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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Besides the American Special Telecaster, I picked up this 2010 Classic Player Jazzmaster Special, from the same older gentleman, who is divesting his collection of unplayed guitars. Very happy to find this one.
I always wanted a real Jazzmaster. This is my first step. I did it’s first setup yesterday.
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I think I'm seeing the reflection of the curtains instead of the wood grain... But if not, holy smokes that's very unique! Nice looking jazz you got there congrats!
 

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I'd get a staytrem, mastery or mustang bridge on that pronto ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think I'm seeing the reflection of the curtains instead of the wood grain... But if not, holy smokes that's very unique! Nice looking jazz you got there congrats!
Yes there is some reflection from the blinds. It makes a nice photo with the light enhancement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@Budda , @terminalvertigo , I have just started researching what, why, and how, about this version of Jazzmaster.

The neck profile may be representative of the 60’s era with regards to feel. There is supposed to be more angle in the neck design for string tension. The bridge chosen by Fender was supposed to be considered an upgrade that some chose over the years. I am all for nostalgia and achieving “a look”, but want guaranteed performance. I don’t think there is enough string tension/angle as is, the way that I have things lowered for the action that I like.
 

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@Budda , @terminalvertigo , I have just started researching what, why, and how, about this version of Jazzmaster.

The neck profile may be representative of the 60’s era with regards to feel. There is supposed to be more angle in the neck design for string tension. The bridge chosen by Fender was supposed to be considered an upgrade that some chose over the years. I am all for nostalgia and achieving “a look”, but want guaranteed performance. I don’t think there is enough string tension/angle as is, the way that I have things lowered for the action that I like.
Jazzmasters have a looser feel than other Fenders generally in my experience. I’d straighten the truss rod and heighten the bridge with the low E a bit higher than the high if you find it too loose.

+1 on a new bridge. I wouldn’t go mastery, that’s just because I don’t think they are worth their cost. But any set that allows for individual height is very nice.

Congrats. Jazzmasters are the most beautifully brutal sounding instruments I’ve ever owned. You are now a master.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@Always12AM , what I have found so far, is the recommendation, to find what you suggest. Basically a bridge that can set individual height that follows the shape of the neck. Then the bridge also has to be able to rock/float/slide, to move back and forth with the trem use, and set back to tuning stability.
 

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@Always12AM , what I have found so far, is the recommendation, to find what you suggest. Basically a bridge that can set individual height that follows the shape of the neck. Then the bridge also has to be able to rock/float/slide, to move back and forth with the trem use, and set back to tuning stability.
That bridge will work, generally they are all arched to the radius of the guitar from what I’ve seen. I find it helpful to raise the low E side a fraction higher than the high E none the less. I generally do this with all setups as I like low action on the smallest E and I actually prefer slightly higher action on the thumb E.

I have had an Am Pro which had big barrels and an Am Orig’ which had the old school barrels. I found both to be fine. I preferred the American Orig as I think I could control their height. The back and forth sway is a product of the steel pegs in the body I believe. Which is something to be mindful of when shopping for a new bridge.

I plan on building a hardtail version at some point in the near future. I can’t shake my love of these pickups. There is a real ES 335 / hollow sound and feel to these things that are haunting and wholesome.
 

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That bridge will work, generally they are all arched to the radius of the guitar from what I’ve seen. I find it helpful to raise the low E side a fraction higher than the high E none the less. I generally do this with all setups as I like low action on the smallest E and I actually prefer slightly higher action on the thumb E.

I have had an Am Pro which had big barrels and an Am Orig’ which had the old school barrels. I found both to be fine. I preferred the American Orig as I think I could control their height. The back and forth sway is a product of the steel pegs in the body I believe. Which is something to be mindful of when shopping for a new bridge.

I plan on building a hardtail version at some point in the near future. I can’t shake my love of these pickups. There is a real ES 335 / hollow sound and feel to these things that are haunting and wholesome.
Could you file the existing bridge pieces to get the desired string heights?
 

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Could you file the existing bridge pieces to get the desired string heights?
Potentially. If someone were to raise the bridge higher and then file down the far ends to choice that could work.

I would be reluctant to do so because it may actually just turn the bridge into a saw that blows the strings.

also, not completely sure, but if this model is anything like modern Tele and Strat models. It could have a deeper neck pocket than the original design which could be the main challenge in finding the correct break angle.

When I first got the AO60 Jazzmaster home I thought it was flawed because it seems like the neck was way above the body in terms of where it sat. I then realized that it was a 5/8 neck pocket depth like all vintage models and that everything I had ever owned was a modern neck pocket which was deeper making the neck sit lower along with the pickups and subsequent break angles.

It’s little discoveries like this and desiring that I need massive neck profiles that have ruined me financially. Because these things don’t matter to 98% of people, but double or triple the cost of every guitar for anyone who does lol.

