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"Amplifiers previously produced in Chicago, Illinois under the company Valco.
The National name goes way back to the early 1920,s when John and Rudy Dopyera started producing banjoes in southern California.Guitarist George Beauchamp approached the company with an idea on how to resolve the lack of volume in the instruments of the vaudville orchestra. His idea was taking an alluminum resonator in the guitar body to ampllify the sound. With this idea, John Dopyera and four brothers formed National in 1925.This was the birth of possibly the greatest resonator guitar company. National ran into financial hardship because of the Depression in the early 1930's. Louis Dopyera owned more than 50% of Dobro and bought out National in the early 30's. He merged the two companies together and called it National-Dobro. In 1936 the company moved to Chicago, Illinois where many companies were mass producing instruments (ie Kay, Harmony ).
Victor Smith, Al Frost and Louis changed the name of the company in 1943 to VALCO (the initials of their three first names). Valco worked on war materials during WWII, and returned to start producing instruments afterwards.
Amplifiers first appeared in the 1930's and had a striking similar appearance to the accoustic resonator instruments that they also produced. Some of these amps were known as "chicken feet". In the early 1940's National began to produce amps with their National badge as the front grille. They also had some models with elaborate designs on the grille, such as the moon and the stars.
After the war Valco began producing amplifiers under the name National. Valco also produced amplifiers for other companies including Super, Oahu, Gretsch and Airline. Most of these amps were built between the late 1940's and the 1960's and are typically mates to other companies amplifiers only with a different name. National had some models called the Dynamic, Glenwood and the Newport 50.
In 1969 or 1970 Valco went out of business. The assets were auctioned off and the rights to the National trademark were bought by the Chicago based importers Strum' n Drum. Since Valco went out of business there was no one to make amplifiers anymore and production was halted. Only the National brand survived for guitars. This company has been inporting Japanese guitars under the Norma trademark. National instruments are still being produced today, but amplifiers were never to be seen again. (Early company history courtesy Bob Brozeman, The History And Artistry Of National Resonator Instruments)" (main article on National is an exerpt from Blue Book Publications, Inc)"

"Electric Tube Amplifiers: Early Models
Since the early National amplifiers are tough to come up with information on, we have them grouped into the early and later models. The early models run from around 1930 up to the late 1950's. The later models have amps from the early 60's until the companies end in the late 1960's.
National has amps going back to the 1930's with their original acoustic resonator cover over the speaker. It is a lot tougher to find these amps the older they are. The Chicken Foot amps are a rare find. Prices can have a range from $150-500 US$. Later models include the Stagester and the Tremo-tone.Information is welcme on National amps for future editions of the Blue Book of Guitar Amplifiers. (Updated April 2006)"
"National Dobro 100
-40W, 1-12in speaker, all tube chassis, single channel, three inputs, three knobs, brown wood covering. National badge style grille, mfg 1940's"
Electric Tube Amplifiers: Later Models
Dynamic
-20W, 2-8 in. jenson speakers, all tube chassis, preamp: 2 X 6EU7, power: 2 X 6973, 5Y3GT rectifier, single channel, front chrome control panel, three inputs (1 treble, 2 regular), 2 knobs ( V, tone), black with random colored stitching covering, brown grille, mfg 1960's ( I have this one, 1962)
Glenwood
-35W, 2-12 in Jenson speakers, all tube chassis, preamp: 3 X 6EU6, 2 X 12AX7, 6973 power: 2 X 6L6, 5U4 rectifier, dual channels, front chrome control panel, four inputs (in rear, 2 per channel), eight Knobs (Ch 1 v,t,b. Ch 2: r,i,v,b,t) chrome rear control panel with tremolo speed, tone switches, black with random coloured stitching covering, brown grille, mfg 1960's.
Newport 50
-17W, 2-10 in Jenson speakers, all tube chassis, preamp: 4 X 12AX7, power: 3 X 6973, 5Y3GT rectifier, dual channels, reverb, tremolo, front chrome control panel, four inputs (2 per channel), eight knobs (Ch 1: v,tone: Ch 2:r,i,v,tone), chrome rear control panel with tremolo speed, tone switches, black with random coloured stitching covering, brown grille, mfg 1960's
Stage Star
-50W, 4-6X9 speakers, tube chassis, preamp:5879,6SJ7,6SQ7, power: 2 X 5881, 5V4 rectifier, two channels, tremelo, rear control panel, four inputs (2 inst. 1 treble, 1 mic), six knobs, brown cabinet, grille split with horizontal bar, chrome metal handle, mfg late 1950's - early 1960's.
Studio 10
-5W, 1-8 in Jenson speaker, three tube chassis, preamp: 12AX7, power:6V6GT, 5Y3GT rectifier, single channel, front chrome control panel, three inputs, one volume kmob, black with random coloured stitching covering, brown grille, mfg mid 1960's.
Valpro
-35W, 2-12 in Jenson speakers, all tube chassis, preamp: tubes unknown, dual channels, front chrome control panel, four inputs (2 per channel), 5 knobs, black with random coloured stitching covering, brown grille, mfg 1960's."
(as prev. mentioned, this is direct from Blue Book Publications, but seeing as I had to pay for this info, I am sharing)
WHEW!
that was a lot of 2 finger typing. I hope this info is useful.
cheers
RIFF WRATH
 
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