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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cool. I don't think I'd trust my soldering skills to build an amp.

I've got a walnut combo cab for that if you are looking for one (apologies for the Spam, but I figure you are going to have to put it in something).

Pete
Sneaky I'd like to see a photo of that Walnut cab. I am interested, a price too! Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
The instructions are OK. Probably great for someone with more experience. The amp is set up as being a good project for beginners, but in my limited experience the instructions are not idiot proof. They are not step by step. It does take some thought to put it together. I was surprised a little at first, but as I dug in, and did my research to some of my questions, it's all coming together nicely right now. I like the idea of actually having to use your brain a bit and figure out how to put this kit together. It will be extremely rewarding when I can play through it. My soldering skills are not not great either, but my wife does it full time at her job, so she's coaching me. I don't want her to do any soldering, but she is giving me good tips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Circuit board completely populated and soldered now. All flying leads in place. Ready now
to drop board into chassis however 2 mounting holes were missed in when the board
was manufactured. A small delay, I'll drill them tomorrow. Coming along slowly. I triple
check everything, and sneak in about an hour a night. I am getting a little pickier with my
solder joints and touch them up so they look good.


 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Soldering and assembly of the chassis completed. I plugged it in tonight for testing and no smoke of fireworks, just a nice bright red jewel lamp. I need to pick up a new multimeter tomorrow to test the voltages before I install any tubes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Fired the amp up last night and it was quiet...No noise unless I poked around with the DMM, and I could hear some crackling form the speaker.
Thought about any areas where I was not 100% clear on understanding what I was doing. The only thig I was unsure of, and the instrucions were not thorough, was the installation of a coax, shielded wire from V2 to a volume pot. The shielding is sent to point 1 on the pot, the center of the wire is sent to point 3. The other end goes to V2. I had just cut the end of coax straight off and soldered it to the tube pin. The tube end was the problem. I had to remove the coax wire and strip back the shielding so only the center wire was touching the tube pin. It turns out the shielding was contacting the tube pin 2 also. Flip the switch and success! We have rock'n roll. The amp works fine. No idea on how it sound yet, just working with a speaker on the bench. The circuit is a little noisy or buzzy at idle. I will have to double check all my ground points I guess, re-solder some maybe. I want it quieter. I am happy it works though, and looking forward to putting it in the cab.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
glad you got it working quickly

what was your total build time?
I work full time and I have an active family. Between those things I was able have it running in 1week. The next one would go faster as I spent a fair amount of time wrapping my head around what Was going on as I assembled it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Re: Lead Dress

Thanks for the lead dress info. I may re-route and possibly re-wrap wire pairs, so they are tighter.
When I was building the amp the instructions stated to wrap the tube heater wires together and push them tight against the chassis, which I did. I saw a photo of a deluxe build where the heater wires wire out away from the chassis and the tube sockets, probably held there by the solid core wire, zip-stripped to stay out away from all the other wires. Sort of airborne above the socket board. Thanks for your help here. There are good folk in St John's. I've been there recently , and was born on the Rock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well I'm 99% done. Still want to chase a pesky little buzzing problem. Will get at it again soon. My tweed cabinet arrived today. It looks brand new, I cannot find a mark on it. I found a deal on the net from a private seller. $125 shipped from Philly to NW Washington. Heck of a find. I mounted the chassis and an original 1964 Jensen C12N in there that I took out of my 64 Bandmaster cab to store. It sounds very darn good. The volume is so touchy from 0 to about 2.5, then at 2.6 it explodes into full-on, rip your face off tube distortion. From 2.5 to 12 the amp does not seem to get any louder just dirtier. I can see this is not really a "keep your family happy at home" amp. It rips, but man, it's loud. The C12N is a ceramic speaker. I plan to order a Weber 12125-A, alnico soon and put the old C12N away again.

