The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,823 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Check them out here.

http://www.mesaboogie.com/Product_Info/Express/Express.htm

Introducing the NEW
Express™ Amplifiers
from Mesa Engineering
NOW ARRIVING! The Express Line to Tone!
Take the 5:25, running EL-84’s out of London straight to the studio for the ultimate big sounding, little amp. Or, catch the 5:50 running 6L6’s out of Fullerton, heading uptown to the gig. These new amplifiers are the direct line to Tone City.

Both 25 and 50- watt models feature four inspiring modes from two oppositie personalities spread across two fully independent channels. If Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde had to share one platform, this would be it.

Say you’re a traditionalist: Select Clean and Blues for your two footswitchable sounds. Or, if you’re addicted to Gain, choose Crunch and Burn. Then stand back as the well-mannered soul of Dr. Jeckyll morphs into the maniacal Mr. Hyde, hardcore beast. Most important is the classic authenticity of all these iconic tones. No matter what your stylistic destination, the Express will take you there… Fast.

Up front, that number “5” indicates the low power, single-ended magic of pure Class A. The “25” and “50” refer to the rated push-pull output. Together, these make up Duo-Class™ our patented new power circuit, the first to offer both single-ended and push-pull configurations in the same amplifier.

But even that’s not the last stop. Each channel is further equipped with its own Contour depth control for added shaping that’s both assignable and footswitchable. Used subtly, Contour adds a halo of depth and chime to gleaming clean sounds. Higher Contour settings, especially in Crunch and Burn, take you into Recto™ turf, tight, huge and menacing.

Don’t be fooled by their compact size: most players mistake the little 5:25 with its ten-inch speaker for a 1x12. You’ll be shocked when you hear this little monster! And for truly stunning performance, take the 5:50. Both 1x12 and 2x12 pull like a freight train, locomotive torque.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I wonder how these compare to a YCS-50?

The F50 was am amp I was considering for quite a while and at times I was thinking about a Lonestar special or more recently the 5:50.

I love my YCS-50 it sounds as sweet to me as the F50 did the few times I tried it out.

Mark.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,957 Posts
pssst - these have been out for a little while.

there's a wack of amps i need to try out! :(
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
pssst - these have been out for a little while.
:) That's what I thought. Bit late to the party we are here at GuitarCanada.com.

I played through a pair of combos at L&Ms in Toronto when they first got them in and my verdict is: meh, especially given their price tags. The 5:50 was absolutely lifeless. Clean was anemic. Drive was fizzy and buzzy and everything bad that comes to mind when you think of Boogie over drive. The 5:25 was a little nicer. The low watt setting over drove nicely on the green channel. They were both way more expensive than they should have been. I believe they were ~$1100 and ~$1400 respectively. But my memory isn't quite what it used to be. I just remember thinking the used market has way better amps available for the same price. Boogie should have been shooting for the sub-$800 class with these. Then they'd be a bargain first tube amp type deal.
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I hope these amps are easier to tweak than other boogies, boogies are just about the least "user-friendly" amps out there if you ask me
What is it about Boogies (or a particular Boogie) that you found harder to use than any other amplifier? At first glance the Mark IV's panel looked pretty intimidating but spend some time with it and it's not so bad. And the Rectifiers have a standard set of tone controls on them. Some of the them have 4 channels, so it's 4 tone stacks repeated, but it's all standard controls.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,957 Posts
What is it about Boogies (or a particular Boogie) that you found harder to use than any other amplifier? At first glance the Mark IV's panel looked pretty intimidating but spend some time with it and it's not so bad. And the Rectifiers have a standard set of tone controls on them. Some of the them have 4 channels, so it's 4 tone stacks repeated, but it's all standard controls.
its probably because the EQ on recto distortion channels are all active, and the way they interact with each-other is different then the way the EQ knobs on other amps interact. adjusting where the mid knob is means you have more or less sweep with the treble knob, which kind of acts as a gain knob, etc.

