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I just went thru open heart surgery these past few weeks,when I got home,(going to sound cliche')I looked at all the gear I accumulated since my divorce.How many projects do I need to do and how many guitars do I need,same with amps.I don't play live anymore,time to cut down the junk I get,just because its a good price or rare.Once I'm back to 100 % going to purge of what I don't need.
 

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Actual open-heart or simple bypass? I don't mean to diminish it, having been through a triple myself some years back. But people throw the term "open heart surgery" around inaccurately. A friend of mine from another forum did have "open heart surgery" back in August or so, because his aorta went kaplooey, and he was minutes away from dying. He ended up getting a new valve installed, within a day of being airlifted to Montreal, that he tells me his daughter can hear working.

Of course, if one has a stapled chest, and has to live in abject fear of sneezing, farting, coughing, hiccuping, laughing too hard, having to push a turd out a little too hard, or anything else that brings your diaphragm into the equation, lest your sausage-casings pop out, you don't really care whether the surgery was IN your heart, or simply around your heart. It's still gonna hurt for a month and a half. And in both instances, the chief surgeon is going to make the executive call as to when to switch you from your own circulatory system to a heart-lung machine and then back again.

But yeah, getting wheeled into the O.R. at the Heart Institute, and wondering whether you will ever get to wake up again, as they put you down for the count, DOES have a way of realigning your priorities.

I have two humorous stories from my own surgery to relay. As you probably experienced, they tend to shave you "like a Vegas showgirl" before surgery, because, even though the main act is upstairs, they prep you for emergency access via major arteries down below. When I woke in post-op, with tubes and cables going in and out of me everywhere like some lame-ass pedalboard, I saw my beloved wife. My wife smiles, leans over the bed, and asks "Can I get you anything? Is there something I can do for you?" I motioned to her to come closer. She leaned in, over my face, expecting to hear something poignant. I said in a weak voice "Can you please scratch my balls. I am SOOOO itchy, and I can't reach them, or ask the nurses to do it for me." Apparently my voice wasn't weak enough to escape the hearing of the nurses nearby, who collapsed with laughter. My wife, adorable devoted woman that she is, reached under the sheet, with a look that I can only liken to the look on Bugs Bunny's face when he massages Elmer Fudd's scalp in the "Rabbit of Seville" cartoon, and got down to business.


The other funny story occurred about 6 weeks post-op. As you may have found out, or probably will, when they staple you back shut the nerves they cut to be able to get inside don't always "know" where to grow back to (assuming they are intact enough TO grow). And there can be some weird sensations as the big chest wound repairs itself and the nerves try to figure out what bar the rest of the band is presently on. I still actually have a spot on the scar-line, about an inch long, where if I touch it, I don't feel it there, but feel it in my pectorals, close to my armpits. Anyways, I'm driving along, and I start to feel a prickly sensation on my chest. Wasn't the first time, so I figured it was just more of the same. A few minutes later, the pins-and-needles sensations got more intense. In my head, I'm thinking, "If this is the price of being alive, it's still a great deal." I keep driving. The prickly sensation grows worse until I finally have to stop the car, get out and stretch to "reset" my body. And when I do, I find out that the poppy I had been wearing on my shirt breast pocket had fallen off and slipped inside my shirt. The "pins and needles" was an actual pin, jabbing me repeatedly.

Heal well and fast, my friend. Life and greatness awaits.
 

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Good luck and good planning.

I sold off a bunch of stuff just prior to cancer surgery five years ago. It needed to be gone. Slowly since then, in spite of a full recovery (so far) I've been reducing and streamlining my gear. It's safe to say I don't miss anything enough to replace it, but I do want/need a few different things. In the end I'll still have less.

We mark time by life changing events, health, disasters, deaths, employment and unemployment, and so on. They kind of reboot our brains, often times for the better, and hopefully for the wiser.

Here's to a full recovery.
 

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It was a triple bypass,chest cut open like a turkey on thanksgiving,a blood vessel taken from my left arm.
Sounds delightful (not).

I'm not a person who visits doctors often, most people would say, not often enough.

I had a scare a couple of years ago, symptoms that could have easily meant prostate cancer.

I opted for the horrific biopsy procedure. It was that or be a guinea pig with a cocktail of nasty drugs for a year and measure the results.

The biopsy was freaking scary, but it gave me a clear answer.

Cancer free.

I guess my point is, I don't envy you having had this surgery, but I admire you for going through it.

Get well, keep guitars in your life if you can.
 

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It was a triple bypass,chest cut open like a turkey on thanksgiving,a blood vessel taken from my left arm.
Nothing from your leg? I have scars down my left thigh from where they "harvested".
I found one of the toughest parts to be when those bastards make you get up and walk a few days post-op. There aren't enough cuss-words for what that feels like. Mind you, the first time I was able to walk from our home to the nearest Timmies, I felt like fricking Neil Armstrong.

Worst of all, Netflix didn't exist back then! :eek:
 

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i'm going to advise putting off the gear purge for a year, post-op. this is why:

when i got sick and almost died, it scared me, but i didn't know i was scared. i was so busy trying to get my life back on track, i didn't have time to notice that i made some pretty big decisions based entirely on fear. i only began to see this long after the fact. my son picked up on it, and mentioned it to me, but i dismissed it. the analogy is terrible, but it's kinda like that forest for the trees thing. you can't really see it while you're going through it. however, it happens to everyone, whether they admit it or not. it will definitely change your perspective on some things. some of those things will stay changed. some of them will not. either way, i advise waiting at least a year post-op before making any big decisions if you can avoid it. the mental recovery is far more subtle, esoteric, and takes longer than the rest of your body.
 

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i'm going to advise putting off the gear purge for a year, post-op. this is why:

when i got sick and almost died, it scared me, but i didn't know i was scared. i was so busy trying to get my life back on track, i didn't have time to notice that i made some pretty big decisions based entirely on fear. i only began to see this long after the fact. my son picked up on it, and mentioned it to me, but i dismissed it. the analogy is terrible, but it's kinda like that forest for the trees thing. you can't really see it while you're going through it. however, it happens to everyone, whether they admit it or not. it will definitely change your perspective on some things. some of those things will stay changed. some of them will not. either way, i advise waiting at least a year post-op before making any big decisions if you can avoid it. the mental recovery is far more subtle, esoteric, and takes longer than the rest of your body.
An excellent point there Cheezy. I experienced some of that a number of years ago just with my busted shoulder that needed fixing. I forgot about it until I read your post.

And on your recovery, Wayne, I hope it goes smoothly. Just take it easy and don't overdo it as the doctor has no doubt advised you. Had a friend go through it a couple of years ago and you wouldn't even know he had it done except for the scars.
 
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