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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I don't think the cause in the younger generation is autocorrect or typing on small devices. It's the lack of care for getting it right. All the big stars they admire twist words around to make them "cool". It all started with that popular movie Happyness. Now every kid thinks that's how you spell it.
 

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I just had an email from my bosses boss that was so devoid of any grammar, punctuation, or appropriate capital letters at the beginning, or used in the names of people in the email. They are in their 50’s. It’s complete laziness.
I was taught email protocol at my very first job I needed it daily. I’ve taken it with me. Flippant correspondence now is the norm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I just had an email from my bosses boss that was so devoid of any grammar, punctuation, or appropriate capital letters at the beginning, or used in the names of people in the email. They are in their 50’s. It’s complete laziness.
I was taught email protocol at my very first job I needed it daily. I’ve taken it with me. Flippant correspondence now is the norm.
TLDR :)
 

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i have a theory about this. maybe it's wrong, but maybe not:

back in the day, there were proof readers. i only know about them, because my cousin was one. i don't remember now who she worked for, but when ever anyone wrote an article, it was passed to her for grammar, spelling and punctuation, sentence structure, etc. at some point, someone developed software to do this. of course the software isn't going to get it right all the time, it's not human, and can't make decisions the same way a person might.


some of you may notice a certain irony here. me of all people commenting on a thread about this subject. for the purpose of clarity, i do it deliberately. i always go back and check my spelling. it's rare to find a spelling mistake in my post.
i'm not a fan of capitol letters or punctuation, and let's be honest here - i've turned run-on sentences into an art form.
but my spelling is almost always good.

I'm sure this is a part of it, but the other half is that news is all online these days, and in the rush to update things, aggregatror sites often pull an earlier draft vs the source publicatyion/agency which has already been updated. Like you can see the same article in The Star online and on Yahoo News, and only the Yahoo one will have the oiriginal typo - The Star has been corrected.
 
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I'm sure this is a part of it, but the other half is that news is all online these days, and in the rush to update things, aggregatror sites often pull an earlier draft vs the source publicatyion/agency which has already been updated. Like you can see the same article in The Star online and on Yahoo News, and only the Yahoo one will have the oiriginal typo - The Star has been corrected.
Cause nothing says “credibility” like: Hey, you’ll never guess what I read on Yahoo News!
 

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I don't think the cause in the younger generation is autocorrect or typing on small devices. It's the lack of care for getting it right. All the big stars they admire twist words around to make them "cool". It all started with that popular movie Happyness. Now every kid thinks that's how you spell it.
I think we can go several decades further back than that. Think about how many products, services, and retailers spelled "and" as "N" or "right" as "rite", and so on. Even ToysRUs is in on the subversion. No, it goes back a lot further than recent pop culture.

A lot of this is a sort of extrapolation of Grice's conversational maxims, but in written form. In other words, by diverging visibly from how something should be, and is expected to be spelled, one conveys surplus meaning in a sort of "hidden code" form. So use of "-n-" instead of "and" is intended to convey "we're not like those other products or vendors; we're on your side". There's a fascinating semiotics of deliberate language corruption. I was introduced to it by this book: Cool: The Signs and Meanings of Adolescence: Danesi, Marcel: 9780802004673: Books - Amazon.ca

I've been blathering on for years about what I call the "adolocentric society", that has increasingly adopted the norms and objectives of adolescence as some sort of de facto standard for how we should behave, and what we should aspire to. Sociolinguists will note that a big part of how adolescents talk is intended to differentiate themselves both from their parents and from other social groups. In other words, misspelling and misuse of words ("that's really sick") has the purpose of aligning oneself with age-mates and differentiating oneself from older persons. It becomes their "secret code" for communicating with each other in a way that an older generation wouldn't (and shouldn't) understand. The purpose is ostensibly to forge a sense of identity through group membership. I.E., "We understand each other, so we're not like them, which means I know who I am - I'm one of us and NOT them". It's an understandable and important aspect of adolescent development; likely observable for centuries. It becomes problematic when it extends well beyond one's teens and early 20s and is carried over into one's 40s and 50s, which is the trend and scenario I refer to as "adolocentric".

But, all of that being said, I think it unwise to attribute the decline of "proper" language to any single thing. This is a mountain being eroded by many different factors on all sides.
 

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I read a book by Nicolas Carr, "The Shallows". Basically explains that people rarely go into deep thought patterns now because of the internet...I believe that his theory is proving correct.

I teach Carr each term. He actually has a deeper, evolutionary argument that I find quite interesting. Students never catch it until I've explained it to them though.
 

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I saw that too...coming from a man who says never makes spelling mistakes. ;)

Being a journalist with a BA in English/Journalism, I see every single spelling mistake, every punctuation and grammatical goof. I was a near-champion speller in school also, and have been accused several times of being a Grammar Nazi. I guess someone has to stand up for the English language.

The OP has a point. It seems today's journalists lack basic skills. Sad.

The one that really bugs me is seeing the names of countries used when the adjective should be used. For example:

"One person dead in Canada floods" - should say Canadian

"Suspect arrested in France attack" - should say French
 

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I just had an email from my bosses boss that was so devoid of any grammar, punctuation, or appropriate capital letters at the beginning, or used in the names of people in the email. They are in their 50’s. It’s complete laziness.
I was taught email protocol at my very first job I needed it daily. I’ve taken it with me. Flippant correspondence now is the norm.
50s, not 50's.

The apostrophe does not denote the plural form that many people think it denotes.

Also, when talking about decades people will write 60's when they should be writing '60s as the apostrophe indicates that something has been removed as it does in a contraction.
 

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I just had an email from my bosses boss that was so devoid of any grammar, punctuation, or appropriate capital letters at the beginning, or used in the names of people in the email. They are in their 50’s. It’s complete laziness.
I was taught email protocol at my very first job I needed it daily. I’ve taken it with me. Flippant correspondence now is the norm.
Its only going to get worse.
I occasionally visit a hiphop forum.
I could be wrong but I think they go through a lot of effort to write badly....sentences like "...Imma talmbout wypipo...".
But going forward, calling out that kind of pseudo-literacy will be a political faux-pas.
 

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The one that really bugs me is seeing the names of countries used when the adjective should be used. For example:

"One person dead in Canada floods" - should say Canadian

"Suspect arrested in France attack" - should say French
When my sister talks about a trip to "Dominican", it drives me up the wall.
 

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Christ almighty, why?????
Fair question.
1)I like to at least be aware of what the younger generation is up to, although i dont want to use the words "stay relevant".
2)I actually have about as much in common musically there as I do here.
3) some of the posts, comments, emojis etc are freaking hilarious there.

I dont get out much anymore so I like to expose myself to a lot of different types of ppl virtually.
Im also on a deals forum thats mostly asian-canadians, and a watch collectors forum thats mostly canadian snobs and watch scalpers, and a sports car forum thats mostly wealthy right wing americans. Also my Linkedin feed, where everyone seems to compete on a daily basis for making the most woke posts. And then theres my stocks/finance forums, and MSN news story dashboard/comments (which might have the most nastiness of all). Its a big world, you gotta find balance.
 
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