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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need a neck plate for a guitar I'm building and I have a couple. One of them includes a plastic spacer with a raised edge. The neck plate fits neatly into it.

Other than a fairly stable spacer, is there any benefit to this or is it a negative?

I'd be grateful for your opinions.

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Purists will tell you it is going to ruin the something something.

I will tell you my dad use to shim the saddles in 50's Martins with margarine container lids.

You believe what you want :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Purists will tell you it is going to ruin the something something.

I will tell you my dad use to shim the saddles in 50's Martins with margarine container lids.

You believe what you want :)
Well, it's not between the body and the neck so I'm just curious if there's some functional benefit I'm not considering, some reason for that piece of plastic. I'm not an engineer, but I can often understand....
 

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Sorry, I was under the impression you were asking about its effect not its function.

It looks hella cool is why buddy. Sometimes that is all you need to know :)
 

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For one of my Taylors I had to make a neck reset on, I did use a plastic piece between the neck and body because I had no wood piece at hand. The neck was fully bolted to the body, no glue. I cannot say if it actually changed the sound, but to my ears, it was not ruined ! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
For one of my Taylors I had to make a neck reset on, I did use a plastic piece between the neck and body because I had no wood piece at hand. The neck was fully bolted to the body, no glue. I cannot say if it actually changed the sound, but to my ears, it was not ruined ! ;)
This seems to be a cosmetic thing.
 

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I dunno...I want the hardest possible connection for the neck, with no give if at all possible. I think the plastic might allow some give, which coud impact sustain, etc.

So to answer your question, I wouldn't want it there, and I am sure it's purely psychological on my part.
 

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I dunno...I want the hardest possible connection for the neck, with no give if at all possible. I think the plastic might allow some give, which coud impact sustain, etc.

So to answer your question, I wouldn't want it there, and I am sure it's purely psychological on my part.
I agree with this. The difference could be negligible or non existent but I wouldn‘t want it. If it was a great idea Leo would have thought of it. :)
 

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I've seen them on lower end guitar like a Rocker guitar never on a high end guitar. I bought a neck plate from music lilly on Amazon it came with the plastic plate. I didn't use it. So ya it's personal choice I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I dunno...I want the hardest possible connection for the neck, with no give if at all possible. I think the plastic might allow some give, which coud impact sustain, etc.

So to answer your question, I wouldn't want it there, and I am sure it's purely psychological on my part.

To be totally transparent, that's a part of why I posted the thread. Something in me wants to believe it somehow cheapens the piece, and like you, I think that's porobably all in my mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've seen them on lower end guitar like a Rocker guitar never on a high end guitar. I bought a neck plate from music lilly on Amazon it came with the plastic plate. I didn't use it. So ya it's personal choice I guess.
I have done exactly the same, and my gut is to not use it. I have another neck plate or two anyway.
 

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Protects finish as plastic is softer than metal. With that said, because the plastic is softer, it also tends to absorb vibration more. I wouldn’t think the difference in sustain with the plastic protector on vs. off would be noticeable though. With that said, no high end or vintage bolt-on neck ever came with one of these (at least not a Fender one), so for that reason alone, I’d opt to not use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I know it will mark the nitro if I put the steel plate right against the finish, but who cares? It will leave an indentation in the shape of a neck plate which will be concealed by....the neck plate.

I guess Steve may see the marks if he removes the neck.
 

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Could be as simple as allowing for a thinner body without changing the length of the screws? Other than aesthetics, I can't imagine it would make any difference
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Could be as simple as allowing for a thinner body without changing the length of the screws? Other than aesthetics, I can't imagine it would make any difference
I guess, but it's only about 1~2mm thick.

I have an assortment of screws and hardware and I use what I need in every case. I'm leaning with the consensus here.
 

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It's for protecting the finish from cracks and chips. On cheaper guitars, the neckplate is not finished well (or at all) on the underside (where it touches on the finish) and can easily cut into and chip off some paint with the burr left from the press cut. Some guitars have this happening after couple of neck removals or overtightening the neck screws (like the Eric Johnson strat) or sim. thin finish models.

Some manufacturers have/had different solution for this problem. I played a nice ESP 800 Series strat recently, where the neckplate is recessed into the wood completely (flush with the back of guitar).
 

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on a lower end guitar with less attention to detail in production and assembly a spacer would reduce the need for culling out neck plates that weren't dead flat or sprayed finishes that had a wrinkle or drip or inconsistent thickness where the neck plate sits that would cause the plate to high-center on the inconsistency and wobble or not tighten up right

on a higher end instrument you'd hope that the assembler would toss those bits in the seconds bin or send the body back for a finish repair but if everything on your production table needs to go out the door right now maybe it's good to have a way to account for little inconsistencies by using a plastic spacer pad. or maybe just the speed they expect them to put bodies and necks together they were getting scratches on the back and easier to add a cheap plastic part than to let them slow down and work more carefully.

j
 

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I think they were just used to help stop a poly finish from potential cracking by an over zealous tech.
I doubt it would make much of a difference wrt sustain and string energy but I'd just go without the plastic spacer. Myself, I like a stainless steel neck plate and screws. I usually buy those Solo steel neck plates and remove the logo- they're the cheapest SS neck plates I've found.
 
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