The Canadian Guitar Forum banner
81 - 100 of 154 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,230 Posts
Nope, still adjectives.
Then are they modifying unseen "implied nouns", allowing them to retain adjectival functioning and conform to proper use?
I would imagine that this is how such expressions and usage evolves over time. That is, the modifier gets retained, and the object/noun gets dropped, such that the modifier comes to function like a noun. One of my neighbours is a linguistics prof who apparently specializes in syntax. I'll have to ask her.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,753 Posts
I’m not sure this is apples to apples… the email was from my bosses boss. And not just to me. It was to a few of us Front Line managers. I’d almost expect a “Hip-Hop Forum” to encourage slang. The source should dictate the feel of the correspondence. I guess I’m the crazy one expecting someone that many rungs above me to craft a professional email.
I call it the trickle-down effect.
The slang starts in the streets, schools, wherever. social media/MSM gets wind of it, next thing you know 65 yr old women on The View are saying it, followed by every other white middle class (or higher) person bc its fun/makes them seem more hip/younger etc. And it gets to a point when noone realizes where the words they use even come from (bling, dope, lit, on fleek etc) or how stupid they sound saying it. the one that comes to mind for me is "sick"....like "that Ferrari is so sicckkkkkk!". It makes zero sense. But I guess in the 70's ppl started saying "bad" in the same reverse way.
Makes me wonder if 30 yrs from now, people will look at the way, for example, those of us on this forum speak/write as being as formal as the "mid-atlantic" accent is today.
And maybe OTOH, thats just the way language is...it perpetually evolves....it just feels this time more like a regression since it isnt just new words, but sloppy misspellings/abbreviations of them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SWLABR

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,138 Posts
I’ll give you the “boss’s vs bosses” one. Not sure where I failed by capitalizing Front Line (as that’s my title) or Hip-Hop, again… title “proper name” of the genre.

It wasn't clear that 'Front Line' was a title. It came across as a description, which wouldn't be capitalized.

As for hip-hop do we capitalize rock, country, blues, etc.? Those names have become common nouns and as such are not capitalized.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,618 Posts
Nope, still adjectives.

They have become nouns in the compound form with the word 'the" in front of them. What you are forgetting is the implied "those that are," which is shortened to '"the." Yes the word "young" etc is still an adjective, but the phrase as a whole is a noun, de facto, by usage. English is not unique in having a mechanism for turning just about any adjective into a noun. This is further evidenced by being able to make such adjectives-cum-nouns plural ("the young" is already plural, the singular being "the youth, " but that's a weird one, as is often the case with English vs most other languages; you can also pluralise "The Dominican" to 'The Dominicans") - there is no such thing as a plural adjective (there are some very specific exceptions to this, but none of the words in question apply - when a noun is used as an adjective e.g. the drinks cabinet - and it is more common in British English and nearly non-existant in American English, but neither are consistent on this - see "tooth paste" - bloody English, eh).

So following that to "The Dominican" this would be correct when speaking about a person (or other object, in the grammatical sense) from the Dominican Republic (or any other place/institution so named such as the Dominican Order in Catholicism) vs the country itself (or the order itself). Except colloquially, which I'm sure happens all the time, and people will still understand contextually, but is not technically correct.

The only officially recognised abbreviations of Dominican Republic are DR and DO. Contextually you could also say "The Republic," but not the other way around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,138 Posts
They have become nouns in the compound form with the word 'the" in front of them. What you are forgetting is the implied "those that are," which is shortened to '"the." Yes the word "young" etc is still an adjective, but the phrase as a whole is a noun, de facto, by usage. English is not unique in having a mechanism for turning just about any adjective into a noun. This is further evidenced by being able to make such adjectives-cum-nouns plural ("the young" is already plural, the singular being "the youth, " but that's a weird one, as is often the case with English vs most other languages; you can also pluralise "The Dominican" to 'The Dominicans") - there is no such thing as a plural adjective (there are some very specific exceptions to this, but none of the words in question apply - when a noun is used as an adjective e.g. the drinks cabinet - and it is more common in British English and nearly non-existant in American English, but neither are consistent on this - see "tooth paste" - bloody English, eh).

So following that to "The Dominican" this would be correct when speaking about a person (or other object, in the grammatical sense) from the Dominican Republic (or any other place/institution so named such as the Dominican Order in Catholicism) vs the country itself (or the order itself). Except colloquially, which I'm sure happens all the time, and people will still understand contextually, but is not technically correct.