In summary, a bridge replacement would maybe be the simplest route. Mastery bridges are very well made. But it will cost $200-400 which nobody will factor into the resale price. It’s worth looking into if you know that you are going to be a Jazzmaster for life. But in the beginning, I’d email MJT or look online for a generic.

Anyone looking for a mastery? Here, this is where I’d buy mine:Mastery M1 Offset Bridge | Axe... And You Shall Receive
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I have been experimenting with gear and finding a world of tone with the Jazzmaster that I did not expect.

I tried to verify what the guitar control pot specs are on this version. Must be 1 Meg values. The interaction just wows me. Into my Katana 100 combo and pedals not so much. However, into my little Mesa 5:25 Express Plus, in a clean channel with pedals, there are near infinite possibilities of ‘Oh My…!’ Lots more to experience and learn,
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Nice guitar!
Are those pickups P90 in disguise?
There are many misguided experts out there calling these P90’s. They are not. I have played an original early 60’s Jazzmaster for a day, back in the summer of 1974. It impressed the hell out of me back then.

They are single coils that are very flat, wide, and shallow, under the pickup cover. It has been said Leo made an original design, wide range single coil by doing this. This particular version is a slightly hotter version, that you either like, or not. I will go out on that limb, and say user error, unadventurous individuals, people who try to play with knobs stuck on 10, or extreme, eccentric perfectionist who can’t be bother to adjust the guitar control knobs new ways are the issue, if an issue is perceived to exist at all. The electronics as whole, are very, very interactive, and surprisingly quiet with the couple of amps that I have used to date. There are several more, noisier circuit amps that I have yet to try the guitar with. Using amp circuit alone for overdriven tone is very good. The real surprise is how well a variety of drive pedals interact. It is like I never properly heard these pedals before, and the range of interaction with this version of hotter pickups, tone/volume pots is incredibly addictive. Using the pedals on a very clean, Blackface sounding channel puts an enormous smile on my face, and that grin lasts for hours afterwards. There are rewards to be reaped from this hotter version of Jazzmaster pickups.

So far, I see no reason to change anything about this guitar.
 

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There are many misguided experts out there calling these P90’s. They are not. I have played an original early 60’s Jazzmaster for a day, back in the summer of 1974. It impressed the hell out of me back then.

They are single coils that are very flat, wide, and shallow, under the pickup cover. It has been said Leo made an original design, wide range single coil by doing this. This particular version is a slightly hotter version, that you either like, or not. I will go out on that limb, and say user error, unadventurous individuals, people who try to play with knobs stuck on 10, or extreme, eccentric perfectionist who can’t be bother to adjust the guitar control knobs new ways are the issue, if an issue is perceived to exist at all. The electronics as whole, are very, very interactive, and surprisingly quiet with the couple of amps that I have used to date. There are several more, noisier circuit amps that I have yet to try the guitar with. Using amp circuit alone for overdriven tone is very good. The real surprise is how well a variety of drive pedals interact. It is like I never properly heard these pedals before, and the range of interaction with this version of hotter pickups, tone/volume pots is incredibly addictive. Using the pedals on a very clean, Blackface sounding channel puts an enormous smile on my face, and that grin lasts for hours afterwards. There are rewards to be reaped from this hotter version of Jazzmaster pickups.

So far, I see no reason to change anything about this guitar.
I know the difference between Jazzmaster pickups and P90s, my question was about your specific pickups. They seem to have flathead pole pieces like P90 and not flat poles like a normal Jazzmaster pickups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I know the difference between Jazzmaster pickups and P90s, my question was about your specific pickups. They seem to have flathead pole pieces like P90 and not flat poles like a normal Jazzmaster pickups.
I have noticed the adjustable pole pieces on my pickups. I also noticed how they were adjusted by someone. The bridge pole screws on mine are set significantly higher, and all over the place, not necessarily following the strings. I did check for individual string volumes, and all seemed quite good. I have not yet felt the need to try and adjust the pole pieces yet. Maybe whoever set them knew what they were doing.

I believe the intention was to allow any possible string gauge, or wind, to be adjusted for this guitar. Original Jazzmaster guitars used heavier gauges of strings. I have not measured the gauge as what came with the guitar. The strings could be factory original. They feel like .010 gauge.

I have also seen adjusters on some Squier models. I am not fully knowledgeable yet about everything related to Jazzmaster pickups yet. I only into 6 days of ownership on a spur of the moment decision to buy a cool looking Mexican Jazzmaster. Now that I own one, I am looking at everything about the guitar, and what I read about them critically. I am working on forming an opinion about mine, and will now study other Jazzmaster versions when I get one in my hands.

So far, I am liking it more every time I pick it up. A string change will be coming soon, after a little more evaluation time.
 
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