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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Quite some time ago I started getting lots of fret buzz on my epiphone LP standard and it wasn't just the kind that doesn't get through the amp. On some frets, the notes would die as I bent the string and some frets were just dead. I noticed the problem was getting worse and took it to Barry Ewart in Vancouver. I just want to give everyone a heads up that if something needs to be done to your guitar he's an absolutely great tech. I've read good things about him elsewhere too and my guitar teacher recommended him to me.

Anyway, he told me I needed a fret dress but I also asked him to change the nut to a bone nut and the pots for better ones. I had already changed the pickups some time ago. When I got the gutiar back I could definitely hear a difference acoustically and when played through an amp. What impressed me the most was that the fret buzz was completely gone.

This guy also makes custom guitars too so if any of you plan on getting that axe you've been dreaming up actually built, I'd imagine he'd do a fine job on that too.

:rockon:
 

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Yeah, my Epiphone is in need of some fret dressing. I get those dead sounding notes and a bit of buzz. Heck, the whole G-string sounds dead to me. I've gotta look into getting that done, but I'm not sure I want to invest more money into this guitar.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IMO it depends on how long you intend on keeping that guitar. For example I had an amp for about 2 years and I bought it for $420 tax included. I sold it for $300. So I paid $120 for an amp for 2 years which to me seems like a good deal. I'd suggest thinking about how much you paid for the guitar, and other upgrades and how much you think you can sell it for if it comes to that. Have you done anything else to it? How's it play and sound? Are you happy with it in general?
 

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If a guitar feels good and has a pleasing sound and feel, but a couple of tuning/intonation/mechanical issues get in the way, it's usually worth sending in to a tech. A tech can't make a bad guitar a good one, but if the guitar is already decent, the tech can only make it better.
 
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