The only officially recognised abbreviations of Dominican Republic are DR and DO. Contextually you could also say "The Republic," but not the other way around.
I wasn’t forgetting anything implied, I was just too busy and too lazy to write out a more in depth reply. I thought about it, but then said fuck it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,483 Posts
Lol, there is a CTV new story about Walmart pulling a toy off the o line store because it's swears and talks about doing cocaine. I can't remember the exact wording but I swear it made it sound like the toy was doing lines on the Walmart website... So I told them about it and now it doesn't mention doing the cocaine online. Lol. I'll see if I can find the before and after
 
  • Haha
Reactions: laristotle

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,394 Posts
It wasn't clear that 'Front Line' was a title. It came across as a description, which wouldn't be capitalized.

As for hip-hop do we capitalize rock, country, blues, etc.? Those names have become common nouns and as such are not capitalized.
I capitalize the genres. Pretty sure I write Rock ‘n Roll, Classical, Country. But, now you got me think’n. Maybe I don’t.

Wurdz is hard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,230 Posts
I call it the trickle-down effect.
The slang starts in the streets, schools, wherever. social media/MSM gets wind of it, next thing you know 65 yr old women on The View are saying it, followed by every other white middle class (or higher) person bc its fun/makes them seem more hip/younger etc. And it gets to a point when noone realizes where the words they use even come from (bling, dope, lit, on fleek etc) or how stupid they sound saying it. the one that comes to mind for me is "sick"....like "that Ferrari is so sicckkkkkk!". It makes zero sense. But I guess in the 70's ppl started saying "bad" in the same reverse way.
Makes me wonder if 30 yrs from now, people will look at the way, for example, those of us on this forum speak/write as being as formal as the "mid-atlantic" accent is today.
And maybe OTOH, thats just the way language is...it perpetually evolves....it just feels this time more like a regression since it isnt just new words, but sloppy misspellings/abbreviations of them.
Slang goes back a loooooooonnnnngggg way. Shakespeare is full of it. Do you folks know what a "nunnery" is, or what a "fishmonger" is? Willie the Shake knew who his audience was and played to the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,138 Posts
Slang goes back a loooooooonnnnngggg way. Shakespeare is full of it. Do you folks know what a "nunnery" is, or what a "fishmonger" is? Willie the Shake knew who his audience was and played to the house.

There is no consensus on whether Shakespeare was using fishmonger as a euphemism in Hamlet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,753 Posts
Slang goes back a loooooooonnnnngggg way. Shakespeare is full of it. Do you folks know what a "nunnery" is, or what a "fishmonger" is? Willie the Shake knew who his audience was and played to the house.
Nunnery is pretty self explanatory….a convent for nuns. Alas, poor Ophelia…I knew her, Horatio. ;)….oh well, that didn’t exactly work.
much like my Brit coworkers would refer to cookery classes (what we called home economics when I was in school).
I never really thought of them as slang, just synonyms.

but ya, I’m sure there’s been slang throughout times. It may have been just as bad in the Wild West as now. Although I suspect lack of education often has something to do with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
Literacy rate is the highest it’s ever been. As with all things the boomers on this site like to scream the sky is falling and things will never be as good as they were. They are wrong. A few anecdotal news tickers and dumb social media posts are not evidence of jack shit. And to be clear I’m not talking about OP I get what he is saying in a professional setting.

Same with violence, we live in the safest time in the history of the world yet the old timers would have you believe that BLM is coming for us all and it’s just not like it used to be. Right, it’s better actually.

Forehead Nose Eyebrow Blue Microphone
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,230 Posts
Nunnery is pretty self explanatory….a convent for nuns. Alas, poor Ophelia…I knew her, Horatio. ;)….oh well, that didn’t exactly work.
much like my Brit coworkers would refer to cookery classes (what we called home economics when I was in school).
I never really thought of them as slang, just synonyms.

