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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I finally got my 70's SG!!
Of course, I do have bad luck. never seem to score the really good deals.
There are always issues.

It had a headstock repair, missing pickguard. But. the worst thing is, the guy got it many years ago from a family member and it was filthy.

So what did he use to clean it?
Why, an SOS pad like everyone uses to scrub their guitars!

Man, the swirl marks are huge! I did search up and see lots of ideas, but I was just wondering if you fine folks had any ideas that you have actually used??

Its too bad, because the guitar is really clean and 100% original except the missing pickguard, strangely enough, the screws were there..
I was also a bit dissapointed as it has Tarbacks and not T-tops.
So, is there anywhere reasonable to get a 5 hole pickguard made in Canada?
Any tips on how to get rid of huge swirl marks?
Cheers
 

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'59 LP Junior & Danocaster T
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So I finally got my 70's SG!!
Of course, I do have bad luck. never seem to score the really good deals.
There are always issues.

It had a headstock repair, missing pickguard. But. the worst thing is, the guy got it many years ago from a family member and it was filthy.

So what did he use to clean it?
Why, an SOS pad like everyone uses to scrub their guitars!

Man, the swirl marks are huge! I did search up and see lots of ideas, but I was just wondering if you fine folks had any ideas that you have actually used??

Its too bad, because the guitar is really clean and 100% original except the missing pickguard, strangely enough, the screws were there..
I was also a bit dissapointed as it has Tarbacks and not T-tops.
So, is there anywhere reasonable to get a 5 hole pickguard made in Canada?
Any tips on how to get rid of huge swirl marks?
Cheers
Jim,

Congrats on the new SG. What year is it? I would try the Virtuoso polish set for the swirls. Also, I believe the SGs of the era came with tarbacks; it was the LPs that got the T Tops.

W.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks man, its a '72. I have a good Dunlop polish, and I have a really good furniture scratch removal, but they didn't help. They are some serious deep swirls. I was thinking of maybe even rubbing in some tru-oil, or wet sanding.
I actually haven't even plugged it in yet...I live in a tiny house and my daughter is a really light sleeper... I'll wait until tomorrow.
Its probably a good thing it has tarbacks as I have a '74 Custom with T-tops so it will be nice to have something different.
But..I must say, I do love these fretless wonders. I had one before, a '79 custom, with the crazy wide flat frets, and its one of the few guitars I regret letting go of.

Guitar Musical instrument String instrument Plucked string instruments String instrument
Guitar String instrument Musical instrument Plucked string instruments String instrument
Guitar Musical instrument Electric guitar Bass guitar String instrument
 

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Happy new car.... I mean guitar day ;)
 
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I think I would strip it and refinish if it was me.

That would likely impact collector value, but I don't really buy collectible guitars so that's a non-issue for me.

Not sure I've seen that sort of bridge before. Was that limited to a certain period?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't want to strip it, it is the original finish after all. I might try a touch of Tru-oil over the finish to see if it will fill in the scratches. Or, I could just live with it as it. Its plays and sounds great. I love those low wide frets.
The bridge is called a harmonica bridge and was pretty common for that era.
 

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I like the way the neck is set further into the body. I haven't tried one of those but it makes sense to me.
 

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I don't want to strip it, it is the original finish after all. I might try a touch of Tru-oil over the finish to see if it will fill in the scratches. Or, I could just live with it as it. Its plays and sounds great. I love those low wide frets.
The bridge is called a harmonica bridge and was pretty common for that era.
I believe Schaller built those bridges for Gibson. The Maurader and S-1 had them as well.
 
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