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Any tips or tricks? I don't read music, so I can't just take that along to an audition, and anyways I like to have some muscle memory for what I'm going to play, cause I'm a hack.

-I go through the list and knock off the easy ones first. If I can pound quarter/eighth notes on a simple progression, get that out of the way after I get it down and a couple of play throughs
-on paper chord progressions or even little riffs I don't know that well, with big Sharpie writing that I can have at my feet or on my cab. Yeah, an iPad would be better, but I'm not looking for a long term crutch, just enough to get me through an audition, or maybe even a gig if shortly after the audition.

But repetition is big for me, especially with songs I don't know that well and maybe have stops or sharp turns I'm not that familiar with. That's where I am right now, have a BIG audition Friday with a ton of material where I don't know several songs at all, but I want the gig as it's music I like (BONUS in any band).
 

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Stuff I’m learning goes on a CD sometimes numerous versions of the same song and I listen to it in my truck to and from work every day and then some.

My thoughts on the audition thing. Would it be better to ace some of them rather than half ass all of them. So you come off being a good player but need some time to get all of them down which ain’t unreasonable.

Repetition and muscle memory are big for me too. Hadn’t played mandolin for over a year and completely forgot what little I knew started messing with it again last week and my hands started to remember the songs more than I did
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Stuff I’m learning goes on a CD sometimes numerous versions of the same song and I listen to it in my truck to and from work every day and then some.

My thoughts on the audition thing. Would it be better to ace some of them rather than half ass all of them. So you come off being a good player but need some time to get all of them down which ain’t unreasonable.

Repetition and muscle memory are big for me too. Hadn’t played mandolin for over a year and completely forgot what little I knew started messing with it again last week and my hands started to remember the songs more than I did
Yeah thing is I know a lot of the older stuff they do, Zep/Hip etc, and know those cold, but want to show them I am into and learning the newer heavier stuff I don’t know. So I will go in with a few half assed ‘eh, I can play along but won’t nail it’, and hope it won’t hurt their opinion, when we play the other 7-8 and I’m good.
 

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I’ve had to learn a band’s repertoire within two weeks and walk on stage before.

I developed a process of refining them by doing a rough first pass through the list and gradually getting the list to the final
Passes and then making the list smaller and smaller.

It can be done.
 

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Oh, this March I auditioned with about 10 days notice and played 3 sets very sloppily in a bar Friday after auditioning Mon. That was generally simpler songs, straight ahead pub rock with a couple of exceptions. And I had done about 15 at the audition and didn’t get a rehearsal. I was much better Saturday night lol. So, I can give a good audition, I just wondered how others went about it :)

I like to make my list bigger and bigger, the ones I can nail or verrry close.
 
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I have a friend who is a real pro, knows everything about theory etc. He recently did a new show, had to learn 40 songs, and did so with 2 short rehearsals. Other than being a musical genius and having a crazy good memory, he says you have to chart out the structure. It doesn't have to be Royal Conservatory charts, just a complete map to the entire song that you can easily follow.
 

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I posted some stuff about Chordify recently that went over like a lead balloon but it instantly gives you the chords that you can play along with the you tube video. You can be playing the song in a few minutes. Not the leads though, just the chords. You can try it free for 2 weeks which among other things, gives you the option of slowing the song down, transposing the song and adding a capo. I did sign up during the Black Friday deal for $1.99/mo payable yearly. You can also select guitar/ukulele and piano chords. Saves me a lot of time on the basic fundamentals of the song.

Blackberry Smoke - You Got Lucky (Live from Southern Ground) Chords - Chordify
 

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Just writing down the song structure, chord progressions, etc. has value. The simple act of putting pencil to paper does wonders for my ability to remember things.
This.

The more parts of your brain you have working on it, the better and faster you will learn it, with better retention. Write it, listen to it, read it, sing it (or say it) while looking at it, look away doing the same, play it...wash and repeat. The holy trinity of learning, auditory (what you sound like and what the recording sounds like), visual (what it looks like on paper and how your hands appear) and tactile (how it feels under the fingers and in your heart), must be combined to be satisfied.
 

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Any tips or tricks? I don't read music, so I can't just take that along to an audition, and anyways I like to have some muscle memory for what I'm going to play, cause I'm a hack.

-I go through the list and knock off the easy ones first. If I can pound quarter/eighth notes on a simple progression, get that out of the way after I get it down and a couple of play throughs
-on paper chord progressions or even little riffs I don't know that well, with big Sharpie writing that I can have at my feet or on my cab. Yeah, an iPad would be better, but I'm not looking for a long term crutch, just enough to get me through an audition, or maybe even a gig if shortly after the audition.

But repetition is big for me, especially with songs I don't know that well and maybe have stops or sharp turns I'm not that familiar with. That's where I am right now, have a BIG audition Friday with a ton of material where I don't know several songs at all, but I want the gig as it's music I like (BONUS in any band).
I usually grab a YouTube video or two from either Justin Guitar or Marty. They are usually simplified versions of the tunes that sound fine with a band. Finding lead lessons is harder. Ultimate Guitar Tabs is best for that.
 

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Actually I remember an entire band rehearsing for two weeks and then right out on the road six nights a week.

I did have two weeks before the guys arrived to learn my parts.

The four of us had never met but had all heard of each other. We were introduced by a mutual agent.

What shocked all of us was how well prepared the other guys were. It was an exciting two weeks of rehearsals.

This was the group.

I was bloody priveledged to be a part of it. Two guys from La Belle Province, one guy from the big Nickel and me.

29343E15-7DA3-42ED-990B-8D56358B1236.jpeg
 

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The following is from a conversation I had with a good friend who's quite talented and accomplished as a player in a number of bands including a Neil Young/CSNY tribute and a Pink Floyd tribute. I asked him a similar question to the OP. Some good tips here, hope it helps...

"Well 1st thing I do is chart each song out on its own paper, intro, verse 1, pre-chorus, chorus, however the song is constructed... that way you become familiar with each song in their musical form... after every song is charted then I wait till the next day to start practicing them, and just go through each song once or twice and move onto the next song until you get through them all... remember, digesting the songs is just as important as practicing them... also, make a play list of all the tunes so when you're driving around you can 'hear' the songs and not be distracted by what your fingers are trying to do... and truth is I would practice the set list at least once a night until the day I play them with the band
I always put the key of the song at the top of the chart beside the title... and every time you practice be sure to add notes to remind yourself of the parts that are hard or that details you don't wanna forget... be as descriptive as possible because you never know when you're gonna have a brain fart, haha
Honestly, learning a lot of tunes is exhausting but the more I learn over time it seems the more easier it gets because there's always similarities from other songs... so i'll put notes like "strum this rhythm like (insert a different song here)"
One last thing, I don't always trust chord charts on the Internet either... so it's a good to use the Internet as a starting point but make sure you listen to the song to confirm... I always trust my ear before the chord chart of someone on the internet"
 

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More on this subject from Pete Thorn. Side man for Chris Cornell and Melissa Etheridge among others.

 
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I usually write down the progressions as described above. Honestly, as long as I've heard the song once or twice and I have the chord charts, I'm fine. A couple of years ago, I attended a friend's wedding and the band let me jam with them. I ended up playing by just watching what chords they are playing. I played a whole set with them.
 

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Didn't you watch the video that was posted?

How to Practise
by Jimmy Bruno: "Repetition for fucksake, jeez! Do it 'til you know it!!"

Lol. What a guy. I sent it to all the band members and they were offended.
 
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