but ya, I’m sure there’s been slang throughout times. It may have been just as bad in the Wild West as now. Although I suspect lack of education often has something to do with it.
"Nunnery" was vernacular for a brothel at the time. And a "fishmonger" was slang for a pimp. The current generaion of youth aren't the first to purposely use words to mean the opposite of what one thinks. "Sick".
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,230 Posts
Literacy rate is the highest it’s ever been. As with all things the boomers on this site like to scream the sky is falling and things will never be as good as they were. They are wrong. A few anecdotal news tickers and dumb social media posts are not evidence of jack shit. And to be clear I’m not talking about OP I get what he is saying in a professional setting.
Have you ever taught at the post-secondary level?
The Kucera-Francis word-frequency list examines a broad swathe of written documents, popular, informal and formal, and counts how often each of the words employed are used. It is often used in research for the purposes of presenting words of higher and lower frequency-of-use. There are other comparable lists, and certainly more contemporary lists that survey different and/or broader text sources, in addition to word-counts of spoken , rather than printed, language, but I'll use this one as an illustration. Out of the tens of thousands of words on the list, one could probably reconstruct the written or spoken content of the average high school, college or undergraduate student with the top 100 words.

"Literacy" can be defined in many ways. Able to read? Check. Comprehend what's read? More or less check. Breadth of vocabulary? Hmmm, I'll get back to you.
Same with violence, we live in the safest time in the history of the world yet the old timers would have you believe that BLM is coming for us all and it’s just not like it used to be. Right, it’s better actually.
Former classmate Steven Pinker proposed more or less the same idea in his book " The Better Angels of Our Nature", and I tend to agree with his approach. Admittedly, it is difficult for the average person immersed in the 24hr news cycle and social media to accurately estimate levels of violence around them. We know from so much work that the constant repeated presentation of the same isolated events creates a false impression of their frequency and likelihood (so Kahneman & Tversky's "availability heuristic"). We know that people who watch more television tend to overestimate the prevalence of crime in their neighbourhood.

Not that everything is perfect. People are still too often bereft of conscience, too easily aggressive in their interactions, and exploitative in their actions. And certainly the countries we rarely hear much about, be they Guatemala, Congo, or Turkmenistan, are not exactly paradises, populated entirely by generous souls. But there's a reason why so many people feel so able to travel around the world and not feel like a war correspondent in a flak jacket and helmet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,394 Posts
Literacy rate is the highest it’s ever been. As with all things the boomers on this site like to scream the sky is falling and things will never be as good as they were. They are wrong. A few anecdotal news tickers and dumb social media posts are not evidence of jack shit. And to be clear I’m not talking about OP I get what he is saying in a professional setting.

Same with violence, we live in the safest time in the history of the world yet the old timers would have you believe that BLM is coming for us all and it’s just not like it used to be. Right, it’s better actually.

View attachment 389465
I’m no Boomer… far from it, but I challenge the sliding scale the umbrella of “literacy” carries. Yes, a higher percent of the population can read if compared to “old times”. As someone who’s kids are literally ending their public school years, they (as a collective, not just my kids) cannot read and write as well as we (me and my peers) were expected to. The bar has been lowered.
So, yay!!! The “wealth” has been better distributed, but boo, it was done with less intensity, accuracy, care, attention to detail??

I’m not an educator, I cannot share studies or hard facts, I just see it slipping. And everyone seems OK with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,803 Posts
I wasn’t forgetting anything implied, I was just too busy and too lazy to write out a more in depth reply. I thought about it, but then said fuck it.
I'm just reading through the thread and wanted to ask you a question about punctuation. Shouldn't athere be a period mark after implied to indicate the end of a sentence? Isn't that considered a run on sentence with the comma? Or is it simply a typo? Can't tell as "I" is capitalized either way.

;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,138 Posts
I'm just reading through the thread and wanted to ask you a question about punctuation. Shouldn't athere be a period mark after implied to indicate the end of a sentence? Isn't that considered a run on sentence with the comma? Or is it simply a typo? Can't tell as "I" is capitalized either way.

;)

Nope, no period and it isn't a run-on sentence either - it is a compound sentence. Technically a compound sentence should contain a comma and a coordinating conjunction but there are instances, such as my sentence above, where a compound sentence can be created without the coordinating conjunction.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,230 Posts
Nope, no period and it isn't a run-on sentence either - it is a compound sentence. Technically a compound sentence should contain a comma and a coordinating conjunction but there are instances, such as my sentence above, where a compound sentence can be created without the coordinating conjunction.
My own preference would be to use a semicolon, rather than a comma in that sentence. Retains the compound nature of it, but acknowledges the beginning of a new thought.

I'll have to reclaim my copy of Strunk & White from my son to confirm, though.
 
81 - 100 of 154 Posts
Top