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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a friend of mine invited us over the other night for dinner and a few drinks and sure enough it eventually had us ripping a little on some of his new toys. He's only been playing for a few months but it didn't stop him from buying the guitars of his dreams immediately and the fact that he is basically air-banding on his off the rack Gibson Les Paul, Jackson X-series warrior and a Dean Dimebag it doesn't stop him from loving it.
Anyway, it got me thinking... I've been playing the same acoustic guitar for the past 25 years and after playing the thin necks and low actions on his axes it's kind of inspired me to get something new for myself. I really like the feel of his Jackson and am getting semi-serious about dropping over a grand on a new Jackson Pro Series Soloist for myself. I can play but I'm not anything special and wondered if I'm just blowing cash for no reason or if I'm buying something that will thrill me for the next 25 years?
 

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I really like the feel of his Jackson and am getting semi-serious about dropping over a grand on a new Jackson Pro Series Soloist for myself. I can play but I'm not anything special and wondered if I'm just blowing cash for no reason or if I'm buying something that will thrill me for the next 25 years?
If you can afford it and want to give it a try, why not get it?
You are not obligated to keep it for any duration as you can sell it (minus your "rental fee"/depreciation).

I once said to my wife that I didn't feel that my playing skills justified me getting a somewhat expensive guitar that I was admiring. Her answer was that using my "playing skills" as a criteria for purchasing the instrument was totally the wrong choice. She then informed me that if "playing skills" was my main deciding criteria, I shouldn't own ANY guitars. Very supportive!...LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you can afford it and want to give it a try, why not get it?
You ate not obligated to keep it for any duration as you can sell it (minus your "rental fee"/depreciation.

I once said to my wife that I didn't feel that my playing skills justified me getting a somewhat expensive guitar that I was admiring. Her answer was that using my "playing skills" as a criteria for purchasing the instrument was totally the wrong choice. She then informed me that if "playing skills" was my main deciding criteria, I shouldn't own any guitars. Very supportive!...LOL
I'm sure you're well aware but you're a lucky guy to have support like that... the sense of humour she has is a nice bonus too lol. thanks to your response I'm just that much closer to pulling the trigger.
 

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My recommendation is to look for decent used mid level guitar and amp. Take the guitar in for a setup. See how you like it. You'll also need a decent amp. You won't be happy with a cheap "practice" amp. Expect to spend somewhere around $400 to $500 for the guitar, another $75 to $100 for the setup and around $400 for the amp. Don't be afraid of solid state amps. At home volume levels there are some very good SS amps. If you're anything like me you will go through a few guitars and amps before you find the ones that are keepers for you. If you stay with recognized brand names and used you should be able to get your money back selling them when you want to try something new. Higher end Squier and Epiphones are a dime a dozen used and the quality is there. You may even find some Fenders and Gibsons in that price range. Used Jacksons are a little rarer but you do see them. For amps you can't go wrong with Traynor. A used Fender Blues Jr is another good choice. New look at the Boss Katana line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My recommendation is to look for decent used mid level guitar and amp. Take the guitar in for a setup. See how you like it. You'll also need a decent amp. You won't be happy with a cheap "practice" amp. Expect to spend somewhere around $400 to $500 for the guitar, another $75 to $100 for the setup and around $400 for the amp. Don't be afraid of solid state amps. At home volume levels there are some very good SS amps. If you're anything like me you will go through a few guitars and amps before you find the ones that are keepers for you. If you stay with recognized brand names and used you should be able to get your money back selling them when you want to try something new. Higher end Squier and Epiphones are a dime a dozen used and the quality is there. You may even find some Fenders and Gibsons in that price range. Used Jacksons are a little rarer but you do see them. For amps you can't go wrong with Traynor. A used Fender Blues Jr is another good choice. New look at the Boss Katana line.
Thanks Kerry!
I've been in and out of a few of the local stores in the past month just to pick up some strings and look around so. I definitely didn't have the motivation for an electric that I do now but one thing I did learn, I really don't like the idea of buying something that has someone else's scratches and dings all over it. not to say there isn't a great deal hanging on a wall waiting for me to stumble across it that was lightly used but I was really hoping to buy new in this case.
there's another reason for buying an electric that has become a building issue, my wife works shift so my acoustic is causing her daytime sleep havoc and my hope was to play primarily through headphones when disturbing the house isn't an option.
 

