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Yesterday in the United States government regulations that required internet companies to treat all internet traffic the same way were lifted.

Now, internet companies can slow down or speed up traffic as they see fit. It's nearly a certainty that this will produce new fee hierarchies, and probably noticeable changes in performance of some internet content.

The internet companies can now charge high-volume content producers such as Netflix, for example, extra fees for the volume and performance they need to service their customers. They can also charge ISPs more for the volume and performance they need to service their customers (users like us). Both of these scenarios would eventually cost end-users more money to use the internet.

I've seen a couple of reports this morning from other countries reporting Netflix failures - could be a coincidence. Anyone here noticing anything while they visit their favorite sites?
 

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I tried watching Netflix on my tablet last night, and received a "Cannot connect" message. Mind you, when I retried as my wife, rather than myself, I made contact. Not sure exactly what to infer from that. Ended up being too tired from the heat to watch anything, so I can't speak to the bandwidth. But it WAS the first time I have ever been told I could not connect from that device. I may try again later today and see if it still crops up. I've been interested in seeing that Ricky Gervais/"David Brent" band-tour mockumentary.
 

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It will take a while for the effects of this decision to filter down to end users but in the end it will be very bad for consumers and very good for ISPs and large content providers. They will make more money and have less competition. The Internet will become like cable TV where you will have to pay more to access premium features. Content providers like Netflix will have to pay the ISPs for the privilege of delivering content to you who are already paying the ISP to deliver the content. ISPs will be paid twice for the delivering the same content. This will stifle startups and small content providers creating a significant barrier to penetrating the market. That will benefit the large content providers who will charge you more for their content because they will have less competition. It's win/win for the big guys and lose/lose for the consumers. Most of our Internet traffic in Canada goes through the US, even if it's CBC. The Canadian ISPs do not share traffic in Canada so our traffic goes from your ISP to the US before it goes anywhere outside of their network. Because of this the US decision will eventually affect Canada as well.
 

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It will take a while for the effects of this decision to filter down to end users but in the end it will be very bad for consumers and very good for ISPs and large content providers. They will make more money and have less competition. The Internet will become like cable TV where you will have to pay more to access premium features. Content providers like Netflix will have to pay the ISPs for the privilege of delivering content to you who are already paying the ISP to deliver the content. ISPs will be paid twice for the delivering the same content. This will stifle startups and small content providers creating a significant barrier to penetrating the market. That will benefit the large content providers who will charge you more for their content because they will have less competition. It's win/win for the big guys and lose/lose for the consumers. Most of our Internet traffic in Canada goes through the US, even if it's CBC. The Canadian ISPs do not share traffic in Canada so our traffic goes from your ISP to the US before it goes anywhere outside of their network. Because of this the US decision will eventually affect Canada as well.
Kerry is on the inside loop with respect to internet matters. I wouldnot brush off lightly what he says.
 

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It will take a while for the effects of this decision to filter down to end users but in the end it will be very bad for consumers and very good for ISPs and large content providers. They will make more money and have less competition. The Internet will become like cable TV where you will have to pay more to access premium features. Content providers like Netflix will have to pay the ISPs for the privilege of delivering content to you who are already paying the ISP to deliver the content. ISPs will be paid twice for the delivering the same content. This will stifle startups and small content providers creating a significant barrier to penetrating the market. That will benefit the large content providers who will charge you more for their content because they will have less competition. It's win/win for the big guys and lose/lose for the consumers. Most of our Internet traffic in Canada goes through the US, even if it's CBC. The Canadian ISPs do not share traffic in Canada so our traffic goes from your ISP to the US before it goes anywhere outside of their network. Because of this the US decision will eventually affect Canada as well.
Yeah it's all about the big corporations getting richer while limiting your data. Facepage/Google...ect want to track you... And so it goes. Seems to all be going to shit these days. Might be time to drop internet too
 

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It will take a while for the effects of this decision to filter down to end users but in the end it will be very bad for consumers and very good for ISPs and large content providers. They will make more money and have less competition. The Internet will become like cable TV where you will have to pay more to access premium features. Content providers like Netflix will have to pay the ISPs for the privilege of delivering content to you who are already paying the ISP to deliver the content. ISPs will be paid twice for the delivering the same content. This will stifle startups and small content providers creating a significant barrier to penetrating the market. That will benefit the large content providers who will charge you more for their content because they will have less competition. It's win/win for the big guys and lose/lose for the consumers. Most of our Internet traffic in Canada goes through the US, even if it's CBC. The Canadian ISPs do not share traffic in Canada so our traffic goes from your ISP to the US before it goes anywhere outside of their network. Because of this the US decision will eventually affect Canada as well.
Not to mention the Canadian ISP's/Media Companies (same thing in our case) are drooling over the aspect of eliminating net neutrality here. Seeing this happen will just give them more ammunition.

The sad part is for people who don't know anything about the internet, they just believe the bullshit they hear from those companies about how eliminating it will be a good thing. People need to follow the general rule. If Bell or Rogers is telling you something, it's likely complete bullshit.
 

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The Internet will become like cable TV where you will have to pay more to access premium features.
And quite likely (as with cable), even though you are paying the subscription, you will have to put up with advertising.
 

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With the way Internet security is going in the world, I’m probably going to slide back into the dark ages.
I’m using it less and less, and plan on even less still

But you know what? I’m getting out more. Interacting with people, real time. Getting off my ass and spending it outdoors. Experiencing the world that we’ve all forgotten.
 
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