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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm looking for opinions from members that have used services that protect against identity theft and cc fraud. I've had to cancel one of my cc's 3 times this year and various other matters but the last straw was this past week with a brand new credit card (no history), only days old with two transactions to its credit (no pun) and some group or individual made a couple big orders of Swiss Chalet in Alberta(!).

I need to use ccards because of travels and I go the PayPal route as much as I can but this is starting to be a pain and the trend is not diminishing.

Positive and negative experiences welcomed

thx
 

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Send me a card and I'll make sure it's working ok!! ;-).


All jokes aside, sorry to hear man. I don't know if title insurance companies work. Sounds like the Alberta chicken thieves used 007 technology to pull that off.
 

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I may be naïve, but I tend to just let the credit card companies worry about it. Ive had several incidences of fraudulent charges, so has my wife...they've always rectified it. they pretty much have to, as in most cases, it isn't the card owners fault, and if they didn't make things right, it could be disastrous for their industry if ppl revolted and cancelled their cards. I suspect its the vendors that end up holding the bag.

not to hijack, but when travelling abroad, do you guys notify your card companies? I'm gogin away next month and don't want my card to be declined/flagged just because its in a foreign country.i know a long time ago you were supposed to notify them, not sure if that's still the case.
 

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Man that sucks and i know how you feel. Some douche bags got a 10,000 dollar credit line from a TD bank with my drivers licence and my social insurance number that they stole somewhere. It turned out o.k but i filed a police report, also all credit application sites, then i reported it to the Canadian gov. then my bank etc.... Dont really know how to protect myself other than all the steps i took in o
I may be naïve, but I tend to just let the credit card companies worry about it. Ive had several incidences of fraudulent charges, so has my wife...they've always rectified it. they pretty much have to, as in most cases, it isn't the card owners fault, and if they didn't make things right, it could be disastrous for their industry if ppl revolted and cancelled their cards. I suspect its the vendors that end up holding the bag.

not to hijack, but when travelling abroad, do you guys notify your card companies? I'm gogin away next month and don't want my card to be declined/flagged just because its in a foreign country.i know a long time ago you were supposed to notify them, not sure if that's still the case.
I think you still have to notify them.I know the last time we went to the USA in 2015 we did.
 

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I may be naïve, but I tend to just let the credit card companies worry about it. Ive had several incidences of fraudulent charges, so has my wife...they've always rectified it. they pretty much have to, as in most cases, it isn't the card owners fault, and if they didn't make things right, it could be disastrous for their industry if ppl revolted and cancelled their cards. I suspect its the vendors that end up holding the bag.

not to hijack, but when travelling abroad, do you guys notify your card companies? I'm gogin away next month and don't want my card to be declined/flagged just because its in a foreign country.i know a long time ago you were supposed to notify them, not sure if that's still the case.

My credit card company doesn't require that you notify them, but suggests that you do in order to avoid problems. There is even a link on the account webpage through which to do this. It would probably be a good idea to do so and should only take you a minute or two.
 

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<snip> the last straw was this past week with a brand new credit card (no history), only days old with two transactions to its credit (no pun) and some group or individual made a couple big orders of Swiss Chalet in Alberta(!). <snip>
I'm not an expert, but would guess that someone working in the post office may have used NFC /magnetic reader technology to capture information from your new card while it was in its envelope on the way to you. If that guess is correct, banks have some rocky times ahead and guess who will pay for it?!

Touch wood, in several decades we've had just two incidents of credit card fraud and we're heavy card users who travel a lot with them. One of them was my wife's fault - she left the card in her car's glove box - and the bank's systems caught the suspicious use of it so they called us. The other was my card, thousands of dollars found on my bill, and I never learned how my card was compromised (I still had it and am very careful with it). In both cases the banks covered everything so we haven't looked for a third-party protection scheme but I'm suspicious about their effectiveness.
 

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Actually, one of the most common methods for stealing people's credit card info is to swap the card reader with a "hacked" card reader or add a "skimmer" to the card reader. Serving staff at restaurants should NEVER leave the portable credit reader at a table and staff at any store should always be positioned within view and reach of the credit card reader. And they should always be watching customers while they handle the reader.

As a customer, before tapping, swiping, or inserting your credit card into any physical credit card reader (retail, gas, restaurant, etc.), you should always check the reader for potential tampering and/or "skimming" devices.

Here's an example of a "skimming" device added to an ATM machine:


Another one at a gas station:


Most of the time, they are completely invisible to the untrained eye.

Even a well trained eye will miss them because they can look so authentic:



If the portable card reader (the kind used at restaurants) was swapped for a hacked card reader, it is pretty much undetectable. And this is only one method. Stealing credit card info via physical means is actually VERY easy (far easier than it should be.) The RFID chips in credit cards are the easiest things to hack using NFC or low cost radio scanners, but credit card companies seem to choose to ignore that fact (and silence those who try to expose it.)

Online payment methods are actually the most secure (even more secure than physically going somewhere and using your credit card.) Just as long as you are placing your purchase using a virus-free/malware-free computer over a secured network with a trustworthy business using a standardized payment gateway (high level encryption). So, sure it's more secure, but with many caveats.

In fact, calling a company to give your credit card info over the phone is one of the least secure ways to pay for something. Credit card companies themselves even advise against it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I may be naïve, but I tend to just let the credit card companies worry about it. Ive had several incidences of fraudulent charges, so has my wife...they've always rectified it. they pretty much have to, as in most cases, it isn't the card owners fault, and if they didn't make things right, it could be disastrous for their industry if ppl revolted and cancelled their cards. I suspect its the vendors that end up holding the bag.

not to hijack, but when travelling abroad, do you guys notify your card companies? I'm gogin away next month and don't want my card to be declined/flagged just because its in a foreign country.i know a long time ago you were supposed to notify them, not sure if that's still the case.
My thoughts were similar as to let the cc company absorb the risk but I'm looking for a service that will minimize the pita factor on my end (updating providers with new numbers, paperwork for reversing charges, etc) and, protect me from other risks (identity theft for one). For travelling, you used to be able to notify the cc company via online banking but I just tried for my upcoming trip and received the following message.

You do not need to inform CIBC if you plan to use your CIBC credit or debit cards while travelling. No matter where you are, CIBC’s fraud systems will monitor your account(s) for suspicious transactions.
Should we need to reach you regarding the security of your account, please make sure your ‘My Profile’ section of Online Banking is up to date.
 

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At least credit cards have measures to reimburse you in case of fraud. Debit cards and the banks will leave you high and dry if you get shafted. I've been witness to and have been victim of debit card fraud.
A few years ago my Credit Union debit card wouldn't work for a haircut. I called when I got home to find out that my debit card had been used at a credit union in Quebec and was cancelled. I was reimbursed the $400.
 

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I was at my local clothing store and they had these small Secrid wallets which I will use when I'm traveling and out and about.

View attachment 95857
I wouldn't use one of those on a regular basis as I carry enough stuff in my pockets but if I was vacationing in the States, I would use one. That's where I had my credit card copied a couple of years ago.

The credit card companies come good for any fraud charges so I don't worry about it too much.
 
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