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A proofreader shouldn't be needed to catch most of the errors I see including the one I posted.
A lot of times it's auto-correct, and the author being too lazy to re-read what they wrote after that step. Predictive text is another one that can cause these issues.
Mostly boils down to people working gadgets with their thumbs (rather than keyboards) and the short cuts that this requires. And that goes beyond grammar problems to the entire dumbing down of the internet.
 

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1965 Fender Mustang, Ampegs, anything to test an amp.
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I read a book by Nicolas Carr, "The Shallows". Basically explains that people rarely go into deep thought patterns now because of the internet...I believe that his theory is proving correct.
 

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This place auto corrects M1CK to ****
And R3DN3CK to *******

There's probably more, but I haven't encountered them. Yet.
 

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1) They say that anyone who tries to act as their own lawyer and defend themselves in court has a fool for a client. I think a similar logic applies to anyone who feels they can rely on spell-checking software. To put it mildly, you get what you check for.

2) When I was completing my M.Sc. in the early '80s, the running joke in our department was that one shouldn't use the word "causal" in one's thesis or dissertation because the secretaries (who typed out manuscripts as a side-gig) would invariably "correct" the word "causal" to be "casual".

3) I suppose we can attribute some of Mark/1SR's gripe to the decline of attention to spelling in the education system. But I suspect a bigger share of it resides with the general decline of proofreading, and allocating resources to it by publishers. I would be remiss if I did not mention the role that I think mobile devices and rapid two-thumbs typing plays. So-called smart-phones and services like Twitter, encourage quick impulsive messaging, much of which circumvents rule of spelling in order to stuff more "content" into a modest character limit. As great a musician as Prince was, he didn't help either with his constant substitution of numbers and individual letters for words (R U 4 real?).

4) As I feel compelled to do here, once every few years, I present to you an unaltered ad, that appeared in the Pennysaver here some years back, for what has to be the BEST apartment ever. If you have ever had an absolutely desperate and urgent need for, um, "service", this was the one. Well, not unless there was a spelling error of some kind.
White Black Font Publication Newspaper
 

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Iron-manicly, i think a lot of what we read online today is written by bots.
 

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I'd go more towards college/uni grads that made it, not through accuracy and rules of language, but what felt good about what they wrote and how much time they spent in the safe space cry closet.
 

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I saw that too...coming from a man who says never makes spelling mistakes. ;)

Being a journalist with a BA in English/Journalism, I see every single spelling mistake, every punctuation and grammatical goof. I was a near-champion speller in school also, and have been accused several times of being a Grammar Nazi. I guess someone has to stand up for the English language.

The OP has a point. It seems today's journalists lack basic skills. Sad.
 

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I saw that too...coming from a man who says never makes spelling mistakes. ;)

Being a journalist with a BA in English/Journalism, I see every single spelling mistake, every punctuation and grammatical goof. I was a near-champion speller in school also, and have been accused several times of being a Grammar Nazi. I guess someone has to stand up for the English language.

The OP has a point. It seems today's journalists lack basic skills. Sad.
The confusion is that the word itself is spelled "correctly", but is applied incorrectly. Similar to the words "stationery" and "stationary", a single letter in the word changes the meaning. Or rather, the meaning changes which letter goes in that "spot".. Not much time or emphasis is placed on such subtle variations in spelling-X-use in school, in deference to a host of other things. That aspect of education aside, I would expect professional journalists and especially their editors, would catch such errors. But, the same factors that have led to your local newspaper either ceasing publication, or being bought out and serving as a vehicle for less costly centralized reporting, have also led to inattention to the details of what is written and published.

I think anyone with some sort of professional specialization finds small errors related to their domain immensely irritating, be it a misplayed note in a piano sonata, a lapse in legal language, or in my case, widespread misuse of the words "prove" and "proof".

As an aside, my first PC in 1982 was a British machine that had a 32 x 16 character display. I purchased the only "word processor" package available for it, and attempted to write my master's thesis on it. The application did not recognize spaces between words or apply hyphenation, such that any part of a word that did not fit within the 32 characters of the line was simply allocated to the line below. So, the word "line" could be split into "li" and "ne". Any check for spelling errors was necessarily MY responsibility and conducted visually, rather than via software. You can imagine it was a difficult and tedious task.
 
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