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Looking for a les paul jr double cut kit in Canada. I've looked at the precision guitar kits and they seem like a good way to go. I just don't like the fact he's a canadian company that's all in u.s. dollars. I totally understand why he does it tho. Anyone know of another place to get a well made kit???
 

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Looking for a les paul jr double cut kit in Canada. I've looked at the precision guitar kits and they seem like a good way to go. I just don't like the fact he's a canadian company that's all in u.s. dollars. I totally understand why he does it tho. Anyone know of another place to get a well made kit???
I just completed a LP DC from PGK and it’s my favourite guitar now. I’ve sold two of my American made guitars since I’ve completed the PGK DC and I’m doing a LP axcess style righ now from PGK.
 

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I have JR DC in Honduran Mahogany from PGK being made as we speak. I've heard nothing but good things about them. I could not find any other Canadian company that made a junior or a double cut junior in a kit.
 

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i have a Lindy Fralin over wound bridge dog ear
 

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I hope so. We'll see in a few months. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Picked up a double cut junior kit from precision. Went for a custom kit. Thanks for the replies
 

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I went custom as well, just to get the genuine mahogany. I have all the bits and pieces for my build except the kit. Lol
 

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The body of a DC Jr is extremely easy to make. It’s no different than a Tele body really - in fact I’d say it’s quite a bit easier than a Tele because there are no through holes or ferrules on the Jr.

The neck is quite simple too, as far as set-necks go. Once you figure out how to do an angled headstock (recommend using a scarf joint), along with the angle on the heel there’s really not much to it....
 

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No offence, but that's like me saying a CNC machine is a piece of cake to program. There isn;t much to it. All you need to know is all the g codes.


I'll admit, I'm pretty sure I could make any guitar body shape fairly easy, but routing for pickup, and bridge layout etc, is not an entry level position, and making a neck requires at least a few special tools that the average person does not have in the shop.
 

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The body of a DC Jr is extremely easy to make. It’s no different than a Tele body really - in fact I’d say it’s quite a bit easier than a Tele because there are no through holes or ferrules on the Jr.

The neck is quite simple too, as far as set-necks go. Once you figure out how to do an angled headstock (recommend using a scarf joint), along with the angle on the heel there’s really not much to it....
My word of caution going this route is setting the wraptail stud anchors location accurately and having the strings line up over the fingerboard and poles properly. I’d argue that this is harder to do Than through holes.
And, if your doing a DC jr without a wraptail, than I have nothing nice to say.
 

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... (recommend using a scarf joint)...
Maybe it's just a bad experience I had, but scarf joints can GTFO. I am continually amazed how many custom and boutique guitars use scarf joined headstocks now; that's fine on a $400 guitar, but if I'm paying that much or getting something custom made, I want it done right.
 

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Maybe it's just a bad experience I had, but scarf joints can GTFO. I am continually amazed how many custom and boutique guitars use scarf joined headstocks now; that's fine on a $400 guitar, but if I'm paying that much or getting something custom made, I want it done right.
Not sure what GTFO means - I’m not about to engage in an argument over this, you clearly have your opinion. But a proper scarf joint is far stronger than a cut headstock angle. It’s a simple matter of grain direction. The majority of problems with Gibson headstock breaks would be solved with a scarf joint.
 

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Not sure what GTFO means - I’m not about to engage in an argument over this, you clearly have your opinion. But a proper scarf joint is far stronger than a cut headstock angle. It’s a simple matter of grain direction. The majority of problems with Gibson headstock breaks would be solved with a scarf joint.
Didn't mean to argue or insult, just saying. GTFO means get the f out. Not directed at you so much as cheap scarf joints I've seen.

I think it may also depend on where the join is specifically. I have had to repair a few for friends. These were name brand (mid-level) instruments. Luckily, since they all broke on the join (which I have never ever seen before), it was a nice clean line and easy to glue up. One of them happened when the guitar was at rest on a stand (nothing but string pull, and I suppose, past traumas, but it wasn't banged up or noffin).

I would also wonder if there is any tonal impact, especially if the join is higher up the neck vs lower (dunno that there would be - but nothing resonates in your hand like a 1 pc 60s Gibson neck, but yes, breakage is a risk). I've seen it anywhere from across the E tuners (3x3) to the 5th fret if not higher, which is probably pretty damn strong (vs the other extreme which is not) but I'd worry about tonal tradeoffs.
 

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PGK changed the neck pocket to make it easier to machine and assemble. The mortise and tenon joint is normally angled in the body, but they put the neck angle in the actual neck at 2.5* and the headstock angle at 11* with no mention of a scarf joint. So if you look at the cavity in the body it is square and parallel to the guitar body. Normally it would be sloped. And from all the videos I have seen the mortise and tenon is an exact fit.
This pic is from one of their LP kits You can see the heel looks a little weird compared to normal.
 
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View attachment 224622 PGK changed the neck pocket to make it easier to machine and assemble. The mortise and tenon joint is normally angled in the body, but they put the neck angle in the actual neck at 2.5* and the headstock angle at 11* with no mention of a scarf joint. So if you look at the cavity in the body it is square and parallel to the guitar body. Normally it would be sloped. And from all the videos I have seen the mortise and tenon is an exact fit.
This pic is from one of their LP kits You can see the heel looks a little weird compared to normal.
I know when I installed the neck on my DC from Precision it didn’t just fall into place, there is zero play, exact match
 
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