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Discussion Starter #1
i have 5 yards of seafoam green tolex from nextgen and i am planning on recovering this Quinn Derby head and cab.
I have not done this before aside from crazy glueing loose flaps and all suggestions appreciated.
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  • note where the tolex is a bit short (eg the seems).
  • carefully remove the old tolex KEEPING IT INTACT (rips /holes don't matter, just don't remove it in sections other than as originally cut). Note how the corners are mitred.
  • use old tolex as a pattern to cut out the new, but add yerself a little extra length in the places you noted before. Do not trim corners out like on the original but straight line through (trim corners to fit as you apply)
  • there are a lot of options for glue, from run of the mill contact cement to that 3M spray stuff; pick yer poison. I like something spray for general application to the tolex and then some brush on CC for touching up the seems/edges/corners.
  • get the tolex loaded with your adhesive and apply it to the cab. It can help to clamp or (temporarily) staple the edge you start on so you can keep it tight as you go. Heat gun or a blow dryer to warm up the tolex for corners and other tricky spots. Might dry out the glue (even if heat from other side) so be aware and ready to reapply to these areas as you go. If using spray you might need to reapply a burst as you go to re-tack-ify it (yes that's a word I swear). Have a utility knife ready for the corners. Cut one edge of the mitre fairly proud, just so you can round the corner letting it overlap a bit and then recut through both layers. Unround the corner, remove the offcuts, touch up adhessive and re-round the corner keeping shit toit. Don't worry if corners aren't perfect unless they're not 90 deg, because you're throwing a corner protector on top of those anyway. Take yer time on the non 90s, if any.
  • overlap the seems and then then use a straight edge and a fresh utility knife blade to cut through both layers at once for a perfect seem. Remove offcuts form both ends and clap or staple while the glue dries
  • remove the staples/clamps when dry (eg next day)
  • sometimes I leave the staples in if they are in areas that are not seen (e.g. the part going over the front/back edge to the inside of the headbox, where the amp chassis goes, or when you gotta stretch it tight through a round space like the headbox back you have)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Granny...I will follow all those rules!
searching for adhesives now...non smelly stuff is needed here in a dining/living space.
 

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I sometimes use Lepage water base contact cement , more easy to work than regular contact cement wich is too fast.

Or yellow Lepage Carpenter glue. Easy to work , but slower.
I use it as a contact ciment ; Paint glue on both surface, tolex and wood cab. Wait 45 minutes average before glue together.

Cabs with no chrome corners ; not a easy job
Best is to practice on rough home made cab
 

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It need lot of practice and more with no corner.

I do recovering on many amps. Some are on the picture ;
The two red one heads. I built cab and do recovering
Same for the small light yellow combo close to the Strat .
And the green combo at bottom right


My last job, a '63 Basman , head and cab

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I really like 3M spray adhesive. Let it dry well before joining tolex to wood.
Overlap joints, cut a single clear line through both layers, remove the offcut and lay parts next to each other.
Do not stretch.
 

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I sometimes use Lepage water base contact cement , more easy to work than regular contact cement wich is too fast.
Will that actually stick to tolex? Like the mesh/fabric back kind sure, but the regular rubber/plastic stuff? I have some and I think I tried it once but don't remember how good it was for this specifically.


This is a nice tutorial. Good luck with removing the old stuff and its adhesive though (I've never done it personally).
Usually comes off pretty easy cuz old and degraded - varies a bit with brand (used different glues), but how many vintage amps have you seen with the seems/edges coming undone all by themselves.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
yep date code checked...also have watched youtube stuff for a few days....all hyped up and suppressing the urge to rush
 

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Usually comes off pretty easy cuz old and degraded - varies a bit with brand (used different glues), but how many vintage amps have you seen with the seems/edges coming undone all by themselves.
The only removal I've attempted was on the back panel from my YGM-3. I was never going to use that so I figured it was a good piece to experiment with. When I started, it tore large shards of plywood off and so I re-glued and put it back together. I should have tried applying a bit of heat but it was looking like more of a mess/hassle than just building and covering fresh.

I can see it going more smoothly with really old crystallized adhesive. At least that could be sanded smooth with 80 grit etc. But then I remember trying to get an old set of stair runners paintable that had carpet applied previously and there was no sanding that still-tacky adhesive, and the amount of solvent needed to do the job would have been grotesque and required fresh air respirators and some sort of exhaust setup.
 

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The only removal I've attempted was on the back panel from my YGM-3. I was never going to use that so I figured it was a good piece to experiment with. When I started, it tore large shards of plywood off and so I re-glued and put it back together. I should have tried applying a bit of heat but it was looking like more of a mess/hassle than just building and covering fresh.

I can see it going more smoothly with really old crystallized adhesive. At least that could be sanded smooth with 80 grit etc. But then I remember trying to get an old set of stair runners paintable that had carpet applied previously and there was no sanding that still-tacky adhesive, and the amount of solvent needed to do the job would have been grotesque and required fresh air respirators and some sort of exhaust setup.

Weird; I have a Traynor YVM-1 that the tolex won't stay on. Back panel was usually crappier wood so maybe the glue was stronger than the thinner ply used there. I've found Garnet's tolex easy to get off. Sunn wasn't hard either. Never tried a Fender
 
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