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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Great interview here if anyone is interested in discussing Way Huge. I've never even seen one, let alone used one of his pedals. Gimme some feedback on the interview and pedals themselves if you use them.

 

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Jeorge is alright. We've exchanged many e-mails over the last dozen years.
Before he jumped ship from Line 6 to Dunlop, he was a project manager at Line 6 for their Tonecore series of pedals, and some other things. Through what I believe was the graciousness of Aron Nelson, webmaster of the DIYStompbox forum, Jeorge extended an invitation to me to be a beta-tester for the Tonecore series. Through a series of kooky events, we ended up doing our cross-country family trip at a time that put a crimp in my ability to meet their time lines. When a second series of Tonecores came to production, Jeorge got me to be a beta tester for those as well. Due to some dumb stuff with FEDEX, and an error on Line 6's part (the value they stated on the parcel seemed conspicuously low to the customs folks), the bunch of pedals sent to me sat at the FEDEX depot for the better part of a month. I couldn't prove why they were valued so low, and Jeorge was off doing trade shows and unable to provide the needed documentation. So FEDEX returned the parcel back to Line 6.

So, once again, I was unable to provide the requested feedback in a timely fashion. Jeorge felt bad about it, so one day a month or so later, I'm working in front of the house and a FEDEX truck pulls up with a package for me. I sign for the thing and damn near get a hernia hoisting it. I open it and it's pretty much the entire Tonecore series. I think there were a half dozen docks (that weigh a few pounds each), and changeable modules for the remainder of the series. About a year later, noting how much I had waxed eloquent about the obsolete and very hard to find Matsushita MN3011 multi-tap delay chip, he kindly sent me one, without any prompting. Haven't used it yet, but I have big plans for a multi-voice chorus derived from the A/DA STD-1 (which relies on that chip).

I think the only thing I ever contributed to the Tonecore series was a suggestion for a better tap-tempo indicator. The Echo Park and Tap Tremolo used the standard blinking LED to indicate rate/speed. While that may work great for rates less than once every 2-3 seconds, when it came to their Liqui-Flange, that had a sweep time somewhere out near 10 seconds at slowest speed, a little blip every 10 seconds wasn't going to cut it as a "tap"-directed speed indicator. I suggested a couple of ways that the user could have a better sense of when the next sweep was coming around, although it was way late in the game to implement any of them, since the form factor was set and I could only come up with things that required more holes in the chassis. However, they were able to implement a better visual indicator in software, by having the existing blinking LED gradually brighten and dim in 10 steps. As a proud owner of a Liqui-Flange (a great undervalued flanger BTW), I have to say that their solution worked great.

That's why he's a sweetie in my books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the gracious and eloquent response Mr. Hammer. You do have a few good story's to tell from behind the scenes!
 

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Jeorge is alright. We've exchanged many e-mails over the last dozen years.
Before he jumped ship from Line 6 to Dunlop, he was a project manager at Line 6 for their Tonecore series of pedals, and some other things. Through what I believe was the graciousness of Aron Nelson, webmaster of the DIYStompbox forum, Jeorge extended an invitation to me to be a beta-tester for the Tonecore series. Through a series of kooky events, we ended up doing our cross-country family trip at a time that put a crimp in my ability to meet their time lines. When a second series of Tonecores came to production, Jeorge got me to be a beta tester for those as well. Due to some dumb stuff with FEDEX, and an error on Line 6's part (the value they stated on the parcel seemed conspicuously low to the customs folks), the bunch of pedals sent to me sat at the FEDEX depot for the better part of a month. I couldn't prove why they were valued so low, and Jeorge was off doing trade shows and unable to provide the needed documentation. So FEDEX returned the parcel back to Line 6.

So, once again, I was unable to provide the requested feedback in a timely fashion. Jeorge felt bad about it, so one day a month or so later, I'm working in front of the house and a FEDEX truck pulls up with a package for me. I sign for the thing and damn near get a hernia hoisting it. I open it and it's pretty much the entire Tonecore series. I think there were a half dozen docks (that weigh a few pounds each), and changeable modules for the remainder of the series. About a year later, noting how much I had waxed eloquent about the obsolete and very hard to find Matsushita MN3011 multi-tap delay chip, he kindly sent me one, without any prompting. Haven't used it yet, but I have big plans for a multi-voice chorus derived from the A/DA STD-1 (which relies on that chip).

