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Discussion Starter #1
Nikon D5300. These have been around for a couple of years. They seem to be at clearance price. Current model is the D5600. Touch screen, Bluetooth, extra stop exposure sensitivity and a longer lasting battery (15%) are the only real differences and not worth the extra $340 IMO. I've been chugging along with a 12 year old D80. I have been noticing the limitations over the last year. The technology has really advanced in that time. Faster, more sensitive, higher quality pix. Hopefully looking forward to missing and flubbing less shots. (stock photos)





 

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Nice. If I ever decide to get back into photography I'll be ditching Canon and moving to Nikon. My cousin let me shoot his D7300 last fall for a day. What a wonderful useable platform.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

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I've been wanting to get a decent camera, but have no idea where to start.

Camera geeks, feel free to impart your wisdom unto me.
iPhone 8 ;)

Seriously.
I went to Europe this summer, and didn't take out my dslr even once. I used to be a huge shutterbug, but for me, it's time has passed.

Well wishes and congrats for the OP though.
 

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I'm still using a d90. Does everything I need it to do.
 

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For your first test picture, did you have it on 'auto'? It's a stunning picture, but I've never been patient enough to learn about aperture and shutter settings. If I get a picture of that quality, it's purely by chance!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've had 36hrs with camera and so far it is 5 thumbs up. I have done more photography since spring than in the last few years. So I finally got a subscription four months for Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop (used that in the previous decade) - one of my retirement goals that I hummed and hawed about for two years (I kick myself for not doing it sooner). My Nikon D80 was doing the job, but was not quite keeping up with job recently. Imagine that for the past few years you have been driving a very well maintained old Dodge Dart with a carbureted slant 6 and it did the job. But then your driving needs became more demanding and it wasn't keeping up and you got something more modern with a 24v fuel-injected V6. Better performance and fuel economy, etc. It really does the job for you now.

The focusing system and processor speed really impressed me. I was at a rodeo in Tofield last June and missed at least a half dozen good shot (like always) because the camera was too slow or just wouldn't focus properly at all. There have been a couple of other times this year when the camera didn't respond fast enough, or not at all, and I missed some good shots. I've always been Type A/Anal-retentive about my photography, but little else in my life, except guitar setup, feel, playability (that old aging weak puny little girly man hand again). But I am still very Type B about my playing - I am well aware of my limitations (but that is another story)
 

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For your first test picture, did you have it on 'auto'? It's a stunning picture, but I've never been patient enough to learn about aperture and shutter settings. If I get a picture of that quality, it's purely by chance!
Pretend the camera is a tap for a water hose. The aperture is the knob that turns on the water. The more you open the tap, more water flows through. Shutter speed is how long you leave the tap open.

Aperture priority allows you to pick how far you "turn the knob". Wide open lets in tons of light but no depth of field. If you want high depth of field you let less light in through the lens by closing the aperture.
Shutter priority allows you to decide how sharp the photo will be. 1/8000 will stop a hummingbirds wings, or you may want to keep them blurry and pick a lower shutter speed.

So lets say for a perfect picture, auto mode takes a picture at 1/1000 of a second at f11. If I decide 1/1000 is too fast, (maybe you want some sort of blur) lets say to 1/500 of a second. Twice as much light is getting through at the same aperture, so a good picture at 1/1000 f5 is perfect, but at 1/500 will be overexposed. So changing the shutter speed one stop means you have to adjust the aperture 1 stop as well. In this case you want 1/500 at the next higher number f stop which is f16. 1/250 @f22 etc.....


f/1, f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, f/32, f/45, f/64, f/90, f/128,

Every time you close the aperture 1 step you are letting in half the light. If we use lumens, @F11 lets say 600 lumens through the aperture, but at f22 its only 300, at f32 is only 150, etc...
Same for shutter speed. Every step up or down is 1/2 the light or twice the light if you go opposite.

But the cool thing is if you are in shutter priority mode, you don't have to pick the highest shutter speed. If I am in shutter priority and I want lots of depth of field, I want a high f stop number. So turn the shutter speed as low as 1/60th of a second for a hand held picture and you will get a nice high f stop number.

Depth of field is how far and how close things will be in focus. If I take a picture with a 50mm lens at f2, anything 2 feet in front and 2 feet behind the object will be in focus. if I set it up to f22, everything within 22ft of the object will be in focus. If you want to see your depth of field there is a button you can push that will show you what the camera actually sees. Normally when you look through your camera you see everything clear, but if you push the button for depth of field you are looking through the camera with the aperture closed at whatever point you have it set at. So at f22 it will be a very dark looking picture, but you will see how much is in focus compared to say f2

Ever notice pro photographers, taking blind pictures? Ie holding the camera above their heads and pointing in the general vicinity of the object they want a picture of, say some dude in the middle of a crowd? They are using an 18mm wide angle lens set at f22. Guaranteed, the picture will be in focus at f22. Everything within about 20-25 feet will be in focus in that picuture.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I process all of my photos in one or more of three photo editing programs from the digital raw file. These raw files contain more data than a JPG file. This gives a lot more flexibility in processing the photograph. Most of my photos are taken using aperture priority, auto focus, auto exposure. I will occasionally over/under expose shots if the lighting conditions warrant it. For wider angle distance shots, I may manually set the focus sometimes.
 

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Manual focus with a stop down allows you to place the depth of field and plane of focus where you want it.
 

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300mm lens with 1.4x teleconverter (420mm) 1/100 second at f8 hand held no tripod.

Not going to do that with a smart phone
I also use exposure compensation and record a -3ev and a +3ev image as well



chipmunk.jpg
 

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Anyone interested in some Canon Gear? I have a older 20D + accessories and a sweet 70-200L 2.8 lens I don't see myself using anymore.
 

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double post
 

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I edited my explanation of shutter and aperture as there were a few mistakes... Here's a perfect example of why you I don't use auto or program. I use aperture priority 90% of the time. First picture is 1/500 f9, the second picture is 1/80 f22. Standing in almost the same spot same bird, and same focal length of 70mm. Low depth of field f9 leaves the rock out of focus as it's about 30 feet back, but at f22 it's in focus

DSC_0028.JPG DSC_0031.JPG
 

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Robert thank you for including the words along with your acronyms! I wouldn't know what you were talking about otherwise. LMAO
 

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Discussion Starter #20
@Robert1950 How is that fancy new camera for shooting video?
Have not tried that yet. Except for a couple I shot on my phone a couple years ago, I have been exclusively a still photographer. I do intend to try it, but I am a bit wary to put my foot into the water for the first time.
 
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