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Discussion Starter #1
I recently put together a Leslie using organ parts and a Leslie box from a friend. On the slow speed it sometimes just stops turning so I have to get down and give it a little push in the circular direction to get it turning again. I s the belt just dirty or is it something else?
 

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What I've found on those is that sometimes they need to be taken apart and the motor re-greased, the pulley-slot cleaned up with alcohol or acetone, and the belt dressed with either a proper belt dressing or a rubbed down with a bar of soap to help it grip.
 

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I recently put together a Leslie using organ parts and a Leslie box from a friend. On the slow speed it sometimes just stops turning so I have to get down and give it a little push in the circular direction to get it turning again. I s the belt just dirty or is it something else?
Electric motors need to exert more energy to get started than to simply turn. That's why troubles like yours happen with slow speeds.

Is this a standard two speed Leslie setup or did you use an electronic speed control for the slower speed? With the electronic control you would simply set the slow speed to the slowest rate that will still start ok.

With the standard setup you could have the belt too tight, making it too hard for the motor to start up. You want the belt to be tight enough not to fall off but not too much more than that.

You might also need some "3 in 1 Motor Oil". You can get a small can from most any hardware store. WD40 might not be a good choice for motors. Anyway, with the 3n1 you put a small drop or two on the motor bearings to make the rotor spin as easily as possible. There is a bearing at the bottom of the motor and at the top holding the shaft. Use only a drop or two at each place. You don't want gobs of oil soaking up dust and maybe shorting things out. You want the least amount of friction for the motor to overcome to get going.

Good luck!

:food-smiley-004:
 

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Ok, if it is a 2 speed Leslie there is an adjustment screw between the fast motor and the slow motor. Many times, the motors are out of alignment which causes the slow motor to run poorly or not at all. This screw moves the armature of the slow motor closer or farther away from the clutch wheel. The clutch wheel is the flat round wheel with the rubber O ring around the edge. More often than not with Leslies, it's a combination of factors that cause problems. As earlier stated by WildBill, the armatures probably need oil. However be careful what kind of oil you use. The best is the type used in Hammond organs and is available through a various places such as the Organ Service Centre, Goff etc.
You can always use sewing machine oil as it's light enough and won't break down. If you have any further questions, please email me at www.toneonwheels.com
 

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Ok, if it is a 2 speed Leslie there is an adjustment screw between the fast motor and the slow motor. Many times, the motors are out of alignment which causes the slow motor to run poorly or not at all. This screw moves the armature of the slow motor closer or farther away from the clutch wheel. The clutch wheel is the flat round wheel with the rubber O ring around the edge. More often than not with Leslies, it's a combination of factors that cause problems. As earlier stated by WildBill, the armatures probably need oil. However be careful what kind of oil you use. The best is the type used in Hammond organs and is available through a various places such as the Organ Service Centre, Goff etc.
You can always use sewing machine oil as it's light enough and won't break down. If you have any further questions, please email me at www.toneonwheels.com
I was hoping we'd get a voice of experience chiming in!

+1!!

This "amp tech" forum is starting to build a great pool of talent to share techie knowledge and help!

:smilie_flagge17:
 

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sproul07 If you have the time, any chance of you posting some pics of the inside of a Leslie...for those of us who have never seen how a Leslie works

Much appreciated, Thanks

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I finally got it working properly. Nonreverb thanks for the tip about the alignment. I really cannot get over how good this thing sounds. I leave it on all the time on the slow speed and blend the signal with my Marshall JCM 800. Its perfect for any kind of music, just to give the notes that nice swirling texture. I'll post some pics of it soon.
 

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I finally got it working properly. Nonreverb thanks for the tip about the alignment. I really cannot get over how good this thing sounds. I leave it on all the time on the slow speed and blend the signal with my Marshall JCM 800. Its perfect for any kind of music, just to give the notes that nice swirling texture. I'll post some pics of it soon.
No problem...If you're ever looking for parts or further information, let me know...I'm sure I can help you out:food-smiley-004:
 

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As I said on the chorus pedal thread.....there's nothing like the sound of moving air. Try moving it around the room. It'll sound different in the corner or in the middle of a wall. Mine is diagonally across a corner. The space in the triangle behind it is filled with a bass trap.
True Paul! And if you can find one, try a Leslie with both the horn and the bass baffle. That way you can experience both the amplitude modulation of the bass rotor and the frequency modulation (doppler effect) of the horn:smile:
 
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