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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, this is my first post on here but I'm hoping you could help me out with a decision! I've been playing a BT1 Baby Taylor since 2015 and I used to really love it, but I feel like the action has shifted or something's gone out of whack... it just hurts my hands so, so much. I have pretty small hands but they're not weak, and it definitely didn't used to hurt this much. I can't play a barre chord anymore on it!

Of course I know I could bring it into a shop and have it looked at, but I was already thinking about potentially upgrading in the future anyway... Overall I've never been 100% happy with the guitar. I'd say I was like 60% happy with the sound, but I figured it was the only guitar available in that size range.

I am admiring the Eastman EP10 most of all.. I was just wondering if anyone had any suggestions for guitars in the same size range? Or do we think taking the Baby Taylor to get repaired is my best bet?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Take it to a shop for a neck reset. I'm pretty sure the neck bolts in so it probably needs a new shim
 

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Take it to a shop for a neck reset. I'm pretty sure the neck bolts in so it probably needs a new shim
Correct. I had one and used a shim to re-angle the neck. Bolts are on the top, fretboard.
 
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I would get it looked at and get a quote.
After 7 years, you’ve been more than diligent in holding off on buying a new instrument.

If the repair cost is going to approach even 25% of what you could sell it for used, I would personally choose to sell instead and then look at upgrading. And then think about what the next upgrade from that would be and take a double jump. Because quite frankly, you deserve it.

And that is why I am a bad influence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would get it looked at and get a quote.
After 7 years, you’ve been more than diligent in holding off on buying a new instrument.

If the repair cost is going to approach even 25% of what you could sell it for used, I would personally choose to sell instead and then look at upgrading. And then think about what the next upgrade from that would be and take a double jump. Because quite frankly, you deserve it.

And that is why I am a bad influence.
Ha!
I am also a bad influence, and I also think I deserve something great. That's why I'm looking at the Eastman! I just find it hard to navigate once you get into the top end acoustics.

I think I will take the Baby in and get a quote, though, as others suggested. Maybe it'll be a simple, cheap fix.
 

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Ha!
I am also a bad influence, and I also think I deserve something great. That's why I'm looking at the Eastman! I just find it hard to navigate once you get into the top end acoustics.

I think I will take the Baby in and get a quote, though, as others suggested. Maybe it'll be a simple, cheap fix.
Either way, a clean bill of health is a plus even if you were to sell the Taylor.

I have very little knowledge of Eastman guitars or else I would offer some suggestions.
 

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I can't count the number of times I've had to "reset" a Taylor neck- easily 100 times over the past 10 years or so. I can count on one hand the number of Martins in the same time period- Gibsons even less.
Taylors are very serviceable though. Takes about half an hour to reset a Taylor neck if you have calipers to measure the shim. You just reduce the thickness of the shim towards the bottom bolt.
I can't decide if this is a good or flawed neck joint design.
 
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