The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Voodoo Labs Pedal Power 5 died during rehearsal. I've changed out the power cord, but no love.
What's a guy to do?
Anyone know a repair guy in the Lower Mainland?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
My Voodoo Labs Pedal Power 5 died during rehearsal. I've changed out the power cord, but no love.
What's a guy to do?
Anyone know a repair guy in the Lower Mainland?
If you recently purchased the unit new, check for the warranty. I'd suggest contacting VL and they can provide you with a list of authorized repair shops.

If it's out of warranty, It might simply be cheaper buying another one.

Cheers
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,132 Posts
Not knowing all that much about the insides of it, I'll propose that there might be a few causes, that vary in their remediability

1) Well designed electrical products have a fuse...ortwo...somewhere, so that power draws likely to damage less remediable things is avoided. The fuse does not need to be accesssible on the outside. It might be on the inside.

2) Four of the outputs are spec'd at 100ma. This tends to imply they use a standard 3-pin regulator thatis also, by coincidence, spec'd at 100ma. Trying to pull more juice through them than that, however, can make them also behave like a fuse and go "poof!".

If one or two of the outputs don't work, that would suggest #2. If none of the outputs work, that suggests something more central. If it was featherweight, that would suggest a switching power supply, which could involve damage to something that only a specialized repir person would be able to address. However, the specs on the unit say it uses a toroidal transformer and weighs 1.24lbs, suggesting that it is a linear type and not switching, so that's good, because it is a simpler design and more amenable to troubleshooting and repair by even a simpleton like myself. So, unless things involve damage to the transformer itself (the least likely to have an easy replacement), theprospects for repairby someone local to you are good. The big question then becomes whether the bench-time is cheap enough to warrant repair, or costly enough to warrant outright replacement.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
2) Four of the outputs are spec'd at 100ma. This tends to imply they use a standard 3-pin regulator thatis also, by coincidence, spec'd at 100ma. Trying to pull more juice through them than that, however, can make them also behave like a fuse and go "poof!".
Higher end (and I'd think VL are) power supplies (at least) won't behave that way. The current is limited and if you overload as regards draw, your pedals will just be underpowered and behave accordingly. But if it turns out that is what happenned, buy a different model if you go the repurchase route (e.g. a Cioks; they won't blow chips like that.... because otherwise mine would be toast).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,132 Posts
Higher end (and I'd think VL are) power supplies (at least) won't behave that way. The current is limited and if you overload as regards draw, your pedals will just be underpowered and eahave accordingly. But if it turns out that is what happenned, buy a different model if you go the repurchase route (e.g. a Cioks; they won't blow chips like that.... because otherwise mine would be toast).
Let's hope 54's PSU is as good as you suggest. Fingers crossed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,970 Posts
IME, you should hope it's a linear supply. When I was in the repair business, switch mode PS's were not field serviceable and were always replaced outright. Mind you, this was 30 years ago and with expensive broadcast equipment, so I can only imagine things have gotten worse. :confused:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,132 Posts
Switching PSes ARE field serviceable, if the repair person is familiar with the supply design, and the damn thing isn't SMT. That's a whole lotta "ifs", though. And if the PSU comes from a company big enough to get proprietary parts made for them, you're pretty well tied to only THEIR parts and authorizeed repair places. Any qualified repair person, and even many unqualified ones, will be able to suss out a linear supply, and identify what needs fixing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,190 Posts
VL warranty is 5 years but you have to mail in a registry card to activate it I think.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,970 Posts
As I said, this was fairly early into SMPS's. Sony's belief was that the RLC component tolerances were very tight and any fudging would lead to failures down the road. In professional/broadcast equipment, failure was unacceptable. And the price of a replacement was probably 3 to 4 hours bench time. Completely pointless to take it apart, hand select components and take that risk to save $100 on a machine that costs $40,000.

Now if it was some rare piece of equipment or had sentimental value, perhaps the economics are different. And maybe SMPS's are easier to service now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
SMPSs have come a long way recently. They were completely unaccaptable (as regards the switching noise) in pro audio until just rather recently.

And yes, F SMD stuff in the A without lube or asking (it can be fixed; I know of people who do it, but frick what a royal PIA).
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top