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I have a Yamaha Sc1200 on the way. I bought it online on a whim. The Super Combinator series was made from 77-80. The SC1200 was the top of the line with neck through construction, ebony board, 3 blade pickups and a pickup switching system that gave 13 different tones. At the time, it cost the same as the SG2000(!). Strat-y shape but hard tail. It looks like this:








Will update once it arrives, hopefully next week.
 

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I owned one of these back in the 80's and it was a great guitar. Lots of tone possibilities. These is one for sale here in Ottawa at Spaceman music. They are asking 999.00 i believe.
 

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Looks like a nice player. Personally, I have reservations about "combination-lock guitars" that use one of those Brian May systems to switch between tones. They are great for noodling around on one's own, or in the studio, but awkward for gigging as they can require too many motions to make simple switches from, say, neck to bridge. A three or 5-way knife switch would permit more fluid changes. Pity there's no pickguard to mount it to. Still, a beauty that probably has great sustain, and certainly has great upper fret access. Congrats.
 

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Looks like a nice player. Personally, I have reservations about "combination-lock guitars" that use one of those Brian May systems to switch between tones. They are great for noodling around on one's own, or in the studio, but awkward for gigging as they can require too many motions to make simple switches from, say, neck to bridge. A three or 5-way knife switch would permit more fluid changes. Pity there's no pickguard to mount it to. Still, a beauty that probably has great sustain, and certainly has great upper fret access. Congrats.
Mark, you are right about the micro switching in a live situation. If i remember thats why i sold it.
 

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I think it was BC Rich that started the combination-lock craze.
Again, having more options in the studio is a great thing,but studio and live are two different contexts with different requirements.
 

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This is a learn-something-new-every-day thing for me. Never seen one before. Looks like a wonderful guitar to me. Of course, I want one or two of everything. Lol.
 

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I'd like to try it out...
 

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It's just beautiful but why no pick guard?

Purty and so shiny.

Excuse my ignorance but I have never seen a guitar without one. (And I don't even live under a rock;))
 

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It's just beautiful but why no pick guard?

Purty and so shiny.

Excuse my ignorance but I have never seen a guitar without one. (And I don't even live under a rock;))

just my opinion, but i think 99% of all guitars look better without them. as beautiful as that one is, why hide nice wood under plastic? your parker is one of the few guitars that i think looks good with a pickguard. it just sorta...belongs there, or was meant to have one.
 

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It will depend on the wood and wood treatment. Many solid-colour painted bodies can look better with a pick-guard that complements the colour scheme. In contrast, if one has any sort of sunburst, or even solid stain, on a highly-figured wood, I can see where some would feel that sticking a pickguard on it is like the proverbial bath-with-your-socks-on.

In the case of this particular "hippie sandwich", it would be hard to design a serviceable pickguard that wouldn't distract from the lengthwise visual theme of the laminate. If, say, the body had a darker shaded/burst stain, not unlike some of those 80's Vantage/Westone Matsumoku guitars, a pickguard wouldn't distract quite as much because the stain would draw attention laterally, rather than purely lengthwise.
 

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It will depend on the wood and wood treatment. Many solid-colour painted bodies can look better with a pick-guard that complements the colour scheme. In contrast, if one has any sort of sunburst, or even solid stain, on a highly-figured wood, I can see where some would feel that sticking a pickguard on it is like the proverbial bath-with-your-socks-on.

In the case of this particular "hippie sandwich", it would be hard to design a serviceable pickguard that wouldn't distract from the lengthwise visual theme of the laminate. If, say, the body had a darker shaded/burst stain, not unlike some of those 80's Vantage/Westone Matsumoku guitars, a pickguard wouldn't distract quite as much because the stain would draw attention laterally, rather than purely lengthwise.
There are otehr considerations, but I do think if a guitar is a solid colour a pickguard is a good thing
If you can see the grain I like it better without.
ANd thus why my EB3 copy bass has it removed
And my Les Paul copy as well...
 

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It's just beautiful but why no pick guard?
It's traditional. There was a time when people didn't want 'relic' guitars. Let alone pay extra for the treatment.
 
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