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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1985 Ibanez RS 240 that I saved from been thrown away (relative of mine). It has a big o' crack in the body and I cheaply repaired it, to use as a learner guitar. My question is it worth me investing anymore money to restore it or is it a big investment to get it back to original.


Thanks for your input. Mike



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Hi Mike,

I personally wouldn't bother unless you're restoring it yourself. They're pretty cheap guitars and the cost of repair will be more than buying another used one if you get it finished.
 

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I'd do a quick repair myself if I were you unless you can get it done cheap. Are you planning on doing anything with the hardware or electronics?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll see if the picture tell the whole story but I agree with what was said. I might tinker with it like the electronics but not bother with the body. Then, if bored, I might sand it down and repaint it myself as a project cause I have very little money in it.




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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry for the bad pics. I'll retake them tomorrow and send again I was in a hurry.

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Discussion Starter #8
Ah, a Roadstar! You could do a lot worse, those are nice guitars.
Thanks it's definitely growing me after fixing it. I'm a noob so I guess the RED guitar got my attention. The electronics are somewhat crackling and such so they might need a good cleaning or replacing. Don't know yet which. Maybe a setup or refret cause it has a slight buzz. The first option on both is the least expensive I'm guessing.

Thanks for the input.

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Sometimes just opeing and closing the pots repeatedly will clean them up, they may need some contact cleaner.
Check youtube for tutorials, they're not that hard to rectify.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just read that on another post. I think I'll try that first. Thanks.

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Nothing needs replacement, these are great guitars. Spray cleaner/lubricant will do wonders on pots and switch. As for fret buzz, the neck might need to be adjusted, that's all.
If you're not afraid to work on the guitar, adjust the neck with this method.

If you use this method, there's no need to measure anything. That's the way a pro does it.

Begin by setting the bridge height for frets 17-21(2) so that the strings play buzz free at the lowest possible height.

Start with low E. Lower the bass side until it buzzes, raise until clear. Check A and D raise slightly if needed to get clean notes. Then do the treble side. If you bend notes up here, try a few typical bends, to make sure they don't buzz out.

When all strings play clean go to the lower frets and neck relief. Play the high E string from fret 1 to fret 16, increasing relief (loosening trussrod) to relieve buzz or decreasing relief (tightening trussrod) to lower the string height. So tighten, by fractional turns, until it buzzes and back off until it doesn't. If you bend strings , do your typical bends to insure they don't buzz out. Once satisfied, check the other strings and make small adjustments as needed.

Once you have acceptable relief, i.e. no buzz and easy action, set your intonation and you're done.

This is the opposite order of most setup directions. It is based on performance and not measurements, hence, I don't take any. It works because the neck is immobile between frets 17 and 22. The trussrod only affects lower frets. By setting the upper end first, you know any buzzes are coming from too little relief. This method works for most guitars, with truss rods.
 

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That is great guitar and also it should be great learning experience (both setting it up and playing). BGood has great instruction, just follow it and you will have wonderful instrument in your hands in no time.
And if you get stuck during some setup step - just ask around, here are so many wonderful people always ready to help.

yours truly Bojan
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to all for your help on this topic, great advice. Here are updated pics of the crack on the guitar, it's more cosmetic at this point but it could of been worse if the crack went thru the pot holes and switch hole, then we wouldn't have this conversation. Anyways, here are the pics and thanks for the feedback.




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Discussion Starter #15
It has been glued back together and is steady ? Leave it there, it's added Mojo.
Yes, I used proper wood glue and clamps, so I believe it won't break there again but eventually I guess I'll sand and repaint it. It won't look as good as it was but hey what do I expect from a salvaged axe.


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