like i said, it's all about reading the manual. afraid of a recto's EQ section? dont even look at an ENGL SE :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
What is it about Boogies (or a particular Boogie) that you found harder to use than any other amplifier? At first glance the Mark IV's panel looked pretty intimidating but spend some time with it and it's not so bad. And the Rectifiers have a standard set of tone controls on them. Some of the them have 4 channels, so it's 4 tone stacks repeated, but it's all standard controls.
Well I mostly found the EQ on Boogies to be extremely sensitive and that's my biggest gripe I guess, but then again I'm really not a tweaking kind of guy, I'm a plug-in-and-play kind of person, so take my opinion with a grain of salt I guess:zzz:
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
its probably because the EQ on recto distortion channels are all active, and the way they interact with each-other is different then the way the EQ knobs on other amps interact. adjusting where the mid knob is means you have more or less sweep with the treble knob, which kind of acts as a gain knob, etc.
They can be touchy for sure, but they're not active. I haven't met an amp that didn't have one piece of the tone stack affect another though.
 
I

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Well I mostly found the EQ on Boogies to be extremely sensitive and that's my biggest gripe I guess, but then again I'm really not a tweaking kind of guy, I'm a plug-in-and-play kind of person, so take my opinion with a grain of salt I guess:zzz:
No sweat. I'm just trying to get a discussion going. :) Talk to people. Ya know?

I find with all amps I have the same starting point: noon on all knobs (except gain and master volume). And I go from there and tweak to fit the room or the situation. I'm not much for using amp knobs to change the sound of my guitar. That being said I didn't find the Rectoverb's knobs very sensitive. I'd heard all kinds of things about tipping a knob a hair on a Boogie changes the sounds dramatically. I found it was pretty much the same sound give or take a little of that buzz saw rectifier preamp gain. Now the Mark IV I found very touchy (and a little overwhelming at first). Half a measure on any knob was a pretty radical change in the sound.

The Express amps I tried were more towards the Rectifier level of touchy-ness. As in, they weren't really at all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,957 Posts
whenever im testing an amp for the first time, i always start with the EQ flat. if it sounds good flat, then chances are it'll sound even better with tweaking :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
5:25 fan

I bought the 5:25 last summer, and am really happy with it.

This phrase from the Mesa literature is misleading, though:
Higher Contour settings, especially in Crunch and Burn, take you into Recto™ turf, tight, huge and menacing.
This amp has great tones on the crunch & burn settings, but comparing this amp to a recto has only managed to upset recto fans who were searching for a little combo. This amp is not voiced to be a recto. Maybe with an EQ and/or an OD pedal?

On the 5W setting it excels with cleans & blues. The spring reverb is awesome. I can get nice vintage vox-ish tones out of it -- great for Brit invasion music. The bass can get a little out of control on the higher-gain settings if you don't turn it down a lot.

On the 25W setting, the crunch and burn tones excel, as the bass is a little tighter on the 25W setting. The crunch channel features the 70s-80s Marshal-ish tone, and the burn channel provides a great lead tone. Moderate gain levels on the burn channel with a bit of contour (10 - 2 o'clock) yield some fun NWOBHM tones.

I'm an amateur, so for apartment play and friendly jams, the 5:25 is the perfect choice for me. Its small size makes it easy to haul to jam sessions. I was looking at a Vox AC30, but it was too big for my apartment, and I wanted a little more versatility in the higher-gain settings. I also checked out some Traynors -- they are awesome amps, but the tone on the 5:25 sounded richer to my ears. I played some Marshalls, but I wasn't satisfied with the cleans. I also played some Peaveys but wasn't really taken by their tone. The Fenders had great cleans, but I wanted more low-volume overdrive potential without resorting to a pedal. So after much humming & hawing I broke down and bought the Mesa.

I preferred the 5:25 to the 5:50 because I liked the EL84 tube sound.

I really like the Express, but those who are looking for mini-rectos should look elsewhere, as this amp isn't voiced for "modern" metal.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top