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That graduated ruler in the second set is a handy unit, I use mine all the time.

Yes, those under string guages will work just on the board without strings.
I have some, but rarely use them. Just to check the radius in a blue moon.
I tried them for a set up, but the ruler is easier and more accurate, imo.
 

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I've got the first item, and the third item. Use them all the time. I don't have the second item, but I can see a use for them. It would be a quicker way to check than the first. I added it to my cart. :)

I would say get all three.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That graduated ruler in the second set is a handy unit, I use mine all the time.

Yes, those under string guages will work just on the board without strings.
I have some, but rarely use them. Just to check the radius in a blue moon.
I tried them for a set up, but the ruler is easier and more accurate, imo.
Thank you.

I threw both items in the cart since its Amazon and fairly affordable. I also added a straight edge and some feeler gauges although I want this rad unit, just can't justify the StewMac cost for the amount of times I'll actually be using it.

 
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Thank you.

I threw both items in the cart since its Amazon and fairly affordable. I also added a straight edge and some feeler gauges although I want this rad unit, just can't justify the StewMac cost for the amount of times I'll actually be using it.

The problem I found with cheaper rulers is inconsistent measures. I was at a Busy Bee and started comparing the different rulers and they were all out with each other.
 

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Thank you.

I threw both items in the cart since its Amazon and fairly affordable. I also added a straight edge and some feeler gauges although I want this rad unit, just can't justify the StewMac cost for the amount of times I'll actually be using it.

Is that to check the neck relief?

A feeler guage and a capo or a straight edge (what I normally use) is about all you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Is that to check the neck relief?

A feeler guage and a capo or a straight edge (what I normally use) is about all you need.
Yes it is and I do agree with you but I’ve used one of these and it’s pretty sweet, just unfortunately pricey.
 

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Most stuff fromStewmac is spendy, good quality for the most part though.

I got a bunch of stuff from there when our dollar was stronger/on par years ago.
I started with one of their kits that came with the graduated ruler, under string radius guages and a nice straight edge.
I use the ruler and straight edge all the time, those radius guages rarely.
 

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I have those under-string gauges but never use them. I always reach for my un-slotted card type, probably going on 7 years now. I just find that:

• I usually already know the fingerboard radius. If I need to know, it's usually because I'm bending frets for a re-fret and the strings are off anyways, or I need to choose a radiused sanding block, or I need to check my work.

• A set of them takes up less space. If I want to radius the strings at the bridge or nut, I use it for a quick check (from above) and dial everything in at the 17th or 1st fret, under the strings, on the actual fret, with a card type action gauge—these are nice because they always span several frets so that you always know they're level when you measure.

• they make for a great radiused scraper if you do a chip repair or inlay etc. on the fingerboard

 

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To replace my home made hardwood gauges, I bought the slotted over string cards and they've been good. I often look at the Stew-Mac or Luthier's Mercantile stuff and end up making my own. That said, the good store bought stuff can be very good, I'm just cheap.
 

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I have both the graduated ruler (string action gauge) and under-string gauges (to check radius) from Stewmac. For me the string action gauge is a must, because I like all my guitars (electric that is) to have a similar setup and action. Measurements are really clear and easy to read on the 64th" scale, and I find the 32nd" really useful for setting up the height of pickups & pole pieces.

Also, I use the under-string gauges when setting up my guitars with individual saddles adjustment screws to get the proper string height relative to the fingerboard. I prefer the under-string version because I find it easier to spot strings that don't follow the fretboard radius.
 

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@vadsy Is this stuff for your own setups or are you getting into the "Vadsy's World of Fun Stuff" business? If it's the latter when can I drop off a guitar for some fret work? :)
 

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@vadsy Is this stuff for your own setups or are you getting into the "Vadsy's World of Fun Stuff" business? If it's the latter when can I drop off a guitar for some fret work? :)
Just for myself and the minor stuff, I take my junk to someone else to spruce up.

I mess with string gauges a fair bit so the necks need to be adjusted for proper relief once in a while, not to mention seasonal temps make things act out. I also swap pickups often and since most of my bridges save individual saddles they need attention, I'd like to dial things in with confidence. I also want to know what some of my neck specs are, buying some guitars used and putting partscasters together I have no idea what radius, compound or not, the fretboard is at.

Couple of guys in the city, including one forum member, do good work if you want some names/numbers.
 
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