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The only thing stopping you from buying nice anything is your wallet. That said, if you buy a $5k guitar instead of paying your bills, it may catch up to you.

As has been stated, a lot of good guitars go for less (sometimes far less) on the used market.
 

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Thanks Kerry!
I've been in and out of a few of the local stores in the past month just to pick up some strings and look around so. I definitely didn't have the motivation for an electric that I do now but one thing I did learn, I really don't like the idea of buying something that has someone else's scratches and dings all over it. not to say there isn't a great deal hanging on a wall waiting for me to stumble across it that was lightly used but I was really hoping to buy new in this case.
there's another reason for buying an electric that has become a building issue, my wife works shift so my acoustic is causing her daytime sleep havoc and my hope was to play primarily through headphones when disturbing the house isn't an option.
If you are going to be playing through headphones you may want to try playing through an amp sim on a computer or tablet. This will let you try many different amps. Make sure you get a good set of over the ear headphones. 90% of my practicing is done through headphones I use a 1 watt Blackstar tube amp with a couple of pedals but just starting out with electrics an amp sim may be a better choice.
 

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Prime example... me :)
I have $10k+ in guitars and I'm a terrible player. I have them because I enjoy them. Which is the best reason IMO. Plenty of dudes out there cruising around in sports cars that aren't race drivers or wearing $5000 suits that aren't models. It's all about perspective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Prime example... me :)
I have $10k+ in guitars and I'm a terrible player. I have them because I enjoy them. Which is the best reason IMO. Plenty of dudes out there cruising around in sports cars that aren't race drivers or wearing $5000 suits that aren't models. It's all about perspective.
excellent point.
I have some stray commission coming in this week from some project work I did and a revenue property about to get rented this week so the cost of the guitar could be snuffed completely... I just won't have as thick a wallet as I could.
 
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A really nice guitar could be a big help in increasing your playing abilities. It could potentially be much easier to play which will increase your playing time, and improve how well you play. Your new guitar would likely sound better, again increasing your playing time and how good you sound. It is important to know where to put the extra money though. Many expensive guitars are not better, but prettier, or old etc. If you have a friend who is a really good player and is knowledgeable, it would be smart to get their help finding a stable, well built, great sounding guitar that will keep its value and last your lifetime if you keep it that long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A really nice guitar could be a big help in increasing your playing abilities. It could potentially be much easier to play which will increase your playing time, and improve how well you play. Your new guitar would likely sound better, again increasing your playing time and how good you sound. It is important to know where to put the extra money though. Many expensive guitars are not better, but prettier, or old etc. If you have a friend who is a really good player and is knowledgeable, it would be smart to get their help finding a stable, well built, great sounding guitar that will keep its value and last your lifetime if you keep it that long.
I agree completely.
regardless of how much I spend I do need to get something else as my acoustic playing disrupts the wifey's beauty sleep and I agree, I can see a new guitar with a faster action relative to the type of music I like getting plenty of play.
I actually passed the idea to a guitar teacher I'm friends with and he approved of the idea just mentioning that paying close attention to fit and finish has become an issue that unfortunately has become a necessity at any price these days. **cough cough Gibson cough cough**
 
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I agree completely.
regardless of how much I spend I do need to get something else as my acoustic playing disrupts the wifey's beauty sleep and I agree, I can see a new guitar with a faster action relative to the type of music I like getting plenty of play.
I actually passed the idea to a guitar teacher I'm friends with and he approved of the idea just mentioning that paying close attention to fit and finish has become an issue that unfortunately has become a necessity at any price these days. **cough cough Gibson cough cough**
The way it is finished can look good but deaden the sound. Two part epoxy clearcoat finishes are what many guitars have. The makers use the epoxy because it is dry in hours, but can deaden the sound. A friend of mine will remove the epoxy and put on a nitro finish or the hand rubbed finish and it will really open up the guitar tone.
 

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My father (who used to be a genius at crafting and repairing almost anything and working his cars and building his house) used to say "we are too poor to buy bad tools".
I do have guitars I can't play as nicely as I would like to play them all, but they push me to run toward my dream to make them sing.
So yes, you can buy instruments above your acurrent ability, but if you enjoy playing them, you will grow better and better instead of leaving them on a stand or in the basement.
P.S.You surely buy used guitars and get them set up for less money than a brand new one.
 
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You could always pick up a used Yamaha Pacifica for a cheap temporary (or long term) player. I know a guy that gigs with one. Plays and sounds great...
 
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