The buzzing is not completely gone yet. It's great when I plug my guitar into either of the bright channels. If there is no guitar plugged in, or I plug into the normal channel it's there. I'll get it sorted out soon enough. Right now, I am having too much fun playing it. I highly recommend the Trinity Deluxe kit. It has good quality components and good instructions for beginners. was my first ever amp build and I am very happy with how it turned out. - Keith












 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Cab rear cover has been flipped over.. It's all good now. The cab was a sweet deal, and looks brand new! I was told from the guy I bought it from that he bought it from
E-bay seller "drumsnguitars". That seller has one on E-bay now as I type this. $195 US funds including shipping within the USA. IF you live close to the USA border, and can sneak down to pick it up, that is a good deal.
The cabinet is of good quality and is coated in amber shellac. I recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Finally got around to recording and uploading a sound clip of this amp build. Here is the thread I posted at the Trinity site:

I built a Trinity 5E3 kit back in May. I recorded this clip today. Both guitar parts are from my Fender American Series Strat plugged straight into the 5E3 amp. I had the amp volume on 6 for the rhythm guitar part, and on 12 for the slide part. 100% pure natural tube overdrive with single coil pick-ups. Guitar volume knob was maxed.


If you are interested I double mic'd the amp with a Sure SM57 and an AKG C214 condenser mic and blended them.

SoundClick artist: Keith Barron - Home based blues rock.



 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Update

Been almost 7 months now and this amp is still "all killer, no filler". She gets a lot of use and attention. I located a reproduction Tweed Deluxe logo for the front of the amp. It is a Trinity amp, and the Trinity logo is inside the back of the amp. I wanted an original type logo to pay homage to Leo Fender who put out the original amp in 1960. I have yet to install the VRM mod for volume attenuation. I will one day when I can pry my fingers off the guitar, and shut the amp down long enough to do the install.

Pic with logo, and ES-339. I play this guitar & amp together a lot.
View attachment 553
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Milkman I loved building that 5E3, you should be pretty excited! I went on to build two more tweed amps. A 5F2A tweed princeton, followed by a 5F1 tweed champ. All are great. Yes take your time and if you are interested I recommend reading more to learn about how each component works, and how they contribute to the amps sound. What are you planning to do for a cab?

For the sake of Fender Tweed enthusiasts I did upload a few Youtube clips of my amp builds. Here they are:

Trinity Tweed 5E3:Trinity Deluxe 5E3 Demo Fender Tweed Deluxe Clone - YouTube

Tweed 5F1 Vs Tweed 5F2A: 5F1 Champ Vs 5F2A Princeton - YouTube

Good luck with your build. I look forward to hearing about on the amp building section here on this forum. - Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Hey Milkman. Sorry I don't have a photo of the underside of my board. I layed it out exactly as specified in the Trinity instructions and it worked fine. Take your time and double check everything with a digital mutimeter to ensure you have everything hooked up where you think you should. I am not 100% sure exactly how long I left each lead. There is plenty of wire there in the photo. More is way better than not enough. Wire is cheap, leave plenty and cut and trim one at a time as your go around and hook everything up. Have a look at post #12 back on page 2 of this thread. You'll see after I inserted the board into the chassis the wire leads are sticking out. Not a ton of wire there, but enough to work with. This should hopefully give you an idea. - Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I am not an expert as I too am learning a little more every time I build another amp. But I will share what I have learned and discovered by my own experience.
Ohers here with more experience are welcome to add to my comments. This 5E3 I built here had eyelet holes in the circuit board. Some other kits have different mounting. I built a 5F1 with hollow pegs, not sure what they are called. Turrets? And yes I did solder up some wires by placing the wire into the top of the turret, and soldering instead of going under the board. I don't believe it really makes much difference to how the amp sounds or functions. When I look back the photos I posted earlier in this thread, I see that when I placed the board in the chassis, I liked how the board forced the wires to make a nice even 90 degree bend. This is good and helped create nice clean lead dress. The wires are bent nicely and sort of told where to sit. If I had soldered on top of the board, the wires would freely bend all over the place, and not be held down nicely by the board. This may make a situation where lead dress is sloppy. And this would most
likely introduce circuit noise.

To my knowledge the wires under the board do not effect noise control. What does effect noise control is wires that run parallel to each other. This is generally frowned upon. Wires that cross each other should cross at 90 degree angles if possible. Also the heater wires, the wires from the indicator lamp to the tube heaters, should be twisted and neatly tucked into the corner of the chassis. Keep the other tube wires away from the heater wires. Not doing so will create circuit noise.

No worries in de-railing this thread. It is here to help others. The more info here the better. - Keith
 
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