I think the only thing I ever contributed to the Tonecore series was a suggestion for a better tap-tempo indicator. The Echo Park and Tap Tremolo used the standard blinking LED to indicate rate/speed. While that may work great for rates less than once every 2-3 seconds, when it came to their Liqui-Flange, that had a sweep time somewhere out near 10 seconds at slowest speed, a little blip every 10 seconds wasn't going to cut it as a "tap"-directed speed indicator. I suggested a couple of ways that the user could have a better sense of when the next sweep was coming around, although it was way late in the game to implement any of them, since the form factor was set and I could only come up with things that required more holes in the chassis. However, they were able to implement a better visual indicator in software, by having the existing blinking LED gradually brighten and dim in 10 steps. As a proud owner of a Liqui-Flange (a great undervalued flanger BTW), I have to say that their solution worked great.

That's why he's a sweetie in my books.
It's cool that you had some input into the Line 6 Tonecore stuff. Highly under-rated pedals, IMO.

I'm not a fan of their amp modeling so much - the pods and things didn't do it for me - but I still like their effects pedals, especially for mod type effects. I haven't had any technical problems with them (switches, etc) and in a live environment, they sound just fine.

I honestly think the 'hate' is all internet jump-on with very little little real-world, playing out experience. Kinda like Norlin hate. People read something and tell two friends and they tell two friends and so on - all the while, they've never actually played one.
 
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The thing to remember is that the folks who design the stuff, and sit around over coffee and whatnot saying to each other "You know what we could add that would be real cool?", are NOT the folks who set price-points or come up with ad copy.

When I was curious about the stereo implementation of the Echo Park, Jeorge put me in touch with Angelo Mazzuco, one of the developers. Angelo told me that they were originally going to have two entirely separate processing paths, but realized that the number of clock cycles required to do so was going to completely drain a fresh alkaline 9V battery in a matter of a few minutes. Keep in mind that development was taking place in 2003 or so, when the penetration of power-bricks into the market was still somewhat limited. As well, anyone wanting to try out a pedal in a store, would experience less frustration if the clerk could simply take a battery-operated pedal out of the display case, hand it to the customer and point them to an amp with a pair of cables. If the customer was obliged to use an external power adaptor just to try it out, that would mean digging around for the adaptor and searching for an unoccupied wall socket to plug the adaptor into. You can see why they were concerned about how fast the pedal was draining batteries.

Their solution to saving clock cycles and battery life was to implement a pseudo stereo strategy. The dry/clean path is analog and truly separate, but the delay path essentially takes the two inputs, processes them as if one, and then redistributes the product for mixing at the outputs. One of the interesting results is that if you plug into input A, a little bit of its delayed signal also shows up at output B. It also means that one can feed A's output back into B for reprocessing, to very interest effect. Say you plug into A and set the mode to reverse delay. Now take the A output and feed it back to the B input, sending B's output to your amp. Because of the pseudo stereo processing the reversed A also shows up a bit in B's output. But since both B and A are reversing things, when the recycled signal goes into B, it is re-reversed, and the re-reversed version also shows up a little bit in A's output (which is fed to B. Are you dizzy yet?

Jeorge also told me about an interesting "easter egg". Their Mu-Tron-like Otto Filter has something they refer to as "talking filter". It is essentially two counterswept bandpass filters. This same strategy of two bands - one moving up as the other moves down towards it - is also used in other analog "talking" pedals. Now, the Tonecore series uses a common "dock" into which the personality modules plug in interchangeable fashion - a very smart idea AFAIC, The Otto Filter is sold with a mono dock - one in and one out - while some of their other pedals in the series are sold with stereo dual-in-out docks. Jeorge told me that if you take the Otto Filter module out of its usual mono dock and plugs it into a stereo dock, the two counter-swept filters each appear out of separate output jacks. And if you listen to it, or play it in stereo (and this only requires plugging into one input jack), the two filters move across the space between amps. That is, as filter 1 sweeps up, it also sweeps from output A to B, with filter 2 doing the opposite as it sweeps down. I've tried it out and its true. Very neat effect, though obviously not the sort of thing many players would know about or attempt, unless they owned both mono and stereo docks.

Sadly, Line 6 never really drew the stereo possibilities of its effects to the attention of users. I might point out that the M5 unit is also capable of such stereo "re-processing", although since it necessarily uses external power, I gather it adopts true stereo rather than pseudo-stereo.
 

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The green rhino was half the sparrows guitar sound for a year or so, and part of our bass tone for part of this year. Wayhuge pedals seem well built but ive only had experience with the one model.
 
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