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While it is technically feasible, and even almost easy, to make one's own plate reverb, they require about the same space as a door to yield serviceable tone. So, not ideal for a dorm-room home studio, and certainly NOT a supplement to a gigging pedal-board.
 

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While it is technically feasible, and even almost easy, to make one's own plate reverb, they require about the same space as a door to yield serviceable tone. So, not ideal for a dorm-room home studio, and certainly NOT a supplement to a gigging pedal-board.
don't be such a downer, its a cool trick and it works without being too expensive or large. certainly fine for a home recording project that gets creative beyond a basic plugin
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1:30 mark.
Yeah there've been some pretty big plate reverbs.

While it is technically feasible, and even almost easy, to make one's own plate reverb, they require about the same space as a door to yield serviceable tone. So, not ideal for a dorm-room home studio, and certainly NOT a supplement to a gigging pedal-board.
Well, the one built in the video doesn't seem to be quite that large but I get what you mean.

don't be such a downer, its a cool trick and it works without being too expensive or large. certainly fine for a home recording project that gets creative beyond a basic plugin
Yeah, I just thought it was a pretty cool video and build and it probably appeals more to the DIY oriented folks. If people want to use plugins or pedals that's fine as well. :)
 

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don't be such a downer, its a cool trick and it works without being too expensive or large. certainly fine for a home recording project that gets creative beyond a basic plugin
Oh I think it is a wonderful idea, and encourage anyone with the space and a home studio to try it out. But it's one thing to flick the toggle on your Holy Grail or similar pedal to "plate", and another to suspend a suitably large and flexible sheet of metal in a way that lets it vibrate freely.
 

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i watched a few "diy" videos where folks were building plate reverbs .... iirc the plate is actually suspended under tension in a frame .
neat idea in this video could be usable for some one looking for some lo-fi treatment, ambient sounds, or sound effects.

personally i might be inclined to create a little field kit and find some objects to "mike up" . i remember some interesting sounds resulting from throwing stones at the local water tank.....but that was a long time ago ;-)
 

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He's now done a second video where he's improved the sound of the reverb by making some modifications. Here's the video:

 

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I've always wanted to build a plate reverb into a bed frame; keeps it out of the way and you could run lines down to the studio

this guy is going to update his DIY build, I am waiting for the update:

 

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wow look at these 4 at Abbey Road:

 

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i watched a few "diy" videos where folks were building plate reverbs .... iirc the plate is actually suspended under tension in a frame .
neat idea in this video could be usable for some one looking for some lo-fi treatment, ambient sounds, or sound effects.

personally i might be inclined to create a little field kit and find some objects to "mike up" . i remember some interesting sounds resulting from throwing stones at the local water tank.....but that was a long time ago ;-)
There's tension and there's tension. The plate needs to be able to vibrate in a predictable way, so it needs to be held steady. But at the same time, the manner in which it's held can't "overdamp" vibration, diminish useful decay, or restrict where one might be able to place the sensor/s. That's part of why you can't really make a usable plate reverb smaller than a certain area.
 

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What mhammer said. I spent some time researching and tinkering. Never had the space for something to do it justice and lost all interest after aquiring an AKG BX25 in the local ads which is amaze (just wish it had the optional predelay modules; unobtainable, been using a cheap older rack unit in front if it instead).
 

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He's now done a second video where he's improved the sound of the reverb by making some modifications. Here's the video:

Kinda makes you wonder if one of those castoff cymbals you often see on Kijiji could be adapted to be a "plate", with the speaker driver mounted in the middle, where the stand would normally be mounted. After all, cymbals are ground down, and shaped, to provide extended decay.
 

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Kinda makes you wonder if one of those castoff cymbals you often see on Kijiji could be adapted to be a "plate", with the speaker driver mounted in the middle, where the stand would normally be mounted. After all, cymbals are ground down, and shaped, to provide extended decay.
Cheap cymbals sound like shit tho (e.g. the complete lack of sustain of the Zildjian Scimitar crash/ride is appalling compared to any other cymbal; Sabian B8s sound like trashcan lids and are the most ubiquitous thing you'd find cheap). Best bet is to find higher end slightly damaged castoffs and the bigger the better (24" + rides).... Hmmmn, I do have a formerly pretty decent large ride with a cracks in the edge just abandoned at my studio...

I would experiment with placement. Middle does not seem best to me to start - bit of a dead spot (the bell provides stiffness) - I'd say opposite edges for exciter (I wouldn't use a speaker, but one of those bass shaker, aka turn-your-wall-into-a-speaker transducers which have come along very nicely in the last few years and gotten nice and small/cheap vs 10 -20 years ago when I last seriously looked at this) and pickup... maybe not exactly opposite but a bit askew. The reason I say this is look how cymbals are normally played - you hit the edge. Yes, some people tap the bell occasionally, but that's for effect or a different flavour - there is a lot less sustain/bass when you hit there, so it makes a cool accent; the edge can move more freely to recreate the full broadband wave. This slow mo vid illustrates that (even though the dude is no drummer - does not know how to properly hit the cymbal; you're not supposed to follow through like that, but pull back after contact - this lets the cymbal vibrate more freely vs hitting a stop as it swings away from the stick and reaches the limit set by the mounting nut; plowing through like this also guarantees cracks, but this ain't no drummer forum so nobody else cares... except it is a good way to spot a good drummer vs a crash n basher with little control who may be good but will force everyone else to turn up all the time). Notice the wave propagating around the cymbal edge.

 

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No offense to the guy, on the contrary respect for the R&D and build, but IR files of actual EMT plates (as well as other stuff like certain famous cathedrals and or studio echo chambers) have been freely available for a decade, but cool I guess.
 

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I think he's just tickled that yet one more thing from IKEA can be transformed into music gear. I have an IKEA 5 minutes from home, but prefer to direct my counter-intuitive-musical-uses-for-commercial-products urges to Dollarama; mostly their little wooden boxes, which have been slowly but surely getting turned into a large-ish modular synth, and a couple of small battery-powered amps. I also use their little wooden deck tiles for modular pedalboards. Hopefully, this coming year, I whip up a final custom version the multi-spring reverb I've proto'd, using springs from either Home Depot or Canadian Tire.
 

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Hopefully, this coming year, I whip up a final custom version the multi-spring reverb I've proto'd, using springs from either Home Depot or Canadian Tire.
Alright dish!

I love my AKG BX25, and if you're using not actual reverb tanks but bigger/more varied industrial springs I am very interested. All the best spring reverb units are/were either multiple cascaded (usually different ) prefab tanks or a completely custom built spring array (in addition to the AKG BX series, see also The Great British Spring... also key is a good pre-spring limiter circuit, but that's another topic). I like more complex reverbs; I've learned over the years that counter-intuitively, amp reverb using a short 3 spring tank are most often more to my liking than ones using a long 2 spring.
 
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