The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody. I am looking for a 1/4 size guitar ( or am I, what would you suggest? ) for a 4 year old. He has expressed an interest on more than one occasion, so I figure what the heck, it's worth a shot. The budget would be under $200.00 and the closer to the hundred dollar mark the better! Used is pretty much out of the question, very small town, small second hand market. I have seen something called a Lucida on Amazon and a company called guitar works offer a 1/4 size nylon with proper set up.

Any advice / thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Oh to have been playing since age 4...

Thanks all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,549 Posts
You are probably looking for a ukulele. Small guitars exist, but they are usually pretty crappy. A baritone ukulele has the same tuning on the four highest strings as a guitar (DGBE) and you can replace the octave D string with a regular D string to get a more guitar-like experience. The smaller ukes would be fine too, different tuning (GCEA - your guitar capoed at the fifth fret), but the chord shapes will translate to the guitar.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,549 Posts
Guitalele - Overview

tunes the same as the guitar caoped on 5, but i agree on the uke GCEA suggestion. the chord shapes are easy to form and the sounds are pleasing.
Those Yamaha guitaleles are a great idea but every one I've ever tried has had horrible intonation. Try before you buy!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
692 Posts
Those Yamaha guitaleles are a great idea but every one I've ever tried has had horrible intonation. Try before you buy!
good to know thanks. i played one that a student had, but just basic chords. that one seemed ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
You are probably looking for a ukulele. Small guitars exist, but they are usually pretty crappy. A baritone ukulele has the same tuning on the four highest strings as a guitar (DGBE) and you can replace the octave D string with a regular D string to get a more guitar-like experience. The smaller ukes would be fine too, different tuning (GCEA - your guitar capoed at the fifth fret), but the chord shapes will translate to the guitar.
Yeah ukes did cross my mind. Thanks for the advice on the baritone ukes. I'm gonna do some research. Any suggestions as to brand?
Guitalele - Overview

tunes the same as the guitar caoped on 5, but i agree on the uke GCEA suggestion. the chord shapes are easy to form and the sounds are pleasing.
Those guitaleles are cool, my dad picked one up a while back. Could very well be one in my future regardless.

Those Yamaha guitaleles are a great idea but every one I've ever tried has had horrible intonation. Try before you buy!
Good advice, thanks.

Thanks guys.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,155 Posts
Ukulele is the way to go. Don't spend more than $40 bucks. Intonation doesn't matter, all they do at 4 years old is beat on them. I'm sure the odd child has some ability to do more at that age but with my kids, all they could do (and had interest in doing) at 4, was pluck strings & strum like nuts (not fingering a chord). The desire or ability to finger a note or play a chord came much later.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,636 Posts
I have a tiny Hofner that I used to get my son started. I already sold my Anjo. Now that he's 9, he favours his mini strat and occasionally plays his LPJ. His small ibanez just sits there (corksniffer, I guess).

The hofner is a great guitar. If you were local, I'd sell it to you with a microcube within your budget.


hofner and Anjo.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a tiny Hofner that I used to get my son started. I already sold my Anjo. Now that he's 9, he favours his mini strat and occasionally plays his LPJ. His small ibanez just sits there (corksniffer, I guess).

The hofner is a great guitar. If you were local, I'd sell it to you with a microcube within your budget.


View attachment 74761

And if I were closer I'd take you up on that. If the child carries on I'll look into mini electrics. They look like tons of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,585 Posts
You could get any inexpensive acoustic and put a capo on it.
But his child is only four years old. Maybe a small parlour but for a four year old, that would likely be too large.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,585 Posts
A parlour would be a good size. I have one and let my nephew play it a bit when he was 4.
Maybe your idea was a good one then. I thought it might have been too big but obviously not. The other thing that might be good about the parlour, is he can grow into it by moving the capo back up the fret board as he grows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,704 Posts
Maybe your idea was a good one then. I thought it might have been too big but obviously not. The other thing that might be good about the parlour, is he can grow into it by moving the capo back up the fret board as he grows.
I don't personally like the idea of using a full size guitar with a capo, but a lot of people recommend that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,549 Posts
I don't personally like the idea of using a full size guitar with a capo, but a lot of people recommend that.
More common with classical where you don't typically play full chords right away. If your kid is content with just playing melody or three string chords (and most are at that age), then a capoed guitar can work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
epiphone makes little les paul minis, my son had one years ago and thought he was a star, good luck and I will await his first song j
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the great ideas folks. I've narrowed it down to a half size Yamaha and a uke, possibly a baritone. Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,585 Posts
Thanks for all the great ideas folks. I've narrowed it down to a half size Yamaha and a uke, possibly a baritone. Thoughts?
I think that is a very good choice. You can always use a uke.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top