the frets did not, resulting in the tiny cracks.
 

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I don't normally do these things, but this one is for @greco
WOW!! I feel extremely honoured...Thank You very much!

Congrats on your 'new to you' Greco. It looks amazingly good considering it's age.

ENJOY!

My MIJ Greco 335 was purchased by a friend who lives only a few blocks away and I have an open invitation to go over and play it.

Cheers

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If it were mine, I'd look into rebinding.
What does something like this cost? Is there any downside to just waiting until it basically falls off? I presume it would require some refinishing. It looks kind of cool as is.
 

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I'd leave the binding as-is. It has some pretty cool character to it. If it totally disintegrates or crumbles off, then perhaps look at a fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'd leave the binding as-is. It has some pretty cool character to it. If it totally disintegrates or crumbles off, then perhaps look at a fix.
Agreed. I think I'd only replace it if it was mostly no longer there. :) Not 100% sure, but I think the finish is poly, which along with the glue might be plenty to hold it in place for years to come. Even in spots where it has chipped off, it's not down to the wood.
 

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What does something like this cost? Is there any downside to just waiting until it basically falls off? I presume it would require some refinishing. It looks kind of cool as is.
I have found the cost varies wildly. I had a guy who could do it for $75 plus materials (but he has basically gotten out of the luthier business). I've heard of guys that charge $1000.

As far as I know, binding is cosmetic. If you think it looks cool now, great. When you're ready, best to start a thread asking for